House of Commons Hansard #37 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was quebec.

Topics

Referendums
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Referendums
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

The Speaker

The government House leader.

Referendums
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I have great respect for the hon. member opposite, as he very well knows.

I already told him a bit earlier today that it was impossible to give notice earlier this week. I told him this a bit earlier, and he knows it perfectly well. I had wanted to give notice that would have allowed the bill to be formally introduced.

No notice was given until this morning. This morning it became possible. I signed the notice roughly 30 minutes ago. In fact, it was stamped at 11.10 a.m. and gives official notice that the bill will be formally introduced next week.

Tobacco Products
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Reform

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is very interesting that the finance minister believes his government has done all that it can to stop smoking.

The health minister is under the same delusion. In an article he wrote yesterday he believes that his government is in favour of health promotion. The facts are that on this government's watch a quarter of a million children have picked up smoking. It has reversed a 15 year trend of decline in smoking.

How can the government and its ministers say they are promoting health when through their actions smoking by children has increased over the last five years?

Tobacco Products
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

An hon. member

There is nobody home.

Tobacco Products
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

Mr. Speaker, our government has been dedicated to trying to stop smoking. We have increased the taxes on cigarettes four times in collaboration with the provinces.

The Reform Party should come clean with us. We know that the member opposite has called for massive increases in cigarette taxes and is oblivious to smuggling issues. If that is the case, does his party agree with him? Why is it criticizing our cigarette tax increases on its website?

Transport
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Reform

John Duncan Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, somebody will be home for this question.

B.C. municipal governments and others are complaining about Department of Transport strong arm negotiating tactics and threats of demolition in attempts to transfer over 50 west coast docks.

For example, the dock at Ahousat is in great shape for at least another 10 years. It is the only large boat dock in the area. It is an essential port in a storm with a replacement value of $300,000. Why is the department planning to spend $130,000 to demolish it?

Transport
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, with great respect this is really an order paper question. I will certainly get the detailed answer to the hon. member at the earliest convenience to him.

Referendums
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister keeps referring to the need for a clear question to justify the federal government's involvement in the Quebec referendum process, while he likes to conduct his business in a murky and secretive way, as he did in 1982.

To make a judgment on the clarity of the question involves determining whether that question will be understood by those who will vote on it. It is a judgment of a cultural nature.

My question is for the Prime Minister. What makes the federal parliament better able to assess the clarity of the question than the Quebec national assembly?

Referendums
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the national assembly may ask any question it wants. We are simply saying that once the question will be put the Parliament of Canada and the House of Commons will see if it complies with the supreme court ruling. It is as simple as that.

We want a clear question and a clear result. These conditions were imposed on us by the supreme court and we want to comply with the court's ruling. I hope the Bloc Quebecois will do the same.

We are simply respecting the supreme court ruling.

Referendums
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères, QC

Mr. Speaker, the question really is: Why should people in Moose Jaw, Whitehorse, Toronto and Vancouver be better able to assess the clarity of the question than people in Jonquière, Trois-Rivières, Gaspé or Montreal?

Referendums
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, right now, people in Trois-Rivières, Chicoutimi and so on do not want the Parti Quebecois to hold a new referendum. They want to deal with the real issues.

At any rate, when the day comes to make a decision on breaking up a country called Canada, it is clear that all the citizens of that country will have an interest in keeping it together.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

December 10th, 1999 / 11:45 a.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canada's middle income employed wage slaves are being crushed by their tax burden. These middle income people have worked for 20 or 30 years and they just cannot seem to get ahead because half of their earnings are taken from them month after month, year after year. They just keep getting more and more abuse at the hands of the tax man.

Will the finance minister give some hope to these taxpayers by committing substantial broad based tax relief that will actually bring their tax load down?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, if the Reform Party is sincere in its desire to help middle income taxpayers, why is it that despite the fact that the government has cut taxes in each of the last two budgets, the Reform Party's official position is that there be no tax cuts prior to the year 2000?

I simply ask the hon. member, why does he stand up in the House and give a position that bears no relationship to his party's official policy?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Reform

Grant McNally Dewdney—Alouette, BC

Mr. Speaker, why does the minister ask so many questions? He is supposed to answer them.