House of Commons Hansard #8 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was speech.

Topics

Persons with Disabilities
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I would be very happy to listen to any suggestions the hon. member has on what he would like to see changed specifically.

As we pointed out yesterday, since 1996 there has been about a 70% increase in the amount of benefits being made available to disabled people in Canada. In addition, there is an indication in the Speech from the Throne that we intend to deepen and broaden that support.

What is it that he wishes to have changed?

Persons with Disabilities
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Reed Elley Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, if the minister would listen to his own committee, which sent recommendations to his department, and the calls and letters from many groups and individuals from across Canada who are angry and upset at the proposed changes to the disability tax credit, perhaps he would do something. Certainly the finance minister must be getting the same reaction as many members of Parliament are.

When will the finance minister start listening to Canadians and instruct his department to change these oppressive tax laws which hurt disabled Canadians?

Persons with Disabilities
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I will take that to mean that he does not know what changes he wants.

These are issues that I have worked on for a lot of years, everything from the support for assistive devices that we have created in a program in Industry Canada, through to the most recent initiatives that involve the Speech from the Throne.

I suspect the he may be concerned that some taxpayers are being asked to verify that they still qualify. Surely he would agree that the resources should be made available to those who are most in need. On that we surely can agree.

Immigration
Oral Question Period

October 9th, 2002 / 2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, today we learned that the safe third country agreement between Canada and the U.S. has apparently been approved by the federal cabinet.

All that remains for the agreement to come into effect are a few formalities and yet it has not been discussed at all in the House of Commons or by the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration.

Will the minister promise today to submit the text of this agreement to the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration, so that we can debate it and hear from experts who could inform us about the many risks entailed if this agreement were to come into effect in its current form?

Immigration
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Gatineau
Québec

Liberal

Mark Assad Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration will be able to answer the hon. member's question when she returns.

Heritage Canada
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, Bill Reid was, without doubt, one of the most famous and influential northwest coast artists of our time. His work is the result of his magnificent talent and a very precious part of Canada's heritage.

Would the Minister of Canadian Heritage provide the House with an update of her department's efforts to ensure that the Reid collection remains a source of pride for the Haida people and for all Canadians?

Heritage Canada
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, as a result in large measure of the work of the member for Vancouver Quadra, in November 2001 we were able to certify the collection for donation purposes at an appraised value of $3.4 million.

We are establishing a tax credit process. I have to say that this is a collection that should never be lost to Canada. As a result of the work of our government and, in particular, the British Columbia caucus, we will be acquiring the necessary financing to make sure this collection stays in British Columbia and in Canada.

I want to thank, in particular, Herb Auerbach who has been an incredible supporter in this incredible initiative.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of National Defence overlooks the fact that the pilot training contract was sole-sourced without proper justification to Bombardier following an unsolicited proposal from that company.

After two years and hundreds of millions of dollars this innovative program managed to graduate 61 Canadian pilots from basic training, three less than the old tutor program graduated every year.

Once again, would the minister tell us the reason we needed this contract?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Markham
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, first, the fact is that Bombardier was the only Canadian company with the capabilities to undertake this project.

The second fact is that it was joined by a consortium that included all potential Canadian bidders.

The third fact is that the only alternative to this is that all the training would have been done in the United States. Is that what the member wants?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, we have heard what Canadians think of this government's softwood lumber aid package. Quebec's natural resource minister said that it was a joke. The B.C. forest minister said that it was insufficient and inadequate. The paperworkers union said that it was little more than welfare for workers who this government has given up on.

The minister announced that this was simply a work in progress. Well this work has progressed once again into a disaster on this file.

When can we expect the government to come up with a decent aid package so that this forest industry has some chance of survival?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, there are others who have spoken about this package and let me quote them. The Federation of Canadian Municipalities, representing hundreds of municipalities across the country, says:

--but this announcement demonstrates the federal government’s commitment to work with municipal governments to strengthen communities that have been hit hard.

Mr. Trevor Wakelin of the Alberta Forest Products Association Lumber Trade Council said:

We welcome the news. We're very pleased that the federal government has come forward to take care of our workers.

Those Canadians understand that this package is good for them, it is good for the industry and it is good for Canada.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski-Neigette-Et-La Mitis, QC

Mr. Speaker, a while back, the government introduced transitional measures to help the people of the North Shore and Lac-Saint-Jean region swallow the bitter pill of boundary readjustment for economic regions used for the purposes of employment insurance. With these measures, the EI eligibility rules will soon be tightened at a time when the region is hard hit by the softwood lumber crisis. Spokespersons for the Comité des sans-chemise have met with the federal minister responsible for Quebec to tell him about the problem and have expressed deep disappointment over his lack of interest.

Will the minister undertake to ensure that his government honours the commitments made in the last election campaign, when it promised to loosen up the Employment Insurance Act?

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member's question gives me a chance to remind her that yesterday $70 million in new money were allocated specifically for workers in the softwood lumber industry. That includes workers in the member's home province.

In addition to that, I have enjoyed working with community groups in the Saguenay along Saint-Jean, with the hon. member who was there, and a number of announcements where community groups identified opportunities to expand the seasons and make sure that Canadians who want to work can work.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans.

Earlier today I released a confidential coast guard document written by the director of operational services for the coast guard that states “...penetration of submerged or capsized vessels...is prohibited... This is not open to interpretation.”

Diver Rick Foreman, who was on the scene at the sinking of the Cap Rouge II , said:

Conditions were absolutely perfect to penetrate that vessel. With something like low visibility, it would have been dangerous. But it wasn't, it was perfect. We just couldn't do it. And for those people, for those kids, that was bad. It was all bad”.

How can the minister possibly justify the cover up that the JRCC had the discretion when nobody in the coast guard knew about it at all?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

West Nova
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Robert Thibault Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, as I said earlier, I spoke with the coordinator of the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre who advised me that he was well aware of our Coast Guard policy as well as the Canada Shipping Act and its stipulations, and that he knew he could authorize the penetration dive if there was a reasonable chance of saving lives.

It has also been indicated that on that day there was no reasonable information to say that vessel should have been penetrated.

Further, the memo the member refers to dates back to September 3, 2001.