House of Commons Hansard #52 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was industries.

Topics

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Leader of the Opposition.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I had hoped we would get some clear answers before the Prime Minister was hauled off to the inquiry himself.

What Mr. Chrétien does not seem to grasp is that the Liberal sponsorship program is the biggest gift the Quebec separatist movement got in the past decade.

Does this Prime Minister clearly understand that the sponsorship program is a national unity catastrophe?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is simply repeating questions that he has stated in the House time and time again attempting to subvert the Gomery inquiry.

The real issue before the House is his statement the other day, the statement which he confirmed yesterday, which was a blatant attack on the Charter of Rights, the statement that the protection of a minority right was an attack--

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

The Speaker

Order. I cannot hear the Prime Minister. The Prime Minister has the floor. He has finished, but we could not hear his answer. I would ask for some order in the House. Whether members agree or disagree with the answer is irrelevant; we have to be able to hear the answer and the question. The Leader of the Opposition perhaps will try to ask a question now and we will hear the answer.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I am tempted to call the Prime Minister the artless dodger.

We will continue to ask this Prime Minister questions in the House about the sponsorship scandal until we get answers from him.

Last week, the Prime Minister said, and I quote, “I am very proud of what the last government did and I am very proud that I was part of it”.

My question is simple. Is the Prime Minister proud of the sponsorship program and was he part of it?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I will give the Leader of the Opposition the definition of dodging. Dodging is when the member makes attacks on the charter, when the member challenges the charter outside of the House and is afraid to come in here before the Canadian people and make the case. That is dodging and it is cowardice.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is feeling a little thin-skinned today. I hope he is as animated when he testifies before the Gomery commission.

Daily the testimony at the Gomery commission shows direct links between the Liberal Party's political activities and the sponsorship program itself. Liberal Party luminaries, Chrétien, Kinsella and now John Manley, have come out in an attempt to discredit the process that was designed to get to the truth. John Manley is quoted as saying, “The Gomery commission is not a very good idea”.

Will the Prime Minister clearly signal to his Liberal colleagues that they should back off all attempts to discredit or derail the Gomery commission?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Kings—Hants
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, let us talk about unity. In a multicultural bilingual nation like Canada, the role of any leader of this country is to unify Canadians, to bring people together, whether it is English Canadians, French Canadians or minority language groups.

Instead of uniting Canadians, the leader of the Alliance-Conservatives is pitting one minority group against another. Anyone who pits one minority group against another does not deserve to ever lead this great multicultural masterpiece of Canada.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, that Liberal's lips are moving, but I can actually hear Herb Gray. John Manley is saying that the cost of revealing the information at the Gomery commission is too high for the amount of money it is costing.

Clearly, the toll that he is talking about is not on the public treasury, it is on the Liberal Party. Continued comments by prominent Liberals to discredit the Gomery commission are an indication that this testimony is hurting the Liberal Party.

Will the Prime Minister just admit that this mantra about the sponsorship scandal, and the ends justifying the means, is really about the ends which the Liberal Party intended the sponsorship program to do, which was to fill its pockets?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Kings—Hants
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, the real issue here is why the Alliance Conservative Party is trying to divide Canadians instead of trying to unite them. It is shameful for that party to take advantage of Canada's multicultural minorities and to use them as pawns for cheap political purposes.

No wonder the director of the World Sikh Organization is quoted today as saying, “Why would politicians like the Leader of the Opposition use constitutional rights issues to further divide multicultural communities in Canada? It doesn't make sense”.

She is right. It is shameless and it does not make sense for anyone who seeks to lead this country to try to do so by dividing Canadians.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

February 8th, 2005 / 2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, after the car manufacturers, who clearly have the foot on the brake when it comes to producing less polluting vehicles, now the oil industry wants to deduct from their taxes all expenditures in connection with achieving the Kyoto targets.

Instead of sticking taxpayers with the bill, will the Prime Minister apply the polluter pays principle and have the oil companies, which are responsible for 20% of all greenhouse gas emissions in Canada, pay their share?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Avalon
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

R. John Efford Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, we have full intentions of working with all industry stakeholders and automakers right across the country. We have gained tremendous milestones in the last number of years with what we have done in dealing with climate change. We will continue to do so. We will find a balance between protecting the environment and protecting industry.

One should not be done at the expense of the other, but the environment is equally as important in developing a good strong economy in the country.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, plainly stated, this means that it will give in to the great polluters, as the automotive industry predicted yesterday, an opinion shared by the oil industry as well.

Since 1970, the federal government has spent $66 billion for oil, gas and coal, all of which are polluting energies. The people of Quebec have paid their share of that, on top of supporting alone the cost of developing their own hydroelectric resources.

Instead of making Quebeckers pay twice, if he could actually answer once in a while, will the Prime Minister make sure that the great polluters assume themselves the cost of taking the measures necessary to achieve the Kyoto targets?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we will soon have a plan to announce for Kyoto, which will be the 2002 plan, but a significantly improved plan. Rest assured that, on the one hand, everyone, including the oil industry, will do its part and that, on the other hand, the targets will be met. When we Canadians pull and work together, we do achieve great things.