House of Commons Hansard #141 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was industry.

Topics

Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-430, An Act to amend the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act and the Special Import Measures Act.

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to be introducing a bill to amend the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act and the Special Import Measures Act, mainly so that trade unions representing workers engaged in the production of goods affected by dumping or subsidizing can request inquiries. This is currently prohibited.

By introducing this bill, the Bloc Québécois seeks to correct this grave injustice, at a time when globalization is threatening many of our jobs such as those in the bicycle, textile or furniture industries. With regard to the last example, I condemn the closure of the Shermag plant in Victoriaville. From now on, we want consideration for job protection.

Finally, I want to thank the member for Joliette for his assistance in preparing this important bill, which, if passed, will have a positive impact on thousands of vulnerable jobs.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Yellowhead, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-431, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.

Mr. Speaker, it is a privilege to introduce this private member's bill that would amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act so that we send a message about the substances that are on schedule 1. I assume those substances will be changed according to the government's announcement this year which would add methamphetamine to the schedule 1 group of substances, which would include heroin and cocaine.

The possession of those drugs come with a lifetime sentence as a maximum but they have no minimum. My bill would make it a minimum of two years for a first offence and five years for a second offence. This would send a message to our courts that we need a minimum sentence and that we need to take these kinds of incidents seriously. It also sends a message to our communities that we are prepared to stand before them and protect them from the criminals who are involved with these kinds of substances. It would also for trafficking, importation and exportation.

As well, the bill talks about when the methamphetamine labs are in the vicinity of underage children that they will be recognized in the court of law.

Those are the two ingredients in the bill. I encourage all members to support this private member's bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Conservative

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, there have been consultations between all parties and I think you would find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move:

That, when private members' business is called later today, the motion for second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-271, an act to amend the Income Tax Act (tuition credit and education credit), be deemed moved by the member for Westlock—St. Paul and seconded by the member for Cariboo—Prince George.

For clarification, the sponsor of the motion, the member for Westlock—St. Paul, would retain the right to speak again for not more than five minutes at the conclusion of the second hour of debate or earlier if no other member rises in debate pursuant to Standing Order 95(1).

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

(Motion agreed to)

U.S. Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Rivière-Du-Loup—Montmagny, QC

Mr. Speaker, I believe that you will find unanimous consent for the following motion, which I am moving in cooperation with colleagues from all the other parties. The motion reads as follows:

That, in the opinion of this House, the United States government should reject the possibility of having a mandatory requirement that American and Canadian citizens present their passport when crossing the Canadian-American border.

U.S. Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?

U.S. Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

U.S. Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

U.S. Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

(Motion agreed to)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

October 25th, 2005 / 10:10 a.m.

Conservative

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, as I have been doing at every opportunity this fall, it is again my pleasure to present a petition, this one on behalf of citizens from Dorchester, Ingersol, Guelph, Ajax, London, Pickering, all from Ontario, and Saint-Léonard and Lachine from the province of Quebec.

All of the citizens wish to draw to the attention of the House that every year there are about 2,000 young children adopted from foreign countries and brought to our land. In spite of the fact that other nations, specifically the United States of America and Great Britain, grant automatic citizenship for these young children, our country does not.

Therefore the petitioners call upon Parliament to immediately enact legislation to grant automatic citizenship to those minors adopted from other countries by Canadian citizens with this citizenship being immediately granted upon the finalization of the adoption.

I note that the Minister for Citizenship and Immigration has committed to the Canadian people to introduce stand alone legislation to accomplish this, and I would hope that he would do it post-haste.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Bloc

Roger Clavet Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, like other of my colleagues in the Bloc Québécois, I am extremely pleased today to present a petition in favour of maintaining postal operations in Quebec City.

You can see the size of the petition. It has been signed by 130,000 people who oppose the closure of the postal sorting facility in Quebec City. They call for mail processing operations to be maintained in our regions, and for the related jobs to be maintained as well.

It is with great honour and pleasure that I am today presenting a portion of the petition, signed by several thousand people.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Bloc

Guy Côté Portneuf, QC

Mr. Speaker, like my colleague from Louis-Hébert, I am pleased today to present a portion of the 130,000 signatures on a petition opposing the closure of the Quebec City postal sorting centre. The people in the Quebec City region are justifiably concerned. We can only hope that the government and Canada Post will heed these 130,000 citizens this time.