House of Commons Hansard #20 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

École de médecine vétérinaire de Saint-Hyacinthe
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I have already answered that question; I think that is the sixth time this week. We are looking at ways in which we can assist in order to help assure the accreditation of the four important agricultural veterinary colleges in Canada.

Hydroelectricity
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, the unbundling of the Ontario Hydro bill has provided the federal government the opportunity to gouge consumers by collecting GST on hydro debt. The government refuses to protect consumers from being charged for line loss on the same bill. The Electricity and Gas Inspection Act, a federal statute, specifically prohibits charging for electricity beyond what is actually delivered to customers. The charge for line loss makes up to 22% of a hydro bill.

Is the reason the government is allowing the federal law to be broken because it is cashing in on the GST applied to the illegal charge?

Hydroelectricity
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the way that Ontario has decided to burden its taxpayers with the debt of Ontario Hydro is to add a charge to the cost of electricity. That is how it does it. I think it is a little under a cent per kilowatt hour. That is how it is charged. It could be done other ways. It could have chosen to include it in the price of electricity.

I know the hon. member would agree with me that it would be very difficult if every business was able to disaggregate its costs in order to segregate those that have to do with--

Official Languages
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Scott Reid Lanark—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the RCMP said it issues unilingual traffic tickets in Gatineau because the Contraventions Act requires it to enforce Bill 101. This just is not so.

The Official Languages Act obliges the RCMP to offer bilingual services throughout the national capital region. The act also states, “In the event of any inconsistency between this act and any other act of Parliament, this act shall prevail”.

When will the Solicitor General order the RCMP to obey the law of the land and issue bilingual tickets only in Gatineau?

Official Languages
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Waterloo—Wellington
Ontario

Liberal

Lynn Myers Parliamentary Secretary to the Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the RCMP of course operates in the national capital region and is fully committed to official bilingualism and providing services in both official languages. The RCMP complies with provincial legislation regarding the issuance of tickets. The RCMP continues to do a good job for all Canadians.

Youth
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the recent Speech from the Throne the government made a number of commitments to youth, to help get youth out of poverty and to build safe neighbourhoods and communities.

I would like the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice to answer to the House and Canadians the concern raised at a recent conference of some youths. They indicated that they were having a difficult time obtaining information about education, safety and other issues.

Would he tell the House what his department is doing in order to ease the flow of information to youth?

Youth
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Northumberland
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for that very important question.

Under the national crime prevention strategy, we are supporting innovative projects across Canada that strive to foster resiliency in young people and allow them to participate more fully in our society.

In Hamilton for example, the Youth Truth Community Web Project is working with street kids and at-risk youth to develop employment and life skills. This is just one of over 2,500 projects we have supported under the national crime prevention strategy, an initiative that is helping our youth, helping our communities and helping us fulfill our commitments in this--

Youth
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Elk Island.

Committees of the House
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we saw an amazing spectacle in the House. In a desperate attempt to hang on to every vestige of power, the Prime Minister, the government House leader and the whip pulled all the strings they could to prevent MPs from actually being able to select the chairs and vice-chairs of committees.

It is widely expected that one of the backbenchers may become prime minister. Is it the Prime Minister's view that when a backbencher morphs into prime minister, he magically attains supreme wisdom, to know all things, with exclusive knowledge of who would be the best chair?

Committees of the House
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Minister of State and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member's House leader proposed a motion to the House yesterday. It has been deferred for a vote until next Tuesday.

I fail to understand why the hon. member has so little confidence in the motion proposed by his own House leader that he feels justified to artificially prop it up with the language he is using today.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, the government's ethics package is about as weak as a kitten. The package has taken nine years to come together and it is still almost toothless.

The Prime Minister chooses the ethics commissioner. The draft has loopholes big enough to drive a truck through and cabinet ministers, the source of most of the problems, are treated with kid gloves.

The Canadian people want transparency from government. The ethics package keeps cabinet business behind the closed doors of the PMO. When will the government bring forward legislation which will treat backbench MPs and cabinet ministers equally?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I do not know why the hon. member would believe that backbench MPs should have to meet the same standard of conduct as ministers. In fact, the code of conduct for public office holders is of course much more strict and contains a lot more disclosure requirements than will be the case under the proposed code for members of Parliament.

I fail to understand why he would want MPs to meet that higher standard when they have a lower obligation to the public given the role that they play.

Privacy
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Yves Rocheleau Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, a spokesperson from Canada Customs recently confirmed the government's intention to include in its megafile not only personal information on air passengers, but also on people who come to Canada on cruise ships, ferries, trains and even buses.

How can the government broaden the scope of its megafile when the privacy commissioner has already stated that he considers it illegal and feels that it will turn every citizen into a potential suspect?

Privacy
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan Minister of National Revenue

In fact, Mr. Speaker, the authority for the collection and sharing of data is contained in legislation of Parliament. I believe it was Bill S-23, an important piece of legislation that also requires guidelines and permits audits by the privacy commissioner.

We have achieved the appropriate balance under that legislation to ensure both the privacy protection and civil liberties of Canadians and at the same time to ensure the protection and security interests of Canadians. That is what the API program is all about.

Health
Oral Question Period

November 1st, 2002 / 11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Paddy Torsney Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, chronic diseases such as diabetes affect millions of Canadians and their families and result in a staggering number of deaths.

Could the Minister of Health tell the House what the Government of Canada is doing to improve the lives of Canadians suffering from chronic diseases?