House of Commons Hansard #238 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was gas.

Topics

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, first of all, this is not the website of Heritage Canada. Second, it is a bilingual site.

What I find pitiful is to see the Bloc Quebecois shedding big crocodile tears for francophones outside Quebec while, when the time comes for a concrete gesture in support of French Canadians, the Bloc Quebecois and the Parti Quebecois want nothing to do with francophones outside Quebec. That is pretty pitiful during the Année de la Francophonie canadienne.

Canadian Armed Forces
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

John Richardson Perth—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, as NATO prepares to deploy a peace implementation force, there is a great deal of speculation about the level of resistance our troops will meet. How prepared are our Canadian forces troops for deployment to this region, and how capable is our equipment?

Canadian Armed Forces
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle
Québec

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I would like to start by saying how proud we are of the job our military is doing in the Balkans, in Aviano and on other missions.

Our people and our equipment are up to the task. They will be using the Coyote reconnaissance vehicle, which is very highly mobile, well armed and well protected; the Bison armoured personnel carrier; the Griffon military helicopter; and, let us not forget, the CF-18s in Aviano.

We have no doubt that our professional soldiers have the training, the leadership and the equipment they need to do a good job.

Endangered Species
Oral Question Period

June 4th, 1999 / 11:45 a.m.

Reform

Philip Mayfield Cariboo—Chilcotin, BC

Mr. Speaker, we hear the government is drafting new endangered species legislation. Let us hope it gets it right this time. Rural Canadians are insisting that the bill include three fundamental principles: First, there must be equity. All Canadians must bear an equal cost of protection, not just rural Canadians.

Second, it must be incentive based. Landowners should be compensated not punished for compliance.

Third, there must be consultation. Rural Canadians must have a say in how the legislation impacts on their lives.

Will the environment minister and the Government of Canada commit today to these principles, yes or no?

Endangered Species
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Burlington
Ontario

Liberal

Paddy Torsney Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to see that the member opposite is interested in this legislation.

The minister has been consulting across the country with her provincial and territorial counterparts and is prepared to table legislation in the near future. I attended some of those meetings and I can tell the House that some of the various issues were considered and possible solutions were raised. We will continue to work on the right solution.

Athabasca River
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Reform

Dave Chatters Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, last year the government discontinued the marking and dredging of the Athabasca River from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan. This is a service that has been provided for as long as anybody in the area can remember.

As a result, the federal and provincial governments had to spend $1 million on an emergency airlift of supplies to Fort Chipewyan last spring. Right now the barges are aground, making the likelihood of another emergency airlift of crucial supplies, such as food and fuel, very possible.

My question is for the Minister of Transport. This historic trade route is a lifeline for the people of Fort Chipewyan. Why is the government abandoning the people of Fort Chipewyan?

Athabasca River
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I will take that question under advisement and get back to the hon. member with an answer.

Bill C-32
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Rick Laliberte Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Industry.

Environment Week of 1999 will be remembered as a lost opportunity. Canadians will remember when the Liberal and Reform Parties picked polluters as their priority and not our environment or our health by weakening Bill C-32.

The environment commissioner states that there is confusion between departments for taking immediate action against toxic substances, and that it is now common knowledge that the government buckled and sold out to industry's polluter's.

Can the Minister of Industry explain why strict environmental laws are a nightmare for his department?

Bill C-32
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Burlington
Ontario

Liberal

Paddy Torsney Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, that is a complete misinterpretation of the legislation we passed this week.

The legislation puts in place a strict enforcement mechanism reflecting the commissioner's report and what the committee wanted. It sets in place a toxic management review policy. It forces the government to do research on endocrine disrupters. It forces the government to evaluate 23,000 substances in Canada.

It is a good bill and an important bill for the country. It is a win for the environment of the country.

Bill C-32
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Rick Laliberte Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, my second question is for the Minister of Health.

At a televised committee hearing on Wednesday of this week on pesticides, the pest management regulatory agency and various government departments explained regulatory actions for banned pesticides. In response to a NDP question to the director general of the DFO on the use of non-registered pesticides in fish pens in Canadians waters, he stated this was illegal.

This illegal use of pesticides was reported last year. Can the Minister of Health explain why he is ignoring the illegal use of pesticides in Canadian waters?

Bill C-32
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I was not at the hearing, but I am sure a close examination of the transcript will show that the officials who testified are committed to enforcing the laws that parliament passes, enforcing standards of safety in pesticides and dealing with environmental issues consistent with our objective, which is to maintain a safe environment for all Canadians.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, last night we received another two and a half inches of rain on already rain-soaked land.

In 1997 in the Red River Valley only 1,200 acres were affected. Right now, in my area of Manitoba, over two million acres are affected.

In 1997 the Government of Canada provided $26 million to address farm losses in the Red River Valley. To date, the Minister of Agriculture has announced nothing, zero for the people who are being affected by this terrible disaster in southwestern Manitoba.

What is the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food going to do for those constituents of agriculture?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, on a point of clarification for the hon. member, much of the assistance to the producers in the Red River Valley a couple years ago was part of a memorandum of understanding and part of a disaster funding assistance agreement. That is how much of that was handled at that time between the province and the federal government.

To date, the province of Manitoba has not asked to call on the disaster funding assistance agreement. It may or may not apply. It is up to the province to make its judgment call on that.

What I am doing is not leaving any stones unturned as far as looking at how we can use programs that are already in place and getting the flexibility in them that we can to assist these hard-pressed producers.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, there are a lot of rocks that can be unturned.

In the Red River Valley there was a program where $10 per acre was allowed for custom seeding. There is a small window that a lot of these producers may well take advantage of if the minister would look at a program like that. He may want to look at the JERI program which would also help producers to recover some of their lost input. Those are the options and those are the programs.

I would ask that the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food reply to those and perhaps put them in place right now so that people can see their land.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I assure the hon. member and the producers that we are looking at every possible way to assist within existing programs. I will also be visiting the area a week from today.

I am not questioning the disaster situation that is there at the present time, but I will be reviewing that. I will also continue to discuss with my provincial colleagues, the industry people, provincial officials and my officials the different ways that we can help.