House of Commons Hansard #148 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was competition.

Topics

2002 Winter Olympics
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is a wonderful moment when all members of the House agree that our Canadian athletes brought great honour and pride to all of us as Canadians in their performances and contributions to the success of the Olympics. They demonstrated what can be achieved through dogged determination, a high degree of self-discipline, impressive skills and outstanding teamwork. We need to learn from what we have seen them accomplish.

The sense of celebration was shared widely by Canadians. There was something symbolic about the feeling of pride that Canadians expressed so widely as we watched the wonderful accomplishments of those who won and those who simply contributed their best. For me it was a particular joy to watch the winning men's hockey game yesterday, after the thrill of the women's victory on Friday, with 190 men and women steelworkers who paused in the middle of a very important conference on human rights to join in that celebration. There was a great deal of talk about the great sense of loss of self-respect and sovereignty that so many Canadians have felt in past months because of recent events and decisions by the government.

Let us take the opportunity to build on the sense of pride and self-respect that we all celebrate in the aftermath of the Olympics and move forward with that. It is a moment for us to remember that amateur sports are an incredibly important part of community building. They are about athletics but they are also about community and solidarity building. Let us celebrate and move forward with that same spirit.

2002 Winter Olympics
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, I join others in the House in saluting the athletes, coaches and managers of Canada's Olympic teams. For two weeks they held us spellbound as they captured the imagination of the country. Time and again Canada held its collective breath watching seconds tick away as our athletes made that one last effort that would bring them to victory. We are immensely proud of every one of them. We are proud of their 17 medals and successes. Medals and winning are not the only things that count. We are especially proud of the way they conducted themselves no matter how trying or how controversial the circumstances.

Let us celebrate the huge effort put in by our athletes to bring to their country the greatest number of medals Canada has ever won at the Winter Olympic Games. The talent, determination, passion and great panache of our athletes have provided a window to the world for Canada, and the whole world has fallen in love with them. Canada could not have asked for better ambassadors.

I join with my colleagues, here in this House, and all Canadians, I am sure, to congratulate all the members of Canada's Olympic team and especially to thank them for representing so well the Canada that we have become. You have inspired all of Canada. The olympic spirit you carry within yourselves has made us realize how great it is to be Canadian, how proud we are of being Canadian.

Thanks again and congratulations.

Remembrance Day National Flag Act
Routine Proceedings

February 25th, 2002 / 3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Roy H. Bailey Souris—Moose Mountain, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-432, an act requiring the national flag of Canada to be flown at half-mast on Remembrance Day.

Mr. Speaker, in the environment of what is happening in the south and the great thrill that we have been talking about as Canadians, we should remember that 100,000 Canadians have spilled their blood across the world. The purpose of the bill is to remember and honour those 100,000 people by having the national flag of Canada flown at half-mast on all government buildings every November 11.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-433, an act to amend the Criminal Code (puppy mills).

Mr. Speaker, this bill is an amendment to the Criminal Code. It would, for emphasis, allow for a sentencing judge to take into consideration the horrific circumstances that exist when an individual engages in an activity that has become known colloquially as a puppy mill.

This does not have a friendly connotation by any means. It involves horrendous conditions that put cruel and unusual circumstances on any animal. Most often they are dogs and cats which are used for commercial production.

I want to thank my colleague from New Brunswick Southwest for seconding the bill. It would allow a judge, in my opinion, to send the proper message, one of deterrence, one of denunciation for horrific acts against animals. I would hope all members of the House would support the bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

The Speaker

The Chair has missed two items by calling the wrong order so we will go back to presenting reports from interparliamentary delegations.

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Oak Ridges
Ontario

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1) I have the honour to present two reports in both official languages.

The first is from the Canada-Japan Interparliamentary Group on the Chair's annual visit to diet members held in Tokyo, Japan in November 2001.

The other is the report of the 10th annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Parliamentary Forum held in Honolulu, Hawaii in January 2002.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, it is my honour to present a number of petitions with hundreds of signatures from people in my riding. The petition states that whereas, aboriginal people over the last two months have been netting--

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

Order. The hon. member for Yorkton--Melville knows that it is out of order to read petitions. He will want to give us a brief summary. I know he is always a stickler for compliance with the rules.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, I will briefly outline the substance of the petition.

A number of aboriginal people have been netting fish from a stocked lake in my area, Lake of the Prairies. These fish have been sold on the commercial market. The petitioners respect the aboriginal right to fish. However, Lake of the Prairies was built in the 1960s to act as a water reservoir and was stocked with fish for the benefit of all citizens to become an economic generator in that area.

The petitioners are asking that parliament enforce the laws of Canada so that those who take advantage of their status and breach federal laws be held accountable for their actions and that our government ensure that we have a single justice system for all citizens.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present a petition from citizens who are concerned about Antarctica. These citizens live in Peterborough, Lakefield, Curve Lake, Bailieboro, Ennismore, Toronto, Norwood, Cavan, Millbrook, North Monaghan and Douro.

The petitioners point out that Antarctica contains a pristine, scientifically valuable environment that needs protection. They point out that Canada, despite being a polar nation, lags behind many nations as far as the environmental initiatives in Antarctica are concerned.

The petitioners point out that the environmental protocol to the Antarctic treaty presents practical guidelines concerning environmental issues in Antarctica. They call upon parliament, as the parliament of a signatory country to the Antarctic treaty, to ratify all of the environmental protocol's guidelines into Canadian law.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following question will be answered today: No. 101.

Question No. 101—
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Does the government have a plan to increase the federal role in passenger train service, and in particular, what progress has been made on plans to return VIA service to Peterborough and other communities in Ontario?

Question No. 101—
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Chicoutimi—Le Fjord
Québec

Liberal

André Harvey Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

In April 2000, the government announced that it was providing VIA with approximately $402 million in new capital funding. This funding will enable VIA to revitalize its services through the acquisition of additional cars and locomotives to expand capacity, upgrading infrastructure to allow faster train speeds and increased frequencies on some routes in the Quebec-Windsor corridor, and refurbishing stations.

At the same time, VIA was asked to examine its system to determine if there was a business case for expanding its services. Last fall, VIA added a new Toronto-Kitchener frequency, extended a Toronto-Windsor train to Oshawa and extended a Montreal-Toronto train to Aldershot.

The Minister of Transport is presently awaiting a report from VIA on the feasibility of other service changes, including the introduction of service to Peterborough. VIA has met with interested parties such as the municipalities and the Canadian Pacific Railway, the owner of the track. The report will assess necessary capital investments and operating funding requirements as well as the degree of community support. Once the report is received, it will be carefully considered. As VIA’s operating funding has not been increased, the introduction of new service can only be considered if a business case has been demonstrated and if it will not require an increase in VIA’s current funding level.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if Question No. 102 could be made an order for return, the return would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?