House of Commons Hansard #60 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

Parental Leave
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, the government has been very supportive of the negotiations with the Government of Quebec with respect to parental leave. Our current offer is financially much more advantageous than the offer of 1997. We have high hopes of a successful conclusion to these negotiations.

Parental Leave
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, an agreement with Quebec is still $275 million away. Since 1996, no less than four federal ministers and four Quebec provincial ministers have attempted to negotiate a parental leave agreement, but without success. The ministers may change, but what does not change is the federal government's refusal to negotiate an agreement that satisfies Quebec. The deadline is today.

Can the minister tell us—yes or no—if an agreement has finally been reached with Quebec?

Parental Leave
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, as I said, we have been very supportive of the negotiations and we know the negotiations are reaching a critical stage. We believe our offer will allow the Government of Quebec to develop its own program. We are looking forward to a successful conclusion to the negotiations.

Parental Leave
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Yves Lessard Chambly—Borduas, QC

Mr. Speaker, as we see, they have many excuses for delaying the signature of the agreement on parental leave. When it is not the legal aspects, it is the financial questions that pose a problem. Fewer excuses were found when they had to reach an agreement with Newfoundland and Labrador and Nova Scotia on natural resources.

How can they be so quick to transfer billions of dollars to Newfoundland and Labrador and Nova Scotia, and still refuse to return $275 million to Quebec for parental leave?

Parental Leave
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, our objective in these negotiations is to reach a fair and equitable solution, a solution that will help the parents of the province of Quebec, and we have every hope we will reach such a solution.

Parental Leave
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Yves Lessard Chambly—Borduas, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is a rather questionable answer. What is at stake here is the establishment of the parental leave system on January 1, 2006. On the eve of the last election campaign, there was supposedly an agreement. And yet things are still dragging on.

Can the minister tell the House how many Quebec ministers it will take before the government's representatives keep their promises?

Parental Leave
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, as I said, we are very conscious of the fact that these negotiations have reached a very important stage. They have been conducted in good faith. Our offer has been an excellent one. We believe there is a solution that will be good for the Government of Canada and, in particular, good for the parents of the province of Quebec.

Health
Oral Question Period

February 18th, 2005 / 11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health.

As he will know, his predecessor encouraged experiments with credit card medicine, such as Ralph Klein's credit card hospitals in Alberta and now the $2,000-a-knee operation in Montreal. During the election, the Prime Minister asked people to vote Liberal to stop credit card medicine.

What does the health minister intend to do to stop credit card medicine in Montreal?

Health
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, first, we will be providing $41 billion over the next 10 years in additional money to all of the provinces to ensure there is public health care and public delivery.

Second, we shall be enforcing the Canada Health Act evenly right across the country, without exception.

Health
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

That is another non-answer, Mr. Speaker.

When he was a New Democrat, he could make up his mind about privatization. Now he has caught the dithers. I asked a very simple question and want a simple answer.

For two elections the Liberals have pretended to oppose credit card medicine. We have credit card medicine all over the place. Will the minister either finally admit that the Liberals will do nothing to stop credit card medicine or announce what action they will take in Montreal to protect patients' pocketbooks?

Health
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, perhaps the hon. member needs a better hearing aid. I did answer the question.

I said that we support public health. We will be supporting it with $41 billion over the next 10 years in additional money. We shall enforce the Canada Health Act right across the country, without exception.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Conservative

Jeff Watson Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister embarrassed Canada by saying that the illegal Syrian occupation of Lebanon is necessary “to keep the peace”. This strange statement is actually consistent with the government's track record.

Five years ago, Prime Minister Chrétien said that Syrian troops were welcome in Lebanon. He met Hezbollah leader, Sheik Nasrallah, defended a Syrian backed terrorist organization and the government shovelled $26 million in aid to Syria.

Is it not true that the Prime Minister's statement yesterday actually reflects longstanding Liberal policy to tolerate Syrian occupation in Lebanon?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, it was made absolutely clear yesterday by both the Prime Minister and the Minister of Foreign Affairs that Canada supports the United Nations resolution 1559. We have supported that resolution since its passage by the UN. That resolution indicates that Syria should withdraw from Lebanon. That is the Canadian government's position. It always has been and it continues to be.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Conservative

Rahim Jaffer Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister embarrassed Canada by saying that Syria's illegal occupation of Lebanon was necessary for keeping the peace. Such bizarre comments are par for the course in the Liberal camp. Five years ago, Jean Chrétien said that the Syrian troops were welcome in Lebanon. He had met with Sheikh Nasrallah from Hezbollah, a terrorist organization.

In his statement yesterday, why did the Prime Minister uphold the Liberal tradition of tolerance toward the Syrian occupation of Lebanon?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Pickering—Scarborough East
Ontario

Liberal

Dan McTeague Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the House has heard the comments by the member for Edmonton—Strathcona, but it has also heard the comments and the response by the Prime Minister, as well as the Minister of Foreign Affairs, to the questions asked.

It seems that the hon. member does not understand the response, and yet it is simple. We, as a Parliament, as a government, support Resolution 1559. We call for the withdrawal of Syria from Lebanon. Period.