House of Commons Hansard #10 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farmers.

Topics

Liberal Candidate In Hull—Aylmer
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Yves Rocheleau Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, the conduct of Marcel Proulx, the Liberal candidate in the riding of Hull—Aylmer, leaves something to be desired, to say the least.

Even the government's complacent ethics commissioner is obliged to admit that Mr. Proulx has stretched the rules of ethics a bit too far by not revealing his financial problems when he became Marcel Massé's chief of staff.

The allegation against Mr. Proulx is not of a criminal nature, of course, but his conduct says a lot about the lack of ethics he has shown in recent years.

Mr. Proulx certainly does not engender pride among the citizens of Hull—Aylmer, any more than he engenders pride among the members of the Liberal Party of Canada, even though Liberal supporters are trying to explain to the people of Hull—Aylmer that Mr. Proulx's behaviour is not so serious and that he can justify it.

The fact remains that Mr. Proulx has just entered politics with at least one strike against him already.

Prescott Gala Of Excellence
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Eugène Bellemare Carleton—Gloucester, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Saturday evening, the Prescott business community held its gala of excellence with over 280 people in attendance at the Knights of Columbus hall in Alfred.

Daniel and Linda Lalonde, a brother and sister heading the Dan R. Equipment firm of Plantagenet, received the Prescott award of excellence, while a number of other people and businesses were given honourable mentions or similar awards.

I would therefore like to thank the organizers of the gala out for this opportunity to honour individuals and businesses in Prescott who went the extra mile in the past year.

Supreme Court Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Eric C. Lowther Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Leader of the Opposition has long called for a review process for potential candidates to the supreme court.

Today we see that the Premier of Ontario has joined Alberta in a call for provincial input into the appointments of supreme court judges. Academics and legal scholars as well as retired supreme court justice Gerald La Forest also agree.

Having the supreme court appointments made solely on the political preferences of the Prime Minister is a process that does not serve Canadians. The Institute for Research on Public Policy has revealed that 92% of Canadians do not support the Prime Minister having the sole authority to choose judges.

The charter of rights and freedoms requires Canadian judges to make rulings based on what is “reasonable”. The Reform Party, political leaders and Canadians know it is also reasonable to have greater public scrutiny and input into who occupies the seats in the supreme court. This change must happen.

Canadian Health Research Institutes
Statements By Members

October 25th, 1999 / 2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Friday, the Liberal government honoured a commitment it had made in the latest budget by announcing an investment of some $65 million over two years in Canadian health research institutes.

The research institutes will be working to put in place the means to prevent the brain drain to the States, by, among other things, improving support to experienced and new researchers.

The creation of these organizations opens the way to a new era of research and innovation in the health field and to an improved quality of life for Canadians.

In the end, the people of Canada will reap the benefits of the work done by Canadian health research institutes.

Social Union
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

Mr. Speaker, on the eve of the meeting in Calgary to discuss the social union framework, Ottawa's unilateral decisions were providing fodder for sovereignists' claims that Canada was inflexible.

In order to avoid duplication, the NDP is proposing a model of open federalism based on shared decision-making.

Shared decision-making would allow the federal government and the provinces to establish pan-Canadian standards jointly, while giving the provinces the authority to develop and administer shared cost social programs.

Because of the unique challenges it faces, however, Quebec must be free to decide whether or not it will participate in shared cost programs. To that end, Quebec must have the right to opt out with full compensation.

Instead of the confrontation of the Liberals, and the separation of the sovereignists, the New Democratic Party is proposing a constructive solution for a united Canada, a solution based on openmindedness.

Liberal Government
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Maud Debien Laval East, QC

Mr. Speaker, it seems pointless to ask the Liberal government questions. It is under investigation.

The Prime Minister is unable to answer for his actions during the APEC summit; there is an investigation under way.

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and the Minister of National Revenue are unable to answer questions about Telefilm Canada; an investigation is under way.

The Prime Minister and the Minister of Transport are unable to answer questions about the airline industry because the Canadian Transportation Agency and the European Union are conducting investigations.

One wonders whether the entire government is not under investigation. To every question of the least sensitive nature posed by the opposition, it seems that there is an investigation in the works that prevents the government from replying.

Yet the government's answers are one of the only forms of accountability it faces in our democracy. The government's refusal to answer is not serving democracy, on the contrary.

To what question will the government reply now? The bets are on.

