House of Commons Hansard #62 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was question.

Topics

Privilege

10:55 a.m.

The Speaker

It being eleven o'clock, the House will now proceed to Statements by Members and then Oral Question Period. Afterwards, I will return to this matter.

Niagara Regional Police
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie—Lincoln, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Niagara Regional Police service has recently received prestigious international recognition by its award of accredited status by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc., following a vigorous three year test and satisfaction of 439 professional policing standards in areas of administration, operation and technical support. The police service also received the mark of excellence award from the Criminal Intelligence Services of Canada for exemplary investigation in Project Expiate.

I congratulate all members of the Niagara Regional Police Service for their continuing excellence in providing high quality law enforcement to the residents of the Niagara region. I commend our officers for their dedication, pride and professionalism. They epitomize their motto “Unity, Responsibility, Loyalty”.

Grain Transportation
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Reform

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, I am concerned about recent reports that the government will not implement all the recommendations of its own commissions on grain transportation. Both reports emphasized the need for a more commercial, accountable, contract driven system.

A key recommendation was to remove the Canadian Wheat Board from any involvement in grain transportation. Mr. Kroeger gave this warning to the transportation committee on Tuesday:

I am worried about the proposal from the wheat board that you go to a contractual system but the wheat board would hold all the contracts. If the wheat board holds all the contracts but the parties haven't got contracts with each other then a grain company can't call a railway to account.

I urge the government not to cherry pick pieces of these reports to suit its political purposes but to implement the proposed changes including moving the Canadian Wheat Board to spout. Regulation and government control caused the problems in grain transportation today and so will not solve them.

PROTECTEUR

Hmcs
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Stan Dromisky Thunder Bay—Atikokan, ON

Mr. Speaker, let us express our gratitude and admiration to the 285 men and women aboard HMCS Protecteur who returned home to Esquimalt yesterday.

After being away from home for over five months, we wish to join the cheers and congratulations of the flotilla greeting our sailors who have made a significant contribution to the international force in East Timor. They performed a vital sustainment role for Interfet. They ferried supplies, equipment and personnel between Darwin and East Timor, replenished Interfet ships, and supported the land forces of both the Canadian infantry company and our allies.

HMCS Protecteur also provided work parties that helped establish the base camps for our troops who still remain in Zumalai and Suni as well as numerous humanitarian projects for the people of East Timor.

In recognition of the great work performed by our sailors and the support provided by their families at home, let us offer them our congratulations and thanks for a job well done.

Government Of Quebec
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Guy St-Julien Abitibi, QC

Mr. Speaker, in 1999 the government of Lucien Bouchard ate up part of the allowance to Quebec children.

Today's La Presse contains an article by Marie-Claude Lortie under the headline “Griping from Stay-at-home Mothers”. Constance Dubeau, a mother of four: Noémie, 6 months, Amélie, age 2, Adrienne, 3 and Kim, 4, is quoted as saying “It stinks”.

Mrs. Dubeau, of Pointe-Calumet, is a member of one of the many families who do not want to see the federal increase in child benefits diverted into daycare or other programs by Quebec.

Lucien Bouchard is contemplating doing as he did last year when Ottawa announced increased payments for children at home, decreasing the Quebec allowance so that Mrs. Dubeau will not see any more money for her children.

Lucien Bouchard does not want any real family policy. He supports a guaranteed minimum income for Quebec artists, but nothing for mothers and fathers staying at home to rear their children.

Lucien Bouchard was in agreement with secretly holding the sum of $842 million in the Toronto-Dominion Bank in Toronto for 12 months. So how much is there going to be for Mrs. Dubeau's children, Messrs. Bouchard and Landry?

National Capital Commission
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

David Pratt Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, earlier this week the National Capital Commission announced plans for a major long term revitalization project affecting the core areas of Ottawa and Hull in the vicinity of the Parliament Buildings. These plans are precisely what is needed to improve the appearance of our national capital.

