House of Commons Hansard #38 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was nisga'a.

Topics

Nisga'A Final Agreement Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

The member for Chambly on a point of order.

Nisga'A Final Agreement Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Bloc

Ghislain Lebel Chambly, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is not this ruling that worries me, but the other one you handed down this morning. At that time, was it a minister who proposed that we adjourn or interrupt the procedures?

You say you made—

Nisga'A Final Agreement Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

I must say to the member for Chambly that the situation which prevailed this morning was in no way similar to the present situation.

Nisga'A Final Agreement Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

The Speaker

It being 2 p.m., the House will now proceed to statements by members.

Mna For Abitibi-Est
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Guy St-Julien Abitibi, QC

Mr. Speaker, on November 23, in an interview with Denis Labrecque of the Parlemenu , the daily newspaper of Abitibi's Vallée-de-l'Or, André Pelletier, the Parti Quebecois member of the National Assembly for Abitibi-Est made a statement in connection with a recent survey in which 59% of respondents reported they would have voted no in a referendum on Quebec independence. He said “The results will be far different when the real question is asked”.

According to PQ MNA André Pelletier, the real question should be “Do you want to disappear?”

Who is it that this MNA wants to see disappear? Once again this PQ MNA is stirring up fear and uncertainty, wanting to see Abitibi separate from Canada.

He will never get me to disappear, as a native of Abitibi, a Quebecer and a Canadian.

The culture of Abitibi is going to stand up steadfastly against the cynical threats by PQ MNA for Abitibi-Est André Pelletier.

Revenue Canada
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Reform

Lee Morrison Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, Revenue Canada's knights of the double standard are off on a fearless crusade against non-profit community associations in rural Saskatchewan.

Apparently having solved all the minor problems like movement of major corporate assets offshore, they now have time to go after the really big stuff: recreational facilities provided for children by groups of volunteers.

Many such groups contract local individuals to maintain skating and curling rinks.

Contractors are personally responsible for remitting income tax and payments till now have been exempt from EI and CPP deductions. Suddenly arrangements that have worked well for years are being questioned. Service clubs are being billed for thousands of dollars in back payments for EI and CPP, money that they do not have.

Thanks to Liberal policies, few Saskatchewan farmers have taxable income. Revenue Canada is recovering a tiny fraction of the shortfall by putting the boots to rural communities.

Communities In Bloom
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

John Richardson Perth—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to rise in the House today to speak about people, plants and pride, the slogan of Communities in Bloom, an organization which seeks to provide a national focus for established provincial and community based beautification programs across Canada.

Launched in 1995 with 29 municipalities participating, this year's edition had the involvement of all provinces and territories. Hundreds of municipalities were involved at the provincial level, while 94 municipalities competed at the national level. With competitions designed to build a spirit of community and to increase civic pride, Communities in Bloom has popularized environmental awareness and heritage conservation.

It gives me great pleasure to announce that the town of Mitchell received four out of five blooms in this year's competition and was a national finalist in the 2,000 to 5,000 population category.

Canadian Executive Services Organization
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Jean Augustine Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, many of the constituents of Etobicoke—Lakeshore share their skills and expertise with others around the world in the Canadian Executive Services Organization, CESO.

Today I would like to take this opportunity to recognize and congratulate two of my constituents, Dr. Gordon Agar and Mrs. Regina Pearce. Dr. Agar spent one month in Lima, Peru, where he provided training to the ministry of energy to overcome environmental problems caused by mercury and cyanide contamination. Mrs. Pearce shared her expertise with municipal leaders and business persons in Russia to improve the quality of their services.

On behalf of the people of Etobicoke—Lakeshore I am proud to extend my hearty congratulations to both Dr. Agar and Mrs. Pearce for a job well done.

Divorce Act
Statements By Members

December 13th, 1999 / 2 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Special Joint Committee of the Commons and Senate on Custody and Access recommended that the Divorce Act be changed to become more child centred and to affirm the fact that both parents have an important role to play in the lives of their children, even after divorce.

According to a 1996 study in the U.S., children in fatherless homes account for the following: 63% of youth suicides, 83% of children with behaviour disorders, 71% of high school dropouts, 85% of youths sitting in jails, and 80% of rapists.

