House of Commons Hansard #10 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farmers.

Topics

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Gar Knutson Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like the Chair's guidance on this. I thought this was allowed under the rules. If it is allowed under the latest version of the standing orders, why is the member asking for unanimous consent?

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The Chair was seeking clarification as well and it has not been forthcoming. In order for the bill to qualify under the rules to go back to where it was, it has to be in the same state it was in at the time of prorogation. I have been unable to ascertain if that is the case. In the absence of ascertaining that, the Chair is unable to reinstate it to where it might otherwise have been.

The hon. member for Mississauga South may be able to assist the Chair in that regard. Alternatively there could be consultations and if it is brought to the attention of the Chair that this is the case, it may be possible for such reinstatement to occur.

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am not sure of the answer to your question. At the time of submitting the bill to be reinstated or to be submitted to the House, another member had taken the bill as it had been as his own. As a result the private members' drafting office had to make some minor changes to make the bill somewhat different but effectively the same bill.

The original bill prescribed the actual language of a health warning label. In the bill that I could only table in the House I had to yield that it would be the minister who would designate the language in the bill. The essence or substance of the bill is that health warning labels be required on the containers of alcoholic beverages.

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is the hon. member suggesting that another bill in the same form as his old bill has been introduced in the House already this session?

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

No, Mr. Speaker. The member submitted it to the private members' office and never has tabled it at first reading. Therefore, because of the date and the timing, I was unable, or they refused to allow me, to have that bill because another member had put it in the morning before I did.

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Perhaps I could make a suggestion to the hon. member and to the House that would solve the problem, if there would be agreement. If the hon. member would seek unanimous consent to withdraw the bill he has just introduced now, he can always reintroduce it at a later date.

Possibly with some consultations with the clerk, the bills could be compared and perhaps we could come up with an answer for him. Is it agreed, if the member is willing, that he withdraw the bill by consent, without prejudice of course to his right to reintroduce the bill another day?

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is only one bill and it is the bill that I have tabled. The other bill exists but it has never been tabled in this place. If I withdraw it, then this bill does not exist on the order paper and I would be left in limbo.

I am asking the House to reinstate a bill that was passed at second reading during the last parliament, had full public hearings and never had an opportunity to come back to the House.

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The only alternative is to put the question to the House. Is there unanimous consent to reinstate the bill?

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition with 70 pages of signatures from residents of Saskatchewan in most cases.

The petition states that the minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board has failed to protect the true needs of the western Canadian farmers, and that the federal minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board has failed not only to meet with farmers but also with business people and concerned groups in his constituency.

Therefore the signatories would like the minister replaced with a minister who has a better understanding of the issues that are being dealt with right now by these people, western Canadian farmers and the Canadian Wheat Board.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36 I have the honour to present a petition signed by 25 concerned seniors.

The petitioners note that there is still no street letter box conveniently located to serve almost 80 seniors living in my riding in two senior buildings operated by Peel Living in Mississauga, Ontario. Therefore the petitioners pray and request that parliament encourage Canada Post to seriously consider installing a street letter box directly in front of the seniors' residences at 7340 and 7350 Goreway Drive in Mississauga.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, as you know, for many months now I have been presenting petitions from the people of Peterborough who are concerned about cruelty to pets. This concern reached great heights this summer when a dog was dragged for one or two kilometres and was very badly hurt.

I have had letters in which people have been asking for a great increase in the penalty for such crimes. In particular, they point out that there is mounting evidence between animal abuse and domestic violence. They also point out that our statutes in this regard have not changed since 1892 and that they regard animals as property.

Therefore the petitioners call upon parliament to work toward swift and effective action that works to modernize Canada's law dealing with crimes against animals and that the penalties for such offences be made strict enough to act as a deterrent against such behaviour.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

October 25th, 1999 / 3:25 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I move that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is that agreed?