House of Commons Hansard #98 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Aerospace Industry
Oral Question Period

May 13th, 2005 / 12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Paradis Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Industry. Can he tell us what action the government has taken today to ensure the future of the aerospace industry, a key sector of our economy?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway
B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, for several months in this House I have watched the political chicanery and skullduggery from the other side. It is very ironic but not surprising that a question of profound importance to the people of Canada should come from a member on our own side.

Today this government announced yet another initiative to build the aerospace industry in this country. We are partnering with the Government of Quebec and Bombardier to ensure that its new platform C Series aircraft initiative will take place here in Canada with benefits to suppliers all across this country.

Business of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 56.1, I move:

That, notwithstanding any Standing Order or usual practice, the second reading stages of Bill C-43, an act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 23, 2005, and Bill C-48, an act to authorize the Minister of Finance to make certain payments, shall be disposed of as follows:

  1. Any division thereon requested before the expiry of the date for consideration of government orders on Thursday, May 19, 2005, shall be deferred to that time;

  2. At the expiry of the time for consideration of Government Orders on Thursday, May 19, 2005, all questions necessary for the disposal of second reading stages of (1) Bill C-43 and (2) Bill C-48 shall be put and decided forthwith and successively, without further debate, amendment or deferral.

Business of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Does the hon. minister have the unanimous consent of the House to put this motion now?

Business of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Business of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Business of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Under our practice, the minister must move this under motions when we get to motions in the course of routine proceedings unless he has unanimous consent.

I draw his attention to a ruling of the Chair on October 24, 2002: “Our practice is clear,” said the Speaker on that occasion:

Motions pursuant to Standing Order 56.1 should be moved under the rubric “Motions” unless there is unanimous consent to do otherwise.

The hon. member should have that opportunity in a few minutes.

Business of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Ottawa—Vanier
Ontario

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I rise for some clarification. Standing Order 56.1(1)(a) states:

In relation to any routine motion for the presentation of which unanimous consent is required and has been denied, a Minister of the Crown may request during Routine Proceedings that the Speaker propose the said question to the House.

The Standing Orders do not specify the routine proceedings item in question and I was under the impression that we were under routine proceedings. Could the Speaker please clarify this possible contradiction?

Business of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The Standing Orders may say “during Routine Proceedings” and “Motions” is one of the items in routine proceedings when motions are normally proposed.

I have quoted the ruling that was given in 2002 on this point. I do not believe it was a new practice at that time. I believe it was based on previous decisions, but I am unable to pull those out at the moment because I do not have them with me. I did have that one, and that is why I asked for consent. As I have said, the minister will have an opportunity when we get to motions, which should happen in a few minutes.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Liberal

Raymond Simard Parliamentary Secretary to the Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to two petitions.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

John Williams Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 11th report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts concerning Chapter 4, “Management of Federal Drug Benefit Programs”, of the November 2004 Report of the Auditor General of Canada. In accordance with Standing Order 109, your committee requests a government response within 120 days.

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

Inky Mark Dauphin—Swan River, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-390, an act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (increase of benefits).

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to table this bill. As the House knows, the government has stolen billions of dollars from hard working Canadians. Basically, much of it has ended up in a slush fund.

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I remind the hon. member that suggesting that government steals money is not in order. He is introducing a bill. He will want to restrain himself in his choice of words.

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

Inky Mark Dauphin—Swan River, MB

Mr. Speaker, I do retract the word stolen. The government probably misplaced it.

Unfortunately, the EI plan is supposed to be insurance. What ended up happening was the government overtaxed hard-working Canadians.

This bill will rectify that and give more money back to hard-working Canadians.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Heritage Hunting and Fishing Protection Act
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

Inky Mark Dauphin—Swan River, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-391, an act to recognize and protect Canada's hunting and fishing heritage.

Mr. Speaker, this bill should have been introduced in the House probably 20 years ago.

On the issue of recognition, hunting and fishing has been a long tradition of this country for all Canadians, for those who came here before the Europeans. Under the government we will no longer have hunting or fishing if we keep going down the path we are going right now.

It is a great honour and I look forward to passing this bill in the House.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)