House of Commons Hansard #131 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was copyright.

Topics

International Music Day
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Beauport—Montmorency—Côte-De- Beaupré—Île-D'Orléans, QC

Mr. Speaker, on this International Music Day, let us recall the history of music: from Gregorian chants to troubadours, from classical to contemporary, let us listen to music from all around the world and of every type.

Let us acknowledge that music has a constant presence in our lives, whether at a restaurant, in the car, at the shopping mall, at the dentist or anywhere else. Music is part of our daily lives and behind this music, first and foremost, are the artists who contribute to the musical wealth of Quebec's society.

To all you musicians, teachers of music at all levels, instrumentalists, and composers, thank you for allowing us to appreciate your art. You know how to touch our hearts and awaken our senses. Your harmonious melodies help us to discover our inner spirit and, to some extent, our spirituality.

Happy International Music Day.

Literacy
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, this year, Canada Post announced 32 winners of its Literacy Awards. These are the country's only national awards dedicated to recognizing grassroots literacy initiatives and to celebrating the achievements of learners and the people who help them along the way.

Recently, one of my constituents, Francine Guindon, won such an award. Ms. Guindon won the 2003 Individual Achievement Award in the French category in Quebec. She overcame social and economic obstacles by participating in the literacy program offered at the Centre d'éducation de base de l'Outaouais.

Congratulations to Francine Guindon. Her hard work is an example of courage and determination.

Women's History Month
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, October is Women's History Month. Through the hard work and determination of our foremothers, women in Canada today have access to higher education. They can work, earn money and own property. They have the right to vote and run for elected office.

Today when women stay home they do it by choice knowing they are valued at home or at work. We should never take these rights and liberties for granted.

Women's History Month is a time to encourage us to look back on our past and see how far women in the country have come. It is also a time to acknowledge that we still have far to go.

Today women represent 44% of income earners in Canada, yet continue to struggle with issues of equity. Women make up more than 50% of the population, yet hold only 21% of the seats in the House of Commons.

This year's theme, “What Do You Mean Women Couldn't Vote”, reminds us that gaining the right to vote must not be the final chapter in Canadian women's history. We must continue to ask: What is the most effective way to use that vote?

I ask all members to join with me this month as we celebrate the achievements of Canadian women. Let us keep up the fight.

Cancer Research
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Raymond Simard Saint Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to announce today that in my riding on Sunday, October 19 an amazing 10 year old student named Zoe Wreggitt is holding her fifth annual walkathon for cancer research.

In the last four years, Zoe has raised over $6,000 for the Canadian Cancer Society, of which $3,000 was raised last year. Her goal this year is to surpass the $4,000 mark. She has invited children from her community to join her in this extraordinary fundraising activity. The walkathon begins at her home and the participants walk around the block for one hour.

She is certainly an exceptional individual and was recognized as such by the Manitoba Teacher's Society which this past spring awarded Zoe the Young Humanitarian Award.

It is an honour for me as the member of Parliament for Saint Boniface to recognize this remarkable person who at such a young age has demonstrated the true art of giving.

I ask everyone to join me in congratulating and supporting Zoe in this unique endeavour.

Coast Guard
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John M. Cummins Delta—South Richmond, BC

Mr. Speaker, a fishing vessel out of Caraquet, New Brunswick went down early Monday morning. Two fishermen are presumed dead. The vessel was out in 50 knot winds and 20 to 30 foot seas near Anticosti Island.

The vessel's distress calls went unanswered because there was little or nor search and rescue coverage in the area at that time. Two search and rescue stations, Rivière-au-Renard and Saint-Pierre on Quebec's north shore, were not open as they had no staff and no vessels. This region has five relatively large vessels on the books. However three of the vessels were in the Arctic, one was in lay-up and the other was in dry dock for repairs.

Why was there no Coast Guard rescue capability in the area when it was obvious to everyone that a hurricane was on its way? Does the government not know that lack of coverage means no chance to save a life? It means loss of life.

