House of Commons Hansard #124 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-20.

Topics

Apec Summit
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I think it is vitally important that members opposite, particularly members of the party that created the commission, would respect its right to do its work and that we would not be reacting to every piece of information as it comes along.

It is very important that we let this exercise continue because Canadians deserve to know the truth.

Apec Summit
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Diane St-Jacques Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, in case this government does not know, I will inform it.

Suharto's army has killed millions of people in Indonesia. These are the very soldiers they let into Canada.

When they asked the RCMP if they could shoot at the demonstrators, why did the Prime Minister not have them expelled from the country?

Apec Summit
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, the security arrangements around APEC were the responsibility of the RCMP. It is those very arrangements that are being investigated by a structure that was put in place by the House and deserves our respect.

They are going to get to the truth and I wish members opposite would let them do their job.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health.

The minister recently announced the launch of a series of nationwide consultations on the future of the health protection program in Canada.

Could the minister explain the full scope of these consultations by outlining how he plans to strengthen and modernize our capacity for protecting the health of all Canadians?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the process of renewing and strengthening the health protection branch is well underway.

During the summer we published discussion documents which set out the principles we want Canadians to consider. There are public hearings being held now across the country. Winnipeg tomorrow. Halifax earlier this month.

We are identifying a need for leading edge science in the health protection branch. We want to make the process is more open so that whether it is drug approvals or veterinary products Canadians will understand the process by which we consider, weigh risks and give approval or denial. We also appointed an arm's length science advisory board.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Howard Hilstrom Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, in addition to the non-tariff trade barriers from South Dakota, Americans have initiated anti-dumping action against our beef, dairy and the transparency of the Canadian Wheat Board.

Yesterday the agriculture minister stood and told the House he would take action under NAFTA and the WTO. Twenty-four hours have elapsed. What NAFTA or WTO action has been taken?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, the ambassador in Washington is meeting with high level people in the United States today. We are making it very clear to those in the United States that we will take action if they do not fix this situation and bring their people into line. We will follow the legal course that is available to us through NAFTA and WTO.

Scrapie
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Hélène Alarie Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.

To date, 11,000 sheep have been killed in Quebec to prevent scrapie. According to our information, the minister is preparing to carry on and slaughter thousands more.

Instead of continuing the massacre, should the minister not stop it, examine the whole situation and control the disease more intelligently than by slaughtering entire herds?

Scrapie
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, we are treating this disease the same way that we treat all reportable diseases in Canada and in an equitable way across the country.

The disease has to be treated in that way. We are doing it exactly the way in which the advisory council of the chief federation for Canada advised us and requested us to do. We will continue to proceed on that and work with the industry and the provincial government of Quebec in order to help the industry.

I would again request that the hon. member might ask the minister of agriculture in Quebec to respond to the correspondence from me.

Apec Summit
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Peter Mancini Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, yesterday and again today the Prime Minister said students with complaints against the RCMP would have an opportunity to present their views to the public complaints commission.

My question is for the solicitor general, and he should be able to answer this one. Why was funding for legal counsel to the students denied even after the federal court indicated funding would be essential to assist the students in presenting their case?

How can they tell their story, or is this something else the solicitor general just will not have?

Apec Summit
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, quite the contrary. Because the public complaints commission represents the interests of Canadians, that was the reason we did not want to offer support to hire lawyers. We do not want this to become a court. We do not wish this to take on an adversarial nature.

We have been assured by the public complaints commission that these processes are done informally. It is not intended to be adversarial. The students will have their opportunity to appear before the agency that has been struck in their interest.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

September 23rd, 1998 / 2:55 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Matthews Burin—St. George's, NL

Mr. Speaker, individuals 53 and 54 years of age with 35 years of attachment to the Atlantic fishing industry do not qualify for the government post-TAGS early retirement program. People who are 55 with 10 years of attachment to the industry receive benefits.

Would the Minister of Human Resources Development devise a formula of age plus attachment to the industry and redirect funds from the $730 million post-TAGS fund to consider those people with 30, 32 and 35 years of attachment to the industry and give them—

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Human Resources Development.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I welcome the opposition member's question about this very difficult issue and indeed over the early retirement package that we offered last June to fishermen in Atlantic Canada. We are well aware that we had to make very, very difficult decisions.

We have come with what I think is a fair and balanced package. We have respected in our decisions the standard age of 55, which has always been the standard age we have used for early retirement packages.

We are also directing money from other essential elements to give fishermen the tools they need to get on with their lives and to do something else.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

John Harvard Charleswood—Assiniboine, MB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister for International Trade.

Will the minister further update the House on efforts to stop harassment by several U.S. states of Canadian trucks carrying agricultural products across the line? What action is the minister taking to force the Americans to respect existing trade agreements?