House of Commons Hansard #60 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was federal.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the environment ministry has had eight years to come up with a plan for Kyoto and yet it has done nothing. There is no plan, just empty rhetoric.

Canadian air pollution levels have dramatically increased while the Liberal government does nothing. Four months ago I met with the minister about air pollution levels in the Fraser Valley. He had a chance to stand up against a proposed U.S. polluter 500 metres from the Canadian border but again did nothing.

When will he secure a cross-border agreement on air pollution and when will we see the Kyoto plan?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member may easily have the Kyoto plan: it is public. It was done in 2002. But we will improve it. We will have an improved plan so compelling that I will be very pleased to hear the reaction of the opposition. I will be very pleased to discuss the Kyoto plan with them. Then we will see how much they do not care about the environment.

The opposition has not been able to come forward with one request in this budget for the environment. The opposition does not give a damn about it, and the last ones who would like to see negotiations with the United States would be the members of that party.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Conservative

Brian Jean Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, in English we say dithering is a contagious Liberal minister disease. Yesterday, Mr. John Bennett, a director of the Sierra Club, testified that Canada cannot possibly meet its international legal obligations without giving billions of tax dollars to developing countries to purchase clean air credits under Kyoto.

How can Canadians have any trust in the Liberal government as it takes our taxes and burns them up in the smokestacks in overseas factories that we paid for as Canadian taxpayers? If the biggest proponents of Kyoto do not buy the Liberal snake oil any longer, why should other Canadians?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, it would be a terrible mistake if Canada was not doing its best to become the leader of this growing market that exists about trading emissions. All the other countries would be there and we would not be there. Most of our friends will be, and Canada, when we do something abroad, it will be to help the planet. It will be to have a strong showcase for Canadian technology and Canadian services for the environment.

We will do it despite the opposition, which does not understand the link between the environment and the economy. The opposition does not understand that in global warming there is the word “global”.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Charlevoix—Montmorency, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment is trying to sound reassuring, saying that Quebec will not have to assume more than its share in achieving the Kyoto objectives, since a large part of the effort will focus on hydrocarbons and there are not many of those in Quebec.

How can the minister state so categorically that everyone will do their part, when there is no plan on which the targets to be met by major polluters can be based? The minister has no plan or objectives, but swears that everyone will do their part. When will the minister stop indulging in wishful thinking?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the toughened plan to be announced will clearly state that everyone is expected to do their part. I will be able to discuss it with the hon. member at that time. I am sure that he will come, very politely and positively, to the conclusion that this is a plan that Quebeckers and Canadians in general can work with to help the planet face a serious problem where petty politics has no place.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Charlevoix—Montmorency, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment may improvise all he wants and make one reassuring statement after the other, he still cannot deny that his plan for implementing the Kyoto protocol is a virtual plan with no substance.

Will the minister face the facts and admit that, without a plan, his promises are nothing more than hot air?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, speaking of air, I can promise that we will do a lot in the area of wind energy. That is for sure. We will be more than ever champions in that area.

I can also tell the hon. member that the rest of the world does not view Canada as hot air. Pressure has been put on us to agree to host in Montreal one of the biggest conferences on climate ever held. We shall see, then, how much other countries rely on Canada, a united Canada. Because, when they are united, Canadians accomplish great things.

Child Care
Oral Question Period

February 18th, 2005 / 11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, last Wednesday, the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development exhibited, not inconsistency, but definite confusion, in stating that a foundation was required in order to transfer the funding for child care to Quebec with no strings attached.

How can the government sanction such a statement from the minister, when we are well aware that there have been transfers of funds in the past, for manpower for instance, without any need of a foundation?

Child Care
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud that in the budget to follow next week as promised we will deal with the issues related to child care. We will do so in a way that helps parents and children across this country. I think the hon. gentleman should wait for next week to see the exact mechanism we choose to deliver.

Child Care
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Social Development, the one who wanted to answer the previous question. The one who claims to have children's interests at heart.

Is the one who claims to want to avoid bureaucratic wrangling prepared to sign an agreement quickly, like the one signed for health, which would allow the funding to be transferred to Quebec for child care, with no strings attached?

Child Care
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Ken Dryden Minister of Social Development

Mr. Speaker, the comments that the hon. member made are comments that I did not make. That is all I can say to the hon. member.

Health
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is another dire warning, this time from the Health Council of Canada, that unless this government actually does something to fix the doctor shortage and wait times, we will have a crisis.

It is too late. Recently a 21 year old student died after waiting. Too ill to sit and wait for nine hours to see a doctor, she went home and died.

Last year the health minister said he was making progress. He is confusing process with progress. When can Canadians expect results on accreditation and on the reduction of wait times in this country?

Health
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, perhaps the member forgets that we just provided, six months ago, an additional $41 billion over the next 10 years to the provincial jurisdictions and to the territories so that they can deal with all of the issues. Included in that money is money for training doctors and nurses and other health care providers. The opposition is always asking for tax cuts. That is where money needs to go: it needs to go to health care. We have done that.

Natural Resources
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's South, NL

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance. The government has been talking about unloading its 8.5% share in Hibernia for some time. Speculation is that it might be done soon. The Minister of Natural Resources, however, says that shares are “not on the table” and that “there are no plans to sell the shares and the topic hasn't even been discussed”. Is the minister's statement correct or is he still as confused as he was at the Atlantic accord?