Liberal Party Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is a very special day for parliament. October 25 marks the anniversary of a giant step forward for all Canadians. We have destroyed a $42 billion deficit. Unemployment has gone down from 11.2% to 7.5%, the lowest rate in 10 years. We have seen 1.7 million jobs created since 1993.

On top of all this Canada has been ranked the best country in the world in spite of the Reform Party, and we have held that title for seven years now.

All Canadians can share in this pride and celebrate the Canadian way. Yes, today is the sixth anniversary of the Liberals taking office. We put Canada on the right track so let us clear the track for Canada.

Employment Insurance
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, recent Statistics Canada data on changes to the employment insurance program indicate that St. John's, Newfoundland, was one of the hardest hit among Canada's 28 large cities. The EI changes are costing the economy of St. John's about $78 million annually, with only 40% of the unemployed in the St. John's region qualifying for benefits at all.

The Liberal government has made it more difficult for workers to qualify for benefits and those workers who do qualify receive fewer benefits for a shorter period of time. Many workers have been eliminated from the benefits system altogether. This is unconscionable, given the massive surplus in the EI fund.

What has happened to the employment insurance fund for the unemployed? It is high time that EI became UI again.

Alice Taylor
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Catterall Ottawa West—Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, the chapel was full last week as Ottawa paid tribute to Alice Taylor. Mrs. Taylor was the only Canadian ever to be called upon twice to represent Canada's Silver Cross mothers at the National War Memorial service on November 11.

Her husband, Richard, was a World War I veteran and their son, Richard, made the supreme sacrifice for his country at Caens on August 17, 1944.

To the day of her death just weeks before her 102nd birthday, Alice Taylor's zest for life was an inspiration to all who knew her.

When she gave up bowling a few years ago it was not because she was not physically able to continue but because her eyesight had become too bad to allow her to win as often as she liked.

To her son and his wife, her three grandchildren and her many friends, especially those at Regina Towers, we extend our sincere sympathies on the death of Alice Taylor.

Child Pornography
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Dick Harris Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal member for Winnipeg South has demonstrated the arrogance and disdain toward decent law-abiding citizens that is the hallmark of the Liberal government.

The Canada Family Action Coalition, decent concerned Canadians, is pleading for the government to take parliamentary action against the possession of child pornography and the perverts who are part of this disgusting practice.

How did the member for Winnipeg South respond? He said “Protests from groups such as this coalition contribute to a lynch mob mentality that does not produce results”. What a shocking display of arrogance.

The Canada Family Action Coalition is comprised of decent Canadians who simply want to protect our society from child porn predators, obviously something the member for Winnipeg South cares little about.

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has repeatedly denied any personal responsibility in the security arrangements for the APEC conference. “I was not personally involved” was his story both inside the House and outside.

Now in documents obtained by the RCMP Public Complaints Commission, Superintendent Wayne May is quoted as saying, “Right now the Prime Minister of our country is directly involved”.

I would simply like to get a straight answer from the government. Whose story is true? The Prime Minister's story or the one that is now coming out of the APEC inquiry?

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister gave his position earlier today in the scrum just outside the House. I want to add that the commission is being carried out by a very distinguished former judge. It is up to him to run the inquiry, look at all the evidence in context and reach his conclusion.

The hon. member, if he is serious about the work of the commission, will let the commission do its work.

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals have answered a thousand times before to let the commission do its work. The commission has done its work and it has produced a story which is a complete contradiction of what the Prime Minister has said and what he has said in this House.

If the Prime Minister is so determined to stick to his claims of innocence, will he repeat his story under oath in front of the APEC inquiry in Vancouver?

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the premise of our hon. friend's question is not valid. The commission has not ruled on these documents. They have simply been entered into the record before the commission. It is up to the commissioner to weigh them along with everything else before the commission.

Furthermore, and I will end on this point, it will be up to the commissioner, Mr. Justice Hughes, to decide how to manage the hearings of the commission. It is not up to the Leader of the Opposition.

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the security arrangements at the APEC conference were prejudiced by the Prime Minister's concern that Canadian students might embarrass some foreign dictator. He was prepared to suspend the democratic rights of those students rather than embarrass a foreign despot. His response when things turned ugly was a few pepper jokes and deny, deny, deny any responsibility.

I will ask again. How does the Prime Minister explain the discrepancy between his story and the story that is coming out of the APEC inquiry, if in fact he is telling the truth?