House of Commons Hansard #158 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farm.

Topics

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's South, NL

Mr. Speaker, this is the peak time when people are applying for unemployment insurance benefits. It is also approaching Christmas. Instead of a four or five week wait, which is too long anyway, they are now waiting eight to ten weeks. These facts and figures are coming right from the minister's own department.

Every other province has received either overtime benefits or extra staff. Why is the government discriminating against Newfoundland and Labrador?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Liberal

Belinda Stronach Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and Minister responsible for Democratic Renewal

Mr. Speaker, let me assure the House that all available employees are assigned to the processing of claims to minimize the wait times and to ensure cheques go to those employees who have filed for EI claims.

Cultural Diversity
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Marc Godbout Ottawa—Orléans, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the Minister of Canadian Heritage for her excellent work in connection with cultural diversity at UNESCO. Unlike the party over the way, she does more than talk; she has acted and achieved some concrete results.

In a world context as favourable as this, our artists cannot help but flourish, and yet the minister has done still more for the cultural community.

Can she tell the House how she will be supporting our country's artists more than ever through the Canada Council for the Arts?

Cultural Diversity
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber
Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla Minister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

It is true that this was a historic week for culture. First of all, our government announced that it was doubling the budget of the Canada Council for the Arts, to $300 million. This is particularly good because of the Council's upcoming 50th anniversary in 2007. What is more, Canada has become the first country to ratify the Convention on Cultural Diversity, as promised.

We therefore have every reason to rejoice at these two announcements because this is, to quote the MAL, the Quebec movement for arts and letters, a stunning, total collective victory.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Larry Miller Grey—Bruce—Owen Sound, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister in his role as finance minister took over $25 billion out of health care. Last May the Chippewas of Nawash were told that there was no money available to grant their application for $250,000 to provide health care for their community.

In its recent mad dog spending spree, the government has announced billions in bogus promises for every group in the country. Why are the Chippewas of Nawash being left out?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

West Nova
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Robert Thibault Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, members will remember that the first ministers and the Prime Minister met with the leaders of the native community and negotiated some extra funding for health care. These very same leaders are meeting at the present hour I believe. The funding is available. The Government of Canada is working with the communities, directly getting to the needs in those communities, and we will continue to work in that direction.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Helena Guergis Simcoe—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday a Make Poverty History witness stated at committee that the democratic deficit of the government goes much deeper than anyone had thought. Just two days after the Auditor General reported how the government took $69 million in matching funds money and spent it on non-tsunami programs. The Auditor General also stated that $30 million for debt relief in tsunami countries never retired one dime of debt.

What did the Liberals spend the money on, and when are they going to report to Parliament and repay this money like the Auditor General has recommended?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Barrie
Ontario

Liberal

Aileen Carroll Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I have to share with the House how proud CIDA was to read chapter 8 of the Auditor General's report, to have her tell Canadians how accountable we were in our response to tsunami, and how flexible we were under the pressure of that incredible horror.

I would also share with the hon. member that the $69 million is merely a marginal transfer from one fiscal year to another. The $69 million will be spent on the reconstruction of tsunami affected--

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Châteauguay—Saint-Constant.

Health
Oral Questions

November 25th, 2005 / 11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Denise Poirier-Rivard Châteauguay—Saint-Constant, QC

Mr. Speaker, Salvia divinorum is a hallucinogenic plant sold legally across the country. This substance, banned in Australia, Italy, Finland and Denmark, causes hallucinations and may cause mental health problems in those who use it.

Can the Minister of Health tell us why this hallucinogenic substance is still not controlled in Canada and is freely sold and readily available in ordinary stores?

Health
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

West Nova
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Robert Thibault Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I am sorry, but with so much muttering and yelling from the members opposite I did not hear the first part of the question. Nonetheless, I have noted this question and the Minister of Health will be pleased to give the hon. member a complete response.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the hon. Minister of Foreign Affairs.

The people of Haiti are still suffering despite the help of several countries including ours. Has the minister recently announced additional help or will he do so in order to provide the Haitian population with all the help Canada can offer to the poorest country in our hemisphere?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

Noon

Papineau
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, this morning, together with my colleagues responsible for international cooperation, and the Francophonie, and with our special advisor to Haiti, we have announced a new contribution of $33 million for Haiti. This contribution will be used essentially to support projects aimed at security sector reform, social and economic reconstruction, reconciliation and the resumption of the democratic process.

We are also proud to work with the many organizations in Canada and with the Haitian diaspora that will see these projects through.

Canada will support Haitians as long as it takes.

FedNor
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Tony Martin Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the minister responsible for FedNor. Yesterday he was in Sault Ste. Marie and made the very important announcement of a new $7 million waterfront research facility for fisheries and oceans. It was a much anticipated announcement and I wish I could have been there to celebrate with him.

The announcement yesterday missed one key piece: a new invasive species management centre to coordinate national efforts to combat invasive alien species threats and make Canada a world leader in invasive alien species management issues. Species such as the Asian longhorned beetle and emerald ash borer threaten domestic biosecurity. Projected annual losses of $13 billion to $34.5 billion--

FedNor
Oral Questions

Noon

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency.