House of Commons Hansard #145 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was pornography.

Topics

The Homeless
Statements By Members

October 28th, 2003 / 2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gérard Binet Frontenac—Mégantic, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada launched the National Homelessness Initiative in December 1999 to support communities in their activities to help homeless people. Building on the successes achieved by communities, the government announced $405 million over three years to continue its commitment to addressing homelessness

On October 23, 2003, the Minister of Labour and Federal Coordinator on Homelessness, went to Thetford Mines to announce $135,000 in funding for the Réseaux d'entraide Amiante organization.

The funding will help the organization purchase and renovate a building to meet the basic needs of the youth, including six supportive housing units as well as support and crisis intervention services.

Réseaux d'entraide Amiante will also organize activities that will stimulate the youth and will motivate them to take an active part in the community.

The Société d’habitation du Québec and the City of Thetford Mines are also providing funding. I have a great deal of respect for this type of partnership, which makes a difference in our communities.

Greece
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, on October 28, 1940, the Greek government refused demands from Nazi Germany to occupy Greece.

On October 28, 1940, Greece said no to Nazi Germany.

On October 28, 1940, Greece, this small country in the Mediterranean, entered World War II. Greece joined the Allied forces.

On behalf of the Canadian Alliance, the official opposition, I would like to commend all those who gave their lives for peace, justice and equality. Greeks fought in this terrible war alongside many Canadian troops.

Canadians of Greek origin remember this day as the day of Ohi . I would like to pay tribute to all the brave young soldiers who put their country ahead of everything else. Greece and Canada will always remember their fight for freedom.

National Library Day
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Eugène Bellemare Ottawa—Orléans, ON

Mr. Speaker, at the summit on school libraries held in Ottawa last June, Roch Carrier, National Librarian of Canada, proclaimed National Library Day as the fourth Monday in October to coincide with International Library School Day.

This year, the theme of International School Library Day is “Breaking Down Barriers”. This day highlights the importance of school libraries in overcoming the barriers that often prevent students from achieving their full potential.

School libraries give our young people an opportunity to become familiar with the process of seeking information through reading and research. They represent a investment that pays lifetime dividends for our youth.

The Government of Canada is proud to recognize the importance of school libraries in the education of our children.

Volunteers
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gary Schellenberger Perth—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, earlier this month I rose to support Bill C-325, a private member's bill that would have allowed volunteer emergency service workers, such as firefighters, to claim a much deserved tax credit in recognition of the tireless service they provide the community.

After spending 14 years as a volunteer fireman, I have a firsthand appreciation for the tremendous work these groups contribute to our society and know all too well how poorly these volunteers are compensated financially.

The Liberal government has greatly reduced services offered to Canadians and volunteers are being called upon to pick up the slack. It can be easy to forget just how many Canadians, especially in rural Canada, benefit from the service of volunteers.

I want to thank volunteer firefighters right across Canada who give of themselves in order that others may be helped. This was a good bill and should have been passed. I say shame on the government for voting against it.

Liberal Government
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Sébastien Gagnon Lac-Saint-Jean—Saguenay, QC

Mr. Speaker, ever since the Prime Minister announced his departure date, we have witnessed the total paralysis of the government. It is obvious that the reason for this paralysis is the existence of a parallel government working outside this House.

Ministers no longer even dare to take positions on the subjects addressed in the House for fear of displeasing the member for LaSalle—Émard. It goes without saying that this situation is totally unacceptable.

The democratic balance must be restored as quickly as possible. That is why we are asking all hon. members to vote in favour of our motion calling upon the Prime Minister to leave office as soon as possible after November 14, 2003.

That is the only way to restore real democracy for Quebeckers and all Canadians and in particular, the only way for the hon. member for LaSalle—Émard to shoulder all his responsibilities and, at last, become accountable to the people.

He must stop pulling the strings from behind the curtain and show his true face.

Landmines
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, as the House is well aware, the threat of landmines throughout the world is still causing great injury not only to military personnel but also to the civilian population.

Canada has always taken a lead role in the elimination of the use of landmines. Last night was one example of our efforts with the 3rd annual Senators Against Landmines: Night of a Thousand Dinners.

Cape Breton is also playing a role in eliminating the use of landmines with our own Canadian International Demining Corps under the leadership of Irving Schwartz. I would like to commend the Senators and the participants in last night's event for their contributions to this worthy cause.

I am also proud to recognize two fellow Cape Bretoners whose music is known nationally and internationally. In Ottawa today are fiddler Jerry Holland and piano player Robert Devaux who participated in the success of last night's event. These gentlemen have demonstrated how we can use our talents to make an impact on such a noble cause.

