House of Commons Hansard #93 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Question.

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

The question is on the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Yea.

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

All those opposed will please say nay.

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Nay.

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

In my opinion the yeas have it.

And more than five members having risen:

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

Call in the members.

And the bells having rung:

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Kilger Stormont—Dundas, ON

Mr. Speaker, we would ask that the vote be deferred until tomorrow at the end of Government Orders.

Sales Tax And Excise Tax Amendments Act, 1999
Government Orders

3:55 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

Accordingly the vote stands deferred until tomorrow at the end of Government Orders.

The House resumed from May 1 consideration of the motion that Bill C-31, an act respecting immigration to Canada and the granting of refugee protection to persons who are displaced, persecuted or in danger, be read the second time and referred to a committee.

Immigration And Refugee Protection Act
Government Orders

May 9th, 2000 / 3:55 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Jean Dubé Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to speak today in support of Bill C-31, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

We have long been calling for the government to introduce new immigration legislation, which was supposed to happen last year.

Late or not, the bill is presented while many chronic problems and faults are surfacing at Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

Today, I will address various issues relating to immigration and to the bill before us. According to the minister, the legislation will be tougher on criminals. I have my doubts. The provisions of Bill C-31 on security are inadequate. I will address the recommendations that my colleague, the member for Compton—Stanstead, made to the committee. I will also talk about the report on immigration that was published by the auditor general a few weeks ago. auditor general exposed a few problems of which the government had been aware for some time.

The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada is aware of the abuse that occurs at immigration. In the 1980s we introduced two controversial bills to deal with the imperfections in the system. These bills, one a piece of emergency legislation, were vehemently opposed by the Liberals. This is hardly a surprise. Liberals loathe taking a stand on a certain issue out of fear of losing the next election. When danger arose, we took action.

Be assured that during the course of the debate on the immigration bill the Progressive Conservative Party will continue its tradition of fighting for an efficient and effective immigration system. We are familiar with the immigration system. That is why this party looks forward to debating the clauses and provisions found in Bill C-31.

One of the biggest fears of this party and Canadians is the entry of foreign criminals. The new bill purports to toughen our present stance on criminals. Much more can be done.

In the new legislation provision is made in clauses 31 and 32 to bar individuals from the refugee determination system. Clause 31 deals with those inadmissible on the grounds of having violated human rights. Clause 31(1)(c) reads:

(c) being a representative of a government against which Canada has imposed or has agreed to impose sanctions in association with the international community.

Perhaps the minister could clarify “a representative”. Is a representative a government official or is it a national of that country?

Clause 32 of Bill C-31 sets out criteria for serious criminality. We do not understand why a serious criminal is only deemed to be someone who has been convicted of a crime punishable in Canada by imprisonment of 10 years or more. Why these numbers? Is the minister telling us that offences for which someone could only serve nine years are not serious? What does she mean by serious criminality? Our party is baffled why the minister would not take all crimes seriously.

Even more, there is not necessarily consistency between two countries' criminal justice systems. An offence punishable in Canada by 10 years imprisonment may not be punishable in another country at all. The Progressive Conservative Party is not comfortable with the numbers as they are set out in Bill C-31.

As the standing committee discussed its draft report on border security, my colleague the immigration critic, the member for Compton—Stanstead, was able to secure two amendments in the final report.

One amendment was the requirement for all refugee claimants to be fingerprinted and photographed at the first point of contact with them in Canada. My colleague has reasoned that refugee claimants disappear and do not show up for their hearings. One statistic from the Immigration and Refugee Board in Vancouver shows that 71% of claimants did not show up for their hearings. Where are they? How many criminals are passing through? How many criminals are endangering our cities, our streets and our children? How many are there and where are they? As a national party, we are concerned about these potential criminals.

Immigration And Refugee Protection Act
Government Orders

4:05 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Matthews Burin—St. George's, NL

What is the hon. member talking about? Potential criminals?