House of Commons Hansard #20 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was victims.

Topics

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is not just beef producers that are suffering from the Liberal insults to the Americans, but dairy producers as well. Will pork or poultry producers, or agri-food processors soon also have to pay the price for the Liberal caucus insults?

In his infamous announcement on September 10, why did the minister ignore the dairy producers?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, anything but. The reality is that the September 10 announcement provides additional support for creating increased slaughter capacity. The reality is that through the various programs the federal government working with the provinces have provided for those involved in the beef industry, there has been a little over $2 billion in support.

As I have said, there are issues in terms of the dairy industry and we are in fact working on those.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, the U.S. border has now been closed to the trade of live Canadian cattle for 531 days. The government's inaction and failure to open the border has forced the Canadian Cattlemen for Fair Trade to file a chapter 11 claim under NAFTA.

I ask the agriculture minister, when will his government take responsibility, stand with the cattle industry and file challenges at the WTO and under chapter 20 of NAFTA?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, unlike the hon. member across the way, I am interested in getting the border open, not in creating a legal process that may go on for years and years and years. Our intention is to have the border opened.

The reality is that we have not ignored cattle producers. In fact, $2.1 billion between the provincial and federal governments is flowing to beef producers. Also, on September 10 we made an announcement that will work toward ensuring that the industry can be profitable with or without a border opening.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

John Duncan Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government continues to bungle Canada-U.S. relations. This puts Canadians and our $3 billion softwood cash deposits at risk.

There are reports from industry that the minister wants to initiate softwood discussions with his U.S. counterparts starting tomorrow. The industry is still waiting for the minister to call a stakeholders meeting to develop a Canadian consensus prior to entering into any negotiations.

Why is the minister so anxious to move tomorrow when he has done nothing for months?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, that is absolute nonsense. I have been in constant touch with the industry and meeting with stakeholders right across this country. For his information, a meeting is being held next week.

Having said that, we will continue our two-track policies in terms of the softwood lumber dispute. We will continue to litigate before the WTO and the NAFTA. We will stand ready to negotiate, but only an agreement which is in the best interests of all Canadian stakeholders.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Edmonton—Spruce Grove, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canadian lumber producers are trying to survive in an increasingly hostile environment caused by rising fuel costs and a stronger Canadian dollar. In the meantime, the Liberals continue to insult our best clients and our producers are paying the price for this bad behaviour.

Is the government waiting for the result of the U.S. election to finally defend the interests of Canadian exporters?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, absolutely not. We have not been waiting for the outcome of the election. We have stood ready at any moment to stand behind our softwood lumber industry. As a matter of fact, that is why we brought in an aid package of $356 million. This is why we continue to work with the industry organizations as we pursue our legal outcomes in the WTO and the NAFTA. This is why we will continue to work with the industry groups and the workers affected, in order to effect a just outcome.

Ukraine
Oral Question Period

November 2nd, 2004 / 2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Borys Wrzesnewskyj Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

This past Sunday, the first round of the presidential election in Ukraine took place. Canadian observers alone have documented over 500 cases of state intimidation, disruption of opposition campaigns, the use of state resources for one candidate, and the prevention of civil society observation. Also, quite threatening for Ukraine sovereignty was the direct interference in the campaign by Russian President Putin.

The OSCE and the Council of Europe stated that “With a heavy heart, we have to conclude that this election did not meet...standards for democratic elections. Consequently, this election process--”

Ukraine
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Foreign Affairs may want to comment.

Ukraine
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Papineau
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we are of course quite encouraged that the voting was carried out in a peaceful manner.

That being said, the Ukrainian authorities should ensure that the serious problems encountered in the first round of vote counting should be resolved by the time the second round is being held.

We also call on all parties to continue to campaign peacefully and to reject any calls for violence. The campaigning and the voting in the second round must be free of intimidation or harassment.

Automobile Industry
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, on October 21, 2002, I asked the then Minister of Industry when the government was going to act on an auto policy for Canadians. I was told at that time to wait for the Canadian Auto Partnership Council's report.

I asked the same question and got the same answer on November 25 and December 12, 2002, October 23, 2003, April 19 and May 13, 2004, basically blaming CAPC for the wait.

The government has used this as a political shield for the auto industry and the issues we need to deal with right now. The shield is gone. When will the government act? We are waiting for an answer.

Automobile Industry
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway
B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I am meeting with the CAPC committee tomorrow. We will be discussing their report, discussing their recommendations.

Over the next couple of weeks we will be putting together the final touches on an automotive industry strategy for all of Canada.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Bill Siksay Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government has failed to implement the merit-based refugee appeal division provided for in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

In response to sanctuary situations, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration has suggested that churches accept a mechanism for a ministerial review for only around 12 failed refugee cases a year.

Why is the minister presuming to limit the carefully considered justice actions of churches while at the same time showing contempt of Parliament by refusing to implement the refugee appeal division proposed by the government and passed by this House?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Judy Sgro Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, let me just read part of a letter from the Anglican Church of Canada.

Archbishop Hutchison, who attended that meeting, said:

We were very appreciative of your offer of an interim solution to address the issue of failed convention refugee claimants who are currently residing in churches in Canada. It is our belief that this offer was extended in good faith and it was received that way.

It was gratifying to know that you see us as important partners in addressing refugee issues, and we look forward to continuing our dialogue together in the future as you move forward on refugee reform.