House of Commons Hansard #70 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was first.

Topics

Federal-Provincial Relations
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the government House leader replied as regards compliance with the act. We do comply with the act.

The facts speak for themselves. The Government of Canada does not in any way act against Quebec. The Government of Canada protects the right of Quebecers to be full fledged Canadians and to fully enjoy the benefits provided by their great country.

Federal-Provincial Relations
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, several passages in the documents we obtained after two years of waiting were blanked out in accordance with section 14 of the Access to Information Act, which provides as follows:

The head of a government institution may refuse to disclose any record requested under this Act that contains information the disclosure of which could—be injurious to the conduct by the Government of Canada of federal-provincial affairs.

How could these censored passages have been so controversial that they could have been injurious to the conduct of federal-provincial affairs by the Government of Canada?

Federal-Provincial Relations
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, once again, we see how ridiculous the question is. We are being accused of obeying the law. We plead guilty. We always obey the law.

Federal-Provincial Relations
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, if it is true that the disclosure of these documents would have seriously damaged relations between Quebec and the federal government, will he explain how it is that the federal government acted contrary to its own interpretation of the legislation by faxing complete copies of these documents to the Liberal Party of Quebec just a few days before the 1995 referendum campaign?

Federal-Provincial Relations
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the government complied with the legislation, and the same type of legislation applies, as far as I know, to the executive council of the government of Quebec. The member is entirely free to ask the government of Quebec for any information he wishes.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

June 1st, 2001 / 11:20 a.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Deputy Prime Minister. It has to do with the study released today by the David Suzuki Foundation entitled “Fuelling the Climate Crisis”, which claims that the continental energy plan, and particularly the development of the Alberta tar sands, will raise Canada's greenhouse gas emissions to 44% above the commitment to the Kyoto protocol.

Would the Deputy Prime Minister commit his government to an environmental study of the greenhouse gas emission consequences of the development of the Alberta tar sands before any further commitment is made to that development?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it would have been appropriate for the hon. member to give me notice of this question. I have not seen the Suzuki report. We will certainly look into it. I reiterate that the government has said that it intends to meet its Kyoto commitments and that continues to be the case.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I could not have given him notice because the study only came out today, but the question really is whether the government is committed to an environmental study of the Alberta tar sands development.

I want to ask the Deputy Prime Minister again about energy. I raised it in the House the other day with respect to the purchase of Gulf by American interests. I know that the Deputy Prime Minister has had an interest in these issues in the past. We know that American ownership is lower than it used to be, but this could be the beginning of a trend upward.

I want to know from the government if there is a level of foreign ownership at which the government would begin to be concerned and begin to act.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, with respect to the Alberta tar sands, their development involves provincial jurisdiction. There may be a federal issue. Certainly we will apply the relevant laws in co-operation with our Alberta counterparts.

With respect to foreign ownership, there are laws on the books. They will be followed.

Energy Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, my question is also for the Deputy Prime Minister. Premier Klein of Alberta originally indicated that his provincial government might interfere with the transportation of oil and gas from the north through Alberta to United States markets.

He has since said that the federal government holds the hammer when it comes to such issues. Will the Deputy Prime Minister clarify whether or not the federal government has such jurisdiction?

Energy Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the member might be well advised to seek legal opinions from the appropriate sources, but what I can say to him is that the federal government is not interested in stopping the sale of energy resources.

The federal government is interested in working with our provincial partners, which have direct jurisdiction over natural resources, together with our international partners, including the major markets in the United States, to see that Canadians and Canada benefit the most that is possible from our natural resource wealth.

Energy Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister because I agree with him. I wish to ask him if he is now prepared to exercise the same power to let Newfoundland and Labrador electricity be transported through Quebec to United States markets without Newfoundland being charged exorbitant wheeling fees.

Energy Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, it always unnerves me slightly when opposition members from any party agree with me.

On this one I would like to point out to the hon. member that the federal government, since 1993, has been working very hard to eliminate barriers to interprovincial trade, including in the electricity market.

As increasingly there is an interest in finding a means for the interprovincial sale of electricity such as arose, for example, with needs that came about at the time of the ice storm, it is incumbent on the provinces to resolve some of the barriers that exist—

Energy Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for St. Albert.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister told farmers in Winnipeg to stop complaining because there is no crisis on farms. Let me say to the House that the minister of agriculture cut $470 million out of grants to farmers. There is a drought on the prairies. There is no money to drill emergency wells to water cattle.

My question is for the Prime Minister. When will his government recognize that there is a crisis on prairies farms and when will it do something about it?