The Liberal government has decimated the once proud Canadian Coast Guard search and rescue service since it came to office in 1993 and has put the lives of everyone on the water at risk, whether on the east or west coast.

Member for LaSalle—Émard
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Canadian Alliance

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we know that identity theft is a serious problem with the government. We have seen the problem in the revenue minister's department.

However we have a more serious example of identity theft. We apparently have someone running around the country saying that he is the prime minister and organizing first ministers meetings.

Does the Prime Minister think it is right that the new Liberal leader, someone he calls a mere backbencher in his government, would be setting a full first ministers conference for November 16?

Member for LaSalle—Émard
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, apparently there will be a number of them watching a football game and I hope it will be good. I hope the Alouettes will win but if it is Saskatchewan I might have second thoughts about it.

If he meets with the first ministers, it will be an occasion for the first ministers to show their shopping list for the budget of February 2004.

Member for LaSalle—Émard
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Canadian Alliance

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I am more concerned about the political footballs that are being pushed around.

The government has told us that the member for LaSalle—Émard is a mere backbencher. Now he is acting as the intergovernmental affairs minister, setting up his own federal-provincial conferences. He is not a minister, not the prime minister and he should not be doing this.

If this individual wants to act like the prime minister why is he not in the House of Commons answering questions on government business?

Member for LaSalle—Émard
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we had a vote yesterday and he voted with members of Parliament.

Other members of Parliament are not in their seats today. It is the right of members of Parliament to work at the same time when we have question period. I do not know why the member is so excited.

The problem is I know how disturbed the Leader of the Opposition is and I am about to become a marriage counsellor for him very soon.

Member for LaSalle—Émard
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Canadian Alliance

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I think the better marriage counsellor might be Aline but I will leave that to the Prime Minister's judgment.

The new Liberal leader might meet with the premiers. Yet according to the Prime Minister, the new leader is nothing more than a government backbencher.

Can the Prime Minister tell us whether he was invited to this meeting and whether, as Prime Minister, he intends to be there?

Member for LaSalle—Émard
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, yes, I was invited to the football game. The people of Saskatchewan, being very nice folks, have invited me. I have not reached a decision as yet.

If there are a lot of premiers there, I imagine ministers and MPs can see them at half time. Canadian football games are always interesting. One team will come out the champion. Will I be there? I do not know, but I have been invited. I thank the CFL for having extended the invitation.

Treasury Board
Oral Question Period

October 1st, 2003 / 2:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Coquitlam—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the President of the Treasury Board.

The Auditor General reports absolute system failure for public employees. In fact, she reports that the privacy commissioner abused funds, abused his employees and abused Parliament itself.

In view of this disaster, what steps has the President of the Treasury Board taken to get the money back, protect employees from abuse and protect Parliament from contempt?

Treasury Board
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, we have said that we are very distressed with the findings of the Auditor General and that we will implement each of the recommendations.

After the report of the government operations committee, we hired an outside consultant to look at the management practices and how we would implement each recommendation in co-operation with the interim commissioner, especially to recover funds for the performance management awards, the leave expenses and the hospitality and travel expenses. We will implement each recommendation.

Treasury Board
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Coquitlam—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, I hope, for implementation, the President of the Treasury Board has an internal policy memo for whistleblower protection.

The government House leader, way back in 1991, said “Public servants must be able to report about illegal or unethical behaviour that they encounter on the job without fear or reprisal”. That was 1991.

The Auditor General says that there was a reign of terror for employees and the minister's memo policy absolutely failed. That is all we have.

Instead of another research paper or another study group, will the government unequivocally commit to comprehensive, system wide whistleblower legislation?

Treasury Board
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of my government I will commit to do whatever we need to do to protect employees who disclose wrongdoings. We want employees to do that without fear of reprisals.

We will have recommendations in January 2004. I will expect parliamentarians to look at them and make final recommendations to the government.