Acadian Community
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

Mr. Speaker, with the 400th anniversary of the founding of Acadia and the third Congrès mondial acadien fast approaching, we have a duty to draw attention to the important contribution made by Acadians to the founding of Canada.

The Acadians' ancestors from France, the mother country, were among the first European colonists in Canada. As a result, the Acadian culture has made an important contribution to Canadian history and is most definitely an important part of the cultural mosaic of this country.

Because of the importance of this 400th anniversary, the Acadian people want to share this major event with all of Canada.

I am therefore joining my voice with the Acadian people and the Société nationale de l'Acadie in calling upon the Canadian government to officially recognize 2004 as the Year of Acadia.

Landmines
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Christian Jobin Lévis-Et-Chutes-De-La-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, November 6 will be the Night of a Thousand Dinners.

This is an international event to increase public awareness of the dangers of landmines and to raise funds for their removal and for assistance to survivors.

The idea is a simple one. A person hosts a dinner for family or friends. Instead of bringing wine or flowers, each guest makes a donation to mine action.

I would like to congratulate Senator Hubley, who hosted one such dinner last night. The Night of a Thousand Dinners gives us an opportunity to do something that will produce results.

Landmines are a very important world issue. On behalf of the Canadian government, I invite everyone to get involved in this cause. The Night of a Thousand Dinners is an enjoyable way to do something useful.

Member for LaSalle--Émard
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, while Canadians are unsure if they should support a government led by the former finance minister, they are right to ask themselves some questions.

If he does not support the proposed changes to aboriginal governance, what changes does he support? If he does not like the way the Kyoto agreement was foisted on the provinces and Canadian industry, what is his alternative? If he does not like the recent announcement of $700 million for VIA Rail, what exactly are his transportation priorities? If he is unhappy with the results of the same sex marriage debate, why does he say he will do whatever the courts tell him? Why does he promise cuts to all government departments one day, but assure people that there will be no cuts to programs the next? Why does he hold first ministers conferences, promise disaster relief money, chastise the current Prime Minister over foreign policy decisions, and generally usurp the authority of the current government, yet he is not available to the House to be accountable for his parallel government?

Canadians ask themselves these questions and others because they cannot ask them of the former finance minister. That is simply wrong, and that is why all members of Parliament should vote in favour of the motion to transfer authority and, more important, accountability as soon as possible.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Canadian Alliance

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, while the Prime Minister was out of town, he will know that the labour minister apologized for unethical behaviour, the environment minister has apologized, and the industry minister has apologized and asked the ethics counsellor to revisit his actions. However, the Prime Minister floats into town today and says apparently that he thinks he has the right to go to the Irving lodge whenever he feels like it.

Is the Prime Minister reneging on the apologies? Is he actually saying that his ministers' behaviour is acceptable?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I said that I put in place a process that did not exist. Ministers, as members of Parliament, have the right to accept an invitation to dinner or to sleep at a place. If they have doubts, they go to the ethics counsellor who gives them advice on whether it is the right thing, yes or no. The system did not exist before.

What I asked was, is that type of problem the biggest problem of the nation? They have all done the right thing; they went to the ethics counsellor and reported publicly.

I have been around the world and on returning to Canada I realize that the only thing that the opposition has in mind is to try to destroy the reputations of all the politicians. I think that the government--

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Leader of the Opposition.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Canadian Alliance

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, if the Prime Minister wants us to deal with bigger issues, then give us the leader who has the mandate to deal with them, which is the new leader.

I invite the Prime Minister to take a look at section 20 of his code of conduct. I will read it for the Prime Minister:

Gifts...including those described in section 21 that could influence public office holders...shall be declined.

This refers to gifts of over $200.

Does the Prime Minister have trouble understanding his own code of ethics?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I just said that there is a code that everyone follows. If a person has doubts, they should consult the ethics counsellor, who will indicate whether the situation is acceptable or not.

When I hear that the interim leader of the official opposition revealed the source of only 13% of the contributions he received when he ran for leader of his party, I think he has some nerve standing in this House and pointing the finger at people on this side.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Canadian Alliance

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the industry minister apparently was given guidelines by the ethics counsellor. He chose to ignore them anyway and now he is going back to him. I guess that is how it works over there.

The Prime Minister seems okay with these ethical lapses. There is a code of conduct. There are clear guidelines. There are not supposed to be any gifts over $200.

I ask the Prime Minister, could he tell the House what undeclared gifts over $200 he has accepted?