House of Commons Hansard #76 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was organized.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, obviously climate change is a very serious global issue and for there to be a solution it must be global in scope.

I am very pleased to note that in the various announcements we have made on behalf of the Government of Canada, including our action plan on climate change last year and the budget of February last year, we included very specific provisions to assist countries in the developing part of the world to catch up with new technologies and to apply those technologies so that they too may enjoy the benefits of clean air.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, these agreements are only good if action follows them. Canada is wasting over $1 billion on this protocol that will not work. The signing of this protocol was done without proper consultation, without proper study and will not achieve the results without the participation of developing countries.

Will the minister agree to scrap his ill conceived dedication to Kyoto and move on to a new and realistic commitment to dealing with climate change?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the fact that the member for the Alliance Party is articulating the position of the United States.

On our part, for the people of Canada, we stand by the Kyoto targets. We have announced $1.1 billion worth of initiatives that will get us at least one-third of the way toward those targets.

We are working constructively on energy efficiency, ethanol production, wind power, solar power, energy conservation, new petroleum technology, carbon dioxide capture and sequestration, and new generation vehicles. It is only the Alliance Party that is trapped in the 19th century.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government is settling for prefabricated replies to people suffering trauma and permanent effects from their participation in missions to the Persian Gulf and the Balkans.

What is stopping this government from showing some compassion by recognizing the traumas experienced by military personnel and providing them with the support they now need?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, we do. We are going to great lengths, putting in a lot of money and investing a lot of time and effort to help people who go into a deployment situation, one of our operations, and come back ill.

In fact for post-traumatic stress disorder alone we have set up some five clinics across the country. We have medical staff on site in the various camps and in these various missions to help anybody who suffers in such a way.

We want to make sure that we do everything we can to look after the health needs of the Canadian forces personnel. They deserve no less.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, the health problems experienced by our military have changed as the nature of the conflicts in which they participate has changed.

The way war is waged has changed from what it was 50 years ago, and the concept of what constitutes a veteran must be adapted to fit today's reality.

What then is the government waiting for before reviewing the definitions and eligibility criteria for veteran status, so that these military personnel may be provided with the care and benefits to which they are fully entitled?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel Minister of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of State (Western Economic Diversification) (Francophonie)

Mr. Speaker, my department has had concerns about these personnel. It continues to examine the situation, and we are going to go still further in order to ensure them of the best possible treatment.

It is absolutely false to claim that the Canadian government is not concerned about all these people. It is absolutely false to claim that we are not there for them, and will not be doing anything further for them.

Access To Information
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Human Resources Development said last week “the decisions made on access to information are at arm's length from my office”. Yet we have learned that in her own corporate sector a special committee has been established to vet the approval of all access to information requests by the official opposition to gain access to information on a file.

Why does the minister claim the process is at arm's length when it obviously is not?

Access To Information
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, the access to information process is under the direction and the authority of the deputy minister.

The hon. member makes reference to a special committee that the deputy minister put together because, and it is no surprise to the House, my department has had an increase in requests for access to information. The deputy wanted a committee of associate deputies in place to collect the information from the field to provide as much information as can be provided in a timely fashion. That is the process.

Access To Information
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, requests for documents pertaining to Canada jobs fund grants in the Prime Minister's riding, the Auberge Grand-Mère and Placeteco, have gone unanswered for months. In the case of the Placeteco file, the access to information office sent it to the HRDC corporate sector on April 6 for approval, but two months later we have heard nothing.

Why is the minister breaking the law to delay information pertaining to the Prime Minister's riding, and are the Placeteco documents in the minister's office?

Access To Information
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member has specific concerns about particular requests, there is an appeal process and I would ask her to use that process. However let me say that traditionally my department has had a very good record in responding to requests for information.

I say again that there has been a significant increase in the numbers of requests but the department, under the authority of the deputy minister, is doing its best to get as much information out as it can and in a timely fashion.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

June 11th, 2001 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Parrish Mississauga Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, harmful emissions from the growing number of vehicles in Mississauga and other cities across Canada are causing great concern.

Could the Minister of Natural Resources tell the House what our government is doing to aggressively combat this growing problem?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, this morning the Minister of the Environment, the Minister of Transport and I participated in an announcement in Toronto about several Government of Canada initiatives totalling well over $100 million and directed toward the very issue the hon. member was referring to.

Specifically, for my part, we announced $16 million for motor vehicle fuel efficiency initiatives and $23 million for the Canadian Transportation Fuel Cell Alliance. On the fuel cell alliance, we expect that market in the world to add up to more than $100 billion worth of potential for Canadians over the next two decades.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Lunney Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, a disturbing story this weekend has Canadians alarmed. A whole host of noxious substances, including known carcinogens, are found and routinely used in pesticides.

These formulants have been considered non-active ingredients and therefore are not listed on the packaging. Such residues may remain and be consumed in food products. The list includes formaldehyde, also used in embalming, and methyl chloride, also used as paint stripper.

Why are these toxic compounds not listed on the packaging? If they are truly non-active, why are they permitted at all?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I share that concern and that is why, when we responded to the environment committee's report last year on pesticide regulation, we agreed with the recommendation that those formulants should be either taken out of the products or listed on the packages. We will introduce legislation in due course that will do just that.