This project will slowly replace the existing industrial facilities near Parliament Hill with parkland and refurbished heritage buildings, making full use of the majestic Ottawa River. A beautiful aboriginal centre is proposed for Victoria Island. The creation of a square in the Metcalfe-Sparks Street area will create a people place, improve the tourism infrastructure close to Parliament Hill with better parking and open up a beautiful vista of the Parliament Buildings from the downtown core. Also Lebreton Flats will finally be redeveloped.

I am sure that I speak for many of my colleagues in the Ottawa-Hull area when I say that we look forward with great enthusiasm to the realization of this magnificent plan for Canada's capital.

Violet Archer
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canada lost a national treasure with the death of Violet Archer at age 86. I often passed Miss Archer in the hallway of my apartment building. Though aware of her cheerful smile, I was unaware of the magnitude and depth of her success as a musician. Composer, pianist, organist, percussionist and professor: this was Violet Archer, a woman who established an international reputation and composed some 400 works.

She received dozens of awards and five honorary doctorates. She was born in Montreal the daughter of Italian immigrants and had composed her first work at age 16. She attended McGill University and then studied with the great composer, Bela Bartok, who continued to mould her musical genius.

After attending Yale University on a scholarship, Miss Archer enjoyed an illustrious career as both composer and performer of her many works. She taught music at the University of Alberta and at three American universities.

Violet was named a member of the Order of Canada in 1983. I ask the House to remember today the achievements of this great Canadian who contributed so much to our society.

Arctic Winter Games
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Nancy Karetak-Lindell Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker, this coming Sunday the 2000 Arctic Winter Games will begin in Whitehorse, Yukon. The three northern territories along with northern Quebec and northern Alberta will be joined by Alaska, Greenland and northern Russia for an exciting week of competition in traditional and modern sports, along with cultural events. This will be the first time that Nunavut will have its own team of athletes at the games since becoming a new territory.

I take this opportunity to wish all participants good luck and to emphasize how important it is for youth to be involved in sports. Sports provide young people opportunities to show true character and how to be a team player. Often the manner in which we play sports is a true measure of how we live our lives.

Our government support of amateur sport is truly an investment in young Canadians. I am pleased that the Secretary of State for Amateur Sport will be on hand to help open the games. I also applaud other members who will be attending the games to lend their support.

Bill C-20
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, seeing how the federal government is behaving in connection with Bill C-20, and Motion No. 8, can young people of my generation be faulted, along with the rest of population, for no longer having any faith in the world of politics and its present institutions?

What is the Liberal government's next step going to be? To barricade the doors of the Quebec National Assembly so the Quebec people cannot be represented? To plaster all of Quebec with the Maple Leaf and the commandment “Thou shalt honour Canada”? While they are at it, why not ask the members of the National Assembly to start their session with O Canada? No way, Mr. Speaker.

With Bill C-20 and Motion No. 8, the federal government is on the wrong track. It is headed down a road with no return, while admitting that it has nothing to propose to Quebecers and that it is incapable of fulfilling the fundamental aspirations of the Quebec people.

Kashmir
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Derek Lee Scarborough—Rouge River, ON

Mr. Speaker, for over 50 years the people of the former princely state of Kashmir have been divided by a ceasefire line fixed by military conflicts, sanctioned by the United Nations and originally intended to be temporary.

Both India and Pakistan have so far been unable to reach a final agreement between them and with the people of Kashmir and have fought wars across the line. Thousands have been killed, maimed and displaced by the conflict not just between the armies but also because of the terror of a political insurgency that is stripping this area of its beauty, its economy and its peaceful heritage.

Both India and Pakistan and the rest of the world can benefit from the Kashmir region that is peaceful, democratic and offers economic opportunity to its citizens. I call upon both countries to collaborate in enabling Kashmiris to put violence behind and build a future, pull back the armies and invest in the people, celebrate what the Kashmir region can be for both countries, end the oppression of violence, renew the bilateral dialogue, include the Kashmiris, and please begin now.

Quintette Coal Mine
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, this week the residents of the town of Tumbler Ridge in my riding of Prince George—Peace River were informed that Quintette coal mine, the town's largest employer, will be shutting down in August. Unfortunately the combination of low commodity prices and a rise in the Canadian dollar has forced it to close down nearly three years ahead of schedule.

