House of Commons Hansard #20 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was victims.

Topics

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Vic Toews Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, this Liberal administration is famous for its ability to aggravate our billion dollar a day trade relationship with the United States. The proposal to decriminalize marijuana continues with this Liberal tradition.

Has the justice minister received guarantees from his American counterparts that Canada will not experience adverse trade ramifications as a result of his marijuana proposals?

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I have spoken with my counterpart, the Attorney General in the United States. He fully understands that this is not a case of the legalization of marijuana. It is, and will remain, illegal under the new legislation.

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Vic Toews Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, he still has not answered the question.

What guarantees have the Americans made that it will not aggravate the trade relationship, which the government continues to aggravate?

The underground marijuana trade between Canada and the U.S. is already $4 billion a year. What assurances and what guarantees can the minister make that decriminalization will not result in a worsening of our trade? How will he guarantee Canadian jobs?

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I answered the question. He obviously did not like it, but the Attorney General had no problem with it.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Okanagan—Coquihalla, BC

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to banning terrorist organizations it is simply a matter of historical fact that this government is notoriously slow. Many times, long after our allies have banned specific organizations, our government appears dazed, confused, dragging its feet, and sending a signal that it is reluctant to move swiftly on terrorist organizations.

Why is the government maintaining this go-slow policy when it comes to naming terrorist organizations? Are they afraid of the terrorists, or are they simply delinquent when it comes to national and international security?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as I think the hon. member knows, there is a process in place, and that process is followed. We assess the risk on a daily basis in relation to groups who might in fact be carrying on activities in this country that might cause either Canadians or others harm.

However, I want to respond to the specific question the hon. member asked yesterday in relation to a group, the JTJ. I want to reassure the member that on October 18 of this year Canada listed the JTJ, and the appropriate freezing orders to all financial institutions were made.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Okanagan—Coquihalla, BC

Mr. Speaker, we have been asking for some time for that to happen. In a rare moment, I want to say thank you for finally following through.

It still brings us down to this point: that these things happened long after the United States and our allies named this group. This group was a threat to the United States, a threat to Great Britain, a threat to Israel, and long after we continued to have this policy of going slow.

We want to know if there will be a change to that. Who is it that these people are afraid of offending, our allies or the terrorists?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, let me again reassure the hon. member in relation to the JTJ. The JTJ was first listed by the United Nations Security Council as being associated with Osama bin Laden. Such measures by the UN are automatically incorporated into Canadian law by virtue of Canada being a member state of the United Nations.

That is exactly what happened in this case. In fact, we acted expeditiously in this case, and we act expeditiously in relation to any threat or risk to the safety of this country.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, the federal government is demanding that provincial governments repay any overpayment in respect of fiscal equalization, based on the periodic adjustment of the parameters in the formula. Last year, Quebec was billed for an amount of $1.2 billion by the federal government. In October 2004, Saskatchewan was billed for $590 million in equalization adjustments.

Could the Minister of Finance tell us whether, like Quebec, Saskatchewan will be allowed to repay this overpayment over a certain period and, if so, over how many years?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the government announced during the course of the summer that we were putting two floors under the equalization program for this year: floor number one to ensure that the amount of money available would be at least $10 billion, and floor number two to ensure that provinces could rely upon the forecasts that were given to them in the month of February. Both of those floors are effective. They benefit both the province of Quebec and the province of Saskatchewan, as well as all of the other equalization receiving provinces.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister did not answer my question.

I asked him if Saskatchewan would have to repay the $590 million and whether an installment payment was agreed upon, like it was with Quebec, which will have five years to repay. Over the weekend, La Presse carried an article by Robert Dutrisac saying that, according to a reliable source, Saskatchewan, unlike Quebec, would not be required to repay the $590 million equalization overpayment.

Will he confirm or deny this piece of information?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, all provinces under the two floors are being treated in exactly the same way for fiscal year 2004-05. That was thoroughly discussed at the meeting on equalization not long ago.

I point out that as late as today I was in conversation with the Government of Quebec in terms of the arrangements it would like in terms of smoothing out the impact of equalization on that province. I believe we have arrived at a solution that is entirely satisfactory to the Government of Quebec.

Automobile Industry
Oral Question Period

November 2nd, 2004 / 2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Colin Carrie Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government's plan to adopt the Kyoto protocol will spell disaster for Canada's automotive industry. Even the government's own forecasting shows that adopting Kyoto could result in the loss of 80,000 automotive jobs, mostly in Ontario.

Why does the government insist upon unrealistic goals and policies that will decimate the automotive industry in Canada?

Automobile Industry
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Richmond Hill
Ontario

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, sometimes in politics it is better to be a good listener than a talker. Unfortunately, the member has not been listening to what the government has been saying about working collaboratively with various stakeholders, including the auto industry.

In fact this morning I met with members of the auto industry. I can assure members that what the minister has said about sustainability and about competitiveness and the environment is good for everyone. We are going to move ahead in that direction. I would ask the member to work with us.

Automobile Industry
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Colin Carrie Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, the truth is that the government seems to be doing a lot of talking, but it is clear it is not listening to the auto industry. The Liberal government has stampeded away our cattle industry, and now it threatens to drive away our auto industry.

The time for talk is over. Why has the Liberal government put 80,000 automotive jobs at risk?