House of Commons Hansard #41 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was kyoto.

Topics

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Charles Hubbard Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36, I have two petitions which are very similar to the ones already tabled in the House today.

The first deals with child pornography. The petitioners have a great concern that the government must take every action possible to preserve and prevent our children from being abused.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Charles Hubbard Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, my second petitions deals with embryonic stem cells. The petitioners ask that the concentration of study on stem cells should be on the basis of adult stem cells.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have four petitions to present today. The first one is on the release of the census records. The House has probably heard me speak about this before.

The petition contains 2,100 names. I have currently presented 17,000 names of people who would like to see the census released.

The petitioners are calling upon Parliament to take whatever steps necessary to retroactively amend the confidentiality clauses of the Statistics Act since 1906 to allow the release to the public, after a reasonable period of time, the post-1901 records.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, the next petition contains 960 names and concerns child pornography. The petitioners are concerned that the courts have not applied the current child pornography law in a way which makes it clear that such exploitation of children will always be met with swift punishment.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, the third petition contains 160 names and is on stem cell research. The petitioners are calling upon Parliament to focus its legislative support on stem cell research to find the cures and therapies necessary to treat the illnesses and diseases of suffering Canadians.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, the fourth petition, with approximately 100 names, concerns same sex marriages. The petitioners call upon Parliament to pass legislation to recognize the institution of marriage in federal law as being the lifelong union of one man and one woman to the exclusion of all others.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, I wish to present two petitions. The first petition concerns child pornography.

The petitioners say that the creation and use of child pornography is condemned by the clear majority of Canadians and that the courts have not applied the current child pornography law in a way which makes it clear that such exploitation of children will always be met with swift punishment.

The petitioners are asking for parliamentarians to protect children.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, the second petition that I wish to present has over 450 signatures so far. This one is with regard to the Bronze Star. It states that our Canadian troops fighting the war on terrorism have not received medals recognizing their heroic and meritorious achievement in battle because of bureaucratic delay.

The petitioners are calling upon the government to, without delay, remove the bureaucratic obstacles preventing our soldiers from being awarded the Bronze Star and the Bronze Star with distinction for their heroic performance in the war on terrorism.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions. The first petition is on the subject matter of stem cell research. The petitioners include constituents of mine from Mississauga South who share my view that human life begins at conception.

The petitioners would like to draw to the attention of the House that they support ethical stem cell research and that adult stem cell research has shown significant progress without the immune rejection problems or ethical problems associated with embryonic stem cells.

The petitioners therefore call upon Parliament to support legislative initiatives with regard to adult stem cell research to find the cures and therapies necessary for Canadians.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the second petition refers to the definition of marriage.

The petitioners would like to draw to the attention of the House that they believe that social matters or social policy should be decided by elected members of Parliament and not by the judiciary. They also support the current legal definition of marriage being the union of one man and one woman to the exclusion of all others.

The petitioners therefore call upon Parliament to use all possible legislative and administrative measures, including invoking the notwithstanding clause, section 33, if necessary, to preserve and protect the definition of marriage.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, you will recall that last week my hon. colleague from Delta--South Richmond rose on a point of order and asked about Question No. 17 regarding salmon farming.

In relation to that, if Questions Nos. 17 and 38 could be made orders for returns, these returns would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Question No. 17
Routine Proceedings

December 9th, 2002 / 3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John M. Cummins Delta—South Richmond, BC

With regard to the establishment of salmon farm operations in Canada's coastal waters and the requirements of the Fisheries Act and Navigable Waters Protection Act: ( a ) how many net pen salmon farm operations are located in the coastal waters adjacent to (i) British Columbia, (ii) New Brunswick, (iii) Nova Scotia, (iv) Prince Edward Island, and (v) Newfoundland; ( b ) what is the location and who is the owner or operator of each of these sites; ( c ) how many net cages are in operation, what is the weight or level of biomass and what is the annual amount of wastes or debris deposited on an annual basis at each site; ( d ) how many authorizations or approvals under section 5(1) of the Navigable Waters Protection Act have been issued for net pen salmon farm operations in the coastal waters adjacent to each of the provinces listed in part (a); ( e ) what is the location of each of these authorizations; ( f ) how many net cages were approved for each of these sites; ( g ) how many authorizations or approvals under section 5(1) of the Navigable Waters Protection Act have been denied for net pen salmon farm operations in the coastal waters adjacent to each of the provinces listed in part (a); ( h ) what is the location of the salmon farm applications that were denied; ( i ) how many net pen salmon farm operations have been established without first seeking the authorizations or approvals under section 5(1) of the Navigable Waters Protection Act for operations in the coastal waters adjacent to each of the provinces listed in part (a); ( j ) what is the location of each of these operations; ( k ) how many Ministerial orders have been issued under section 6 of the Navigable Waters Protection Act with regard to unauthorized salmon farm operations in the coastal waters adjacent to each of the provinces listed in part (a); ( l ) what is the location of each of these operations; ( m ) how many authorizations or approvals under section 35(2) of the Fisheries Act have been issued for net pen salmon farm operations in the coastal waters adjacent to each of the provinces listed in part (a); ( n ) what is the location of each of these authorizations under section 35 (2) of the Fisheries Act; ( o ) what is the approved weight or level of biomass and the approved annual amount of wastes or debris deposited on an annual basis at each site; ( p ) how many applications for authorizations or approvals under section 35(2) of the Fisheries Act have been denied for net pen salmon farm operations in the coastal waters adjacent to each of the provinces listed in part (a); ( q ) what is the location of the section 35(2) application for authorizations or approvals under the Fisheries Act for salmon farm operations that were denied; ( r ) how many net pen salmon farm operations have been established without first seeking the authorizations or approvals under section 35(2) of the Fisheries Act for operations in the coastal waters adjacent to the provinces listed in part (a); ( s ) what is the location of each of these operations; ( t ) how many orders under section 37(2) of the Fisheries Act have been issued requiring modifications, restrictions, or the closing of salmon farm operations that could result in harmful alteration to fish habitat, or the deposit of deleterious substances in the coastal waters adjacent to each of the provinces listed in part (a); and ( u ) what is the location for each site where an order was issued under section 37(2) of the Fisheries Act?

Return tabled.

Question No. 38
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Rajotte Edmonton Southwest, AB

For each year from 1993 to 2001, what was the total amount billed to the government and its agencies by: ( a ) Ipsos-Reid and its affiliates; and ( b ) the law firm, Stewart McKelvey Stirling Scales?

Return tabled.