Tumbler Ridge is a small, close knit community nestled in the Rocky Mountains where helping one's neighbour never goes out of style. At this time of crisis, when the economic future of the town and its residents is so uncertain, it is important for all levels of government to lend their support by cutting red tape and encouraging economic diversification projects such as value added wood mills, peat moss extraction opportunities, natural gas facilities, destination ski resorts and increased tourism ventures, to name only a few.

No one is looking for a handout, just a helping hand. Opportunities abound. The challenge is for all three levels of government and the private sector to put their collective heads together to find the right combination that will save Tumbler Ridge.

The Environment
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Aileen Carroll Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, ON

Mr. Speaker, earlier this week The Globe and Mail reported that the Canadian Environmental Industry Association is worried that Canada's rules allowing the dumping of untreated hazardous waste into landfills are too lax. The industry itself is warning that Canada risks being flooded with cancer causing wastes from the United States because of Canada's weak regulations.

It is not the import of waste that the industry is warning us about. It is the practice of dumping toxic pollutants into landfills, banned in the United States but still legal in Canada.

There are treatments for destroying the dangerous materials, but the matter is under provincial jurisdiction and the Ontario government has taken no action whatever to match the more rigorous U.S. rules. This negligence has been noted by the U.S. EPA. It reflects badly on Canada's reputation internationally, let alone on the health of Canadians who live in Ontario.

International Women's Day
Statements By Members

March 3rd, 2000 / 11:10 a.m.

NDP

Michelle Dockrill Bras D'Or, NS

Mr. Speaker, March 8 is a time for us to celebrate the first International Women's Day of the new millennium. Women's day is a time to reflect and celebrate the progress that has been made in achieving women's equality in our homes, communities and across the world.

This year the stage is set for the exciting seven month long event, the World Women's March, otherwise known as March 2000. After the success of the Bread and Roses campaign in 1996, the Quebec Women's Federation decided to expand its idea and create a forum for women to talk, lobby, protest and march all around the world.

March 2000 will begin on March 8 across Canada and will continue until October 15 with a large rally in Ottawa. For the next seven months organizers of the women's march will draw attention to two key issues: poverty and violence. Whatever gains women may have made, poverty and violence are still huge obstacles to achieving true equality and justice for women in Canada and throughout the world.

For Canadian women the next seven months will be very exciting. It will be a time for creating and renewing relationships and connections around the world in solidarity with our sisters. The women will all come marching, marching hand in hand.

Bill C-20
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Serge Cardin Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, when Mr. Facal, the Quebec minister of intergovernmental affairs, testified before the committee examining Bill C-20, he reminded the members of the committee that this bill served simply to, and I quote:

—obscure the Canadian problem, forgetting that more Quebecers voted yes than there are voters in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island combined. Bill C-20 will not get rid of the sovereignists or the idea that Quebec will become a country some day.

He continued:

The National Assembly is the sole custodian of the right of the people of Quebec to decide its political status. Quebec existed as a political entity before the Canadian federation was created and by exercising its right to choose its political status freely it helped to create Canada in 1867. Never forget that.

He concluded as follows:

In joining this federation, the people of Quebec neither renounced its right to chose another political status nor intended to hand over its destiny for all time to a parliament the majority of whose members come from outside Quebec.

Groupe D'Imprimerie Saint-Joseph
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, almost three years ago now, the Corporation Saint-Joseph acquired the former Queen's Printer, Canada Communication Group.

Today, this former government agency in Hull has a new name: the Groupe d'imprimerie Saint-Joseph. There is more than just a simple name change involved. It is one more step in the move to the private sector.

After its acquisition, the Groupe d'imprimerie Saint-Joseph was restructured, and the head office invested in the latest technology in order to expand its potential.

After 130 years of service to the Government of Canada, the new Groupe d'imprimerie Saint-Joseph has made remarkable progress to become a competitive business. With three divisions and over 500 employees, the Groupe d'imprimerie Saint-Joseph is considered the largest supplier of printing and related services in the Hull—Ottawa region.

The new name marks changes in a historic institution. May the Groupe d'imprimerie Saint-Joseph and its employees enjoy a long life.