House of Commons Hansard #103 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, my hon. friend knows that Bill C-26, which was passed recently, provided for Competition Bureau powers to deal with predatory pricing.

Application was made to the tribunal after the findings of the commissioner. The tribunal has adjourned those proceedings, but that is a matter that is separate from the government. It is a quasi-judicial tribunal that will deal with the matter in its own time.

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Charlie Penson Peace River, AB

Mr. Speaker, the bottom line to all this is that the Liberal government has consistently ignored the advice of its own competition commissioner on the airline issue.

The government's handling of the airline industry in Canada has been a dismal failure. Some of the casualties of Liberal incompetence are Canadian Airlines, Greyhound, Air Nova and RootsAir, and now it is having to prop up Canada 3000.

Why does the minister think that Canadians will not recognize that the $75 million bailout of Canada 3000 just sets the stage for the massive bailout to follow for Air Canada?

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am very surprised. The Alliance Party, Reform as it then was, actually supported the government's policy. There were no divisions. In Bill C-26 we enacted the recommendations of the commissioner of competition, so I would ask the hon. member to get his facts straight.

With respect to the announcement I made last night with Canada 3000, is he telling Canadians that the government is wrong to give short term cash support to the number two airline to provide competition? Is that where the Alliance Party is?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the U.S. secretary of defence, Donald Rumsfeld, expressed doubts that Osama bin Laden could ever be captured and described the campaign in Afghanistan as more difficult than expected.

Does the Minister of Defence share the doubts of his American counterpart?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, everything is being done to suppress terrorism. We do know that many of the terrorist activities in this world, including those of September 11, originate with al-Qaeda and Osama bin Laden. Every effort is being made, in fact, to deal with that organization and to deal with its supporters in the Taliban. Every effort is being made to target them in Afghanistan and to not target the people of Afghanistan. That country and its people have long suffered. Indeed, what is needed is to continue with the efforts against the Taliban and al-Qaeda.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, in a context where more and more members of the public are questioning the present coalition strategy of strikes on Afghanistan and the impact on civilian populations, what are we to conclude from this message from the U.S. government, seemingly questioning its own strategy of bombarding Afghanistan?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, not every aspect of a strategy is going to be discussed publicly, obviously. We are not out to telegraph to Osama bin Laden and his supporters what the next strategy will be in dealing with him.

It has been said right from the beginning that this campaign will not be a short one and it will not at all be just a military one.

We are absolutely determined, and I know the Americans are absolutely determined, to bring about the suppression of the kind of threat from terrorism that their country, our country and other freedom loving countries in the world are experiencing.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, joint task force 2 is well trained for its role in domestic hostage rescue. Claiming that this unit is intended for a special forces role in overseas operations is a smokescreen intended to hide the fact that the Liberal government blundered in disbanding the Canadian airborne regiment in 1995.

The minister is needlessly putting the lives of Canadian soldiers at risk by stretching our limited resources to cover his mistakes.

Will he admit today that Canada needs and must have a unit like the Canadian airborne to carry on the international war against terrorism?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, that is a lot of nonsensical rhetoric.

The JTF2 will be involved in this endeavour. It is a well trained force. It has the equipment that is necessary to do the job. It is the equivalent of the organizations it will be working with from the United States, Britain and other allied countries.

I think we can be proud of what our forces can do. We should not run them down the way the Alliance runs them down. We should be supporting them.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, lest we forget the lessons of Somalia, knowing Canadian soldiers will be at risk if they are used in inappropriate roles overseas, all the government has learned so far is, when Canadian forces need help, to blame Canadian soldiers and dismantle army resources rather than fix the problems.

Canada, and indeed her allies, needs units like the Canadian airborne now more than ever. Will the minister commit today to giving Canada's military the frontline resources it needs and restore the Canadian airborne regiment to active service?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, no, we will not be restoring the Canadian airborne regiment, but the first part of her question was about resources.

The government has over the last three years provided $3 billion more in resources. The government has made it abundantly clear that for anything that we ask our Canadian forces to do, we will make sure they get the resources to do that job. We will not ask of them something that they are not trained to do. We will not ask of them something for which we do not give them the resources. The government will give them what is necessary to fight terrorism.

Tourism Industry
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Yolande Thibeault Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, recently the minister responsible for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency commented on the economic impact of the September 11 events on the Atlantic region and its tourism markets in the northeastern U.S.

Can the minister responsible for the ACOA tell the House how this information will foster the adoption of future tourism promotion strategies that will benefit the Atlantic region?

Tourism Industry
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

West Nova
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Robert Thibault Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, every dog has his day.

Good agreements between ACOA and the Atlantic provinces are enabling us to minimize the negative effects of the events of September 11.

One excellent example of partnership is that of the Atlantic Canada tourist industry. This year, in conjunction with the Government of Canada, the Atlantic provinces and the tourist industry are investing $5 million to promote Atlantic Canada in the northeastern U.S.

I invite the Americans as well as all Canadians to come and visit the Atlantic region.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

October 26th, 2001 / 11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Peter Goldring Edmonton Centre-East, AB

Mr. Speaker, last week the staff on Parliament Hill were issued high tech rubber gloves to open the mail. This five-fingered prophylactic is not a solution.

The United States surgeon general states that technology is available to develop equipment to sanitize and make mail safe from bacteria such as anthrax.

What is being done in Canada to procure this new equipment to protect our Canadian postal workers and postal customers? Is Canada Post now investing in mail sanitizing equipment?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel
Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for asking me this question at this time.

At this moment as we speak, the Canada Post president is in Boston meeting with American counterparts about postal administration and they are working together to address this problem.

The member will be surprised to hear that we will have the same equipment and same machinery as the Americans. We want to make sure that we protect all our postal workers and all Canadians.