The list goes on. It is clear that children are the real victims of divorce. I support the recommendations of the special joint committee, in particular the requirement for mandatory parenting education prior to the granting of a divorce.

Children do have rights. We as legislators have a duty to protect those rights.

Logging
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Gary Lunn Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, Helen Point on Mayne Island is a postcard of British Columbia's natural beauty. It is viewed by millions of ferry passengers travelling through Active Pass.

Today Helen Point is being logged. This situation could have been avoided if it were not for the complete inaction of not one, not two, but three federal cabinet ministers.

The Minister of the Environment refuses to intervene. The Minister of Canadian Heritage referred to the Gulf Islands as “the jewel of Canada”. Completely out of character, she then fell silent. The Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development promised on November 18 that there would be no logging until all requirements had been met, this two weeks after he had already issued the permit.

The local Islands Trust stated that this situation “requires jurisdictional leadership of the Government of Canada”. I could not agree more. There is considerable goodwill on all sides, if only the government would investigate alternatives. Unfortunately the only finger the government lifted for British Columbia was the middle—

Logging
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Laval East

Minister Of Intergovernmental Affairs
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Maud Debien Laval East, QC

Mr. Speaker, in September of 1994, a certain political science professor stated, with regard to the referendum process in Quebec, that the referendum question was sufficiently clear. First about-face: today this professor, who is now the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, is proclaiming the opposite, loud and clear.

He also said that Ottawa's insistence on the use of the term separation in the question had no legal basis. For this person, who is now threatening Quebec with an anti-democratic bill, this is the second about-face.

Finally, he stated that the terms “sovereignty”, “independence”, “separation” and “secession” were all synonymous. In his third about-face, this person who has since become a minister is now claiming the contrary.

Who is right, the minister or the professor? There is a lack of clarity here, as is obvious in the bill requiring clarity tabled by the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, the confusion and obscurity of which are striking.

Club Italia
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gary Pillitteri Niagara Falls, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday, December 8, while the Reformers were filibustering in the House of Commons, a group of constituent members of the choir of Club Italia performed in the rotunda of Parliament Hill and delighted us with their talent.

The choir is well known in the Niagara area as it often performs in senior citizen homes and hospitals. It is a must in our riding's Canada Day celebrations.

The members of the choir worked hard on their own time holding a series of events to raise the funds necessary to travel to Ottawa. They were proud and thankful of having the privilege of performing on Parliament Hill in the very heart of the nation.

The Club Italia choir embodies what is so great about our country. By keeping their traditions alive, fostering our present culture and wrapping it altogether in an attractive package, the members of the Club Italia choir showed us that diversity is the stuff that unites us and makes Canada strong.

Thérèse Perrier
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Assad Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate Thérèse Perrier, a resident of Masson-Angers in my riding of Gatineau, for her volunteer work in a medical school located in Ishevsk, Russia.

As a professor of health sciences, Mrs. Perrier helped train the staff in administrative and organizational methods. She visited medical schools and hospitals to show how similar methods work in Canada.

Mrs. Perrier made presentations to medical school students on nursing techniques relating to pediatrics and gynecology. She also made recommendations to improve the health care system.

Congratulations to you, Mrs. Perrier, for your dedication, and good luck in your future endeavours.

Canadian Forces
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to congratulate the men and women of our armed forces who are returning from a six month NATO deployment in Kosovo. They are to be further congratulated given the fact that our military members are often deployed with inadequate clothing and equipment.

While the much lauded clothe the soldier program is overdue and overbudget, military personnel are still being sent to combat zones without proper clothing. The Coyote, the light armoured vehicle, remains a liability if faced with heavy enemy fire. Twelve of these vehicles broke down with steering problems last summer.

These chronic problems are well known to rank and file members of our Canadian forces who just get on with the job. They should be as well known to this indifferent government that denies any responsibility for this crisis.

During this Christmas season it is time to pay tribute to our soldiers, sailors and airmen who are regularly sent overseas to enforce Canadian military commitments. They often return home with the barest of public recognition, appreciated only by their families and friends.

Let it be otherwise—