House of Commons Hansard #238 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was preclearance.

Topics

Millennium Scholarships
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, when there are technicalities and administrative standards it is absolutely clear that we trust our officials to come up with solutions and ways to harmonize the systems.

Once the issue becomes political, it is clear that the ministers must speak to each other. I can assure the hon. member that minister Legault and myself are on the very same wavelength. We are equally impatient.

For myself, I count on reaching an agreement so that Quebec students may benefit from something to which they are entitled. The Government of Canada wants to help them finance their studies more easily.

Trade
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Reform

Charlie Penson Peace River, AB

Mr. Speaker, there is a bill before the Michigan legislature that if passed would impose a tax of over 2% on Canadian companies selling into Michigan. Should this legislation go ahead, the cost to Canadian companies, especially the automotive sector would be more than $100 million per year.

What is the trade minister doing to ensure that this legislation which flies in the face of the principle of national treatment never gets passed?

Trade
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Sergio Marchi Minister for International Trade

Mr. Speaker, the member is correct in raising a very serious issue which I think is going to be equally negative for companies from Canada doing business in Michigan and for the state of Michigan. I think it is going to discourage and scare away trade and investment in that state.

We have for the last number of months been dealing directly with the office of Governor Engler. We have been able to persuade him to take away the retroactivity going back 10 years. The fact remains that for companies doing business in the state of Michigan he is still contemplating at this time imposing a 2% tax.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Reform

Gary Lunn Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, we know the government's spin doctors are working overtime selling the Pacific salmon treaty and we now see that the parliamentary secretary is becoming part of that spin machine.

Let us look at the facts. We know the minister is afraid to bring this treaty before the House of Commons. We know the minister has and will spend millions of dollars buying prime time media to sell this deal to the Canadian people. We know the minister announced this deal in a room full of Americans and hired armed police to keep Canadian fishermen out of the room.

If this is such a good deal for Canada, why the armed police? Why does he have to spend taxpayers' money to sell this deal? Whose side is he on? The Americans, obviously not ours.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, we have seen from past action that the kind of tactics the hon. member opposite takes on does nothing for the negotiations. When we want to get a good message out there, we have to get it out.

Had this new arrangement been in place between 1985 and 1996 there would have been 4.1 million more fish available to Canadian fishermen. That is a good deal. The hon. member, as the Vancouver Sun did this morning, should be congratulating the minister. It said that the minister certainly deserves—

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

The hon. member for Laval Centre.

Francophonie
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, in her little summer kit for MPs, the Minister of Canadian Heritage suggests some very interesting activities to help anglophone senators and MPs celebrate, as she puts it, Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day.

Suggested activities include reading a French Canadian book in translation, viewing a sub-titled French Canadian film, and—get this—learning Canada's national anthem in French.

With such a caricature of the French fact in this Year of the Francophonie, can the minister tell the House why she did not think of suggesting wearing a traditional French Canadian Assomption sash for a swim, or sampling a bowl of pea soup?

Francophonie
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I cannot see why the Bloc Quebecois would be afraid of francophiles.

Francophonie
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, in her crusade to save the French language from coast to coast, can the minister confirm that, again this year, Quebec will be getting 60% of federal funding for Canada Day celebrations, while her constituents in Hamilton East will have to be happy with eight times less money than that set aside for the constituents of the member for Bourassa?

Francophonie
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, the most pitiful thing about the Bloc Quebecois is that it claims to support the French fact in Canada, but that same Bloc Quebecois found nothing to say when the Government of Quebec refused to recognize this year as the Year of the Francophonie in Canada.

For people who claim to be the defenders of the francophonie in Canada their track record with respect to the French fact in this country is pathetic, and they owe an apology to French Canadians from Nova Scotia to British Columbia.

Trade
Oral Question Period

June 4th, 1999 / 11:40 a.m.

Reform

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, in April the Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Minister for International Trade said there would a 120 day moratorium on U.S. export regulations targeting Canadian defence and aerospace industries. We now know there has been no moratorium as Canadian companies have been forced to acquire export permits. It is obvious the intervention by the foreign affairs minister has produced nothing. We are talking about $5 billion in trade and 50,000 Canadian jobs.

Will the Prime Minister personally intervene on behalf of the Canadian defence and aerospace industries?

Trade
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Sergio Marchi Minister for International Trade

Mr. Speaker, it is unfair to suggest that the involvement of the Minister of Foreign Affairs has been absolutely ineffective, far from it.

Through his actions in talking with his counterpart, the secretary of state in the United States, they have been able to put in the four month review. In this respect industries are talking. We have made it abundantly clear to the Americans that this is as negative for Canadian firms as it is for American firms. If they have been integrated for the last 40 years, our message is do not fix something that clearly is not broken.

Pesticides
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Reform

Gurmant Grewal Surrey Central, BC

Mr. Speaker, the amount of pesticides on fresh fruit and vegetables sold in Canada has more than doubled since 1994. The amount of illegal pesticides on our domestic produce has tripled since 1990.

Canadians want to know that their food is safe. Why will the health minister not allow the pesticide management agency to release pesticide ingredients lists to Canadians? Why is there the secrecy?

Pesticides
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, this morning the hon. member was good enough to mention before question period that he was going to raise this issue.

I will provide a more detailed written response. For the present, let me point out that while the numbers quoted by the member are accurate, it should also be observed that none of the levels comes up to the point where the experts consider there is any danger. In other words, the amounts have doubled but the total concentration is still within safe limits of the total maximum allowable.

When we created the pest management regulatory agency some years ago, it was for the purpose of examining all pesticides before approval. They are looked at from the point of view of safety in advance of going onto the market. We will continue doing that.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Maurice Dumas Argenteuil—Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, there is a Canadian heritage website which offers Canadians the opportunity to vote for a hero.

This site was funded by Heritage Canada, yet it operates only in English, right at this midpoint in the Année de la Francophonie.

Can the minister explain how this site is unilingual English when it is her responsibility to protect both official languages of this country?