House of Commons Hansard #37 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was quebec.

Topics

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Mark Muise West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, in clarifying the September 17 ruling in the Marshall case, the supreme court said that the native fishing rights were limited to the area traditionally used by the local community. That being the case, why did the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans give LFA 33 lobster licences to fishers from Indian Brook?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the issue of licences for lobster fishermen in the area in question is a tricky one. These licences are worth a great deal of income and money. We are attempting to work out a system whereby fairness prevails. Inevitably in such a system we want to have a full discussion with the lobster fishermen themselves. The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and I believe that this process is working effectively. However, we have to accept that in a situation such as this, we cannot satisfy every player.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Mark Muise West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, the supreme court ruling clearly restricts the mobility of natives from moving from one fishing area to the other. I ask again, why did the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans give Indian Brook natives a lobster licence in LFA 33?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member clearly is unaware that with the surprising decision of the Marshall case where there is indeed a need to accommodate a large number of people who previously were not taking part in the lobster fishery, adjustments will have to be made along the line. We cannot simply say that we can change that and leave everything else the same. Clearly under those circumstances there would not be enough of the resource for the fishermen involved. Alternatively, we would simply run the resource into extinction which would be the worst possible thing we could do.

Housing
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, homelessness is a very serious problem. Even in the shadow of our parliament many people still live in poverty and without shelter.

I ask the housing minister, the minister responsible for homelessness and the government what is being done in order to ease the problem of those who are living in poverty and those who do not have a shelter to go to every night?

Housing
Oral Question Period

Noon

Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel
Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, in the last year over $2.5 in RRAP funding has been approved to help set up projects for the homeless in the hon. member's area of Ottawa.

This week I announced that over $674,000 in financial assistance will be allocated to Ottawa's Shepherds of Good Hope. This fund will help create 47 units and repair the existing shelters for the homeless. We will continue to do more.

Tabling Of Draft Bill
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), I am tabling a draft bill entitled an act to give effect to the requirement of clarity as set out in the opinion of the Supreme Court of Canada in the Quebec secession reference.

Tabling Of Draft Bill
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Tabling Of Draft Bill
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Some hon. members

Shame, shame.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to four petitions.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Liberal

Maurizio Bevilacqua Vaughan—King—Aurora, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, entitled “Budget 2000 New Era—New Plan”. It is the result of continuing conversations with thousands of Canadians, a national dialogue that has helped us understand our fellow citizens' values and priorities and how the federal budge should reflect them.

Canadians want an agenda that will see them enjoy more opportunity, a higher standard of living and an even better quality life in the new century.

In order to achieve all this, we need a clear vision for the future. “Budget 2000 New Era—New Plan” provides the road map to achieve that vision. The plan fosters sound financial management, promotes economic growth and a better quality of life by reducing taxes.

I would like to thank all the members of the committee and member of staff for their excellent work.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, we are announcing a dissenting opinion by the Bloc Quebecois with respect to the report by the Standing Committee on Finance, since it fails to respect the desire of the people of Quebec and Canada for a reform of the employment insurance plan to make it more accessible.

It makes no mention of an increase in social transfers to the provinces to finance health care spending, among other things. It once again imposes a considerable financial burden on middle income earners, without correcting the huge inequity caused by the absence of full indexation.

Finally, this report makes no mention of what should be one of our most important priorities here. Poverty and homelessness have been growing problems in Canada since this government began making decisions, in 1994.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Reform

Gurmant Grewal Surrey Central, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the first report of the Standing Joint Committee on the Scrutiny of Regulations. If the House gives its consent, I intend to move concurrence in the first report later this day.

Crimes Against Humanity Act
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Foreign Affairs

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-19, an act respecting genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and to implement the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, and to make consequential amendments to other acts.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

First Nations Veterans' Compensation Act
Routine Proceedings

December 10th, 1999 / 12:05 p.m.

NDP

Lorne Nystrom Qu'Appelle, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-398, an act to provide compensation to First Nations veterans on a comparable basis to that given to other war veterans.

Mr. Speaker, this private member's bill attempts to right a wrong because of discrimination against first nations veterans who returned home after the first world war, the second world war and the Korean war by doing four things: first, providing compensation to them; second, setting up a scholarship fund in honour of these veterans who returned home from war; third, constructing a war memorial at or near Parliament Hill; and fourth, a public apology from the Prime Minister of the country on behalf of the people of Canada for the way they were treated, similar to the apologies made to other groups in the past.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)