House of Commons Hansard #118 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was years.

Topics

An Act to Authorize the Minister of Finance to Make Certain Payments
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

NDP

Ed Broadbent Ottawa Centre, ON

And the Conservatives in Saskatchewan before that.

An Act to Authorize the Minister of Finance to Make Certain Payments
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, my colleague from Ottawa Centre has reminded me of a graphic illustration. Seven years of Grant Devine's Conservative government almost ruined that province. Eight years of Allan Blakeney budgets were all balanced. Eight years of Roy Romanow budgets were all balanced. Now the current premier has actually turned that province with balanced budgets into a have province instead of a have not province. That is a good track record.

I do not say that to be smart or critical of my colleagues in the Conservative Party, but let us be historically accurate when we make these kinds of claims. It is not fair to do it at midnight when I am not here to defend my party.

I am proud today that with 19 members of Parliament, I believe we have made a difference. I compliment my colleagues from the ruling party, the Liberal Party, for listening to our legitimate concerns and the legitimate concerns of Canadians and accommodating through consultation some of those spending measures.

It should be noted as well that there was another inaccuracy that I want to correct. Some people said that the NDP came in and negotiated an end to the tax cuts that were in the original budget. That is not accurate. We negotiated an end to the corporate tax cuts. Small business and medium size business will still get the original tax cuts that were contemplated in the original budget.

We believed that because there had been four successive cuts in a row to the corporate tax rate, it was time to balance things out a little bit and spend a little bit of our taxpayers' dollars on taxpayers. Not all money has to be shovelled dutifully to Bay Street. It is not written or carved in stone anywhere on the threshold of this place. Sometimes we are allowed to spend some of our surplus tax dollars on the needs of individual taxpayers. What is wrong with that concept?

I cannot understand the party that used to call itself the great grassroots party not standing up for the interests of grassroots Canadians who would enjoy a little bit of relief in terms of tuition for their children going to university, and who would thank the House of Commons.

An Act to Authorize the Minister of Finance to Make Certain Payments
Government Orders

11 a.m.

Conservative

Ken Epp Edmonton—Sherwood Park, AB

Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, before we go to question period, I want to make a point to all of my colleagues.

BlackBerries have to be switched off on airplanes because their transmission interferes with the electronics of an airplane. The same thing is true here. If the BlackBerries are active when they are next to the microphones, the microphones pick it up. It is most annoying and it is broadcast right across the country.

I wish members would turn the things to “no transmit” when they are here, just as they do when they are on airplanes.

An Act to Authorize the Minister of Finance to Make Certain Payments
Government Orders

11 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

I thank the member for his electronic expertise. Members can take that advice, as they will, please.

Lung Association
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Lung Association has been helping Ontarians for more than 100 years. The Peterborough branch has worked in our community for many years.

In the early days, the Lung Association successfully fought TB. In recent years it has been at the forefront of the fight against tobacco smoking in public and in private.

The association's “Lungs are for Life” school program directly addresses young people at a time when they are most vulnerable to tobacco addiction and at a time when lifestyles tend to be set.

Although great progress has been made against public smoking, there is still a great deal to do. One in five Canadians still smoke, 18% of young people still smoke and 12,000 people a year die from tobacco use in Ontario alone.

I commend Health Canada for its support of the Lung Association's fine work and I urge that it continue. I thank all those in the Peterborough Lung Association for their fine, dedicated work. I urge members to visit www.yourhealthyhome.ca.

National Defence
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Rob Moore Fundy, NB

Mr. Speaker, in the 1950s and 1960s the Department of National Defence sprayed agent orange, agent purple and other highly toxic chemical herbicides at Base Gagetown in New Brunswick. The health and well-being of many were put at risk because of the use of this poison. Civilian and military personnel, their dependants and the public in general who were living near the base were told there was no danger. It was obvious they were misled.

The Government of Canada has known the consequences of this spraying for many years now and since then has continued to dither, hide evidence and deny any responsibility for its actions. The Minister of Veterans Affairs has suggested in the House that she is eager to help. However, with 20 files on her desk seeking compensation without any resolution, I suggest her definition of eager is somewhat similar to the actions the government displayed on the issue of hepatitis C.

The government was quick to come up with a $4.5 billion ad hoc budget scribbled on the back of a napkin in a hotel room in Toronto to serve its own political agenda, but when it comes to helping ordinary Canadians, it has failed to act.

Science Fair
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this occasion to congratulate a 14 year-old student from my riding, Alexandre Harvey, who recently won the gold medal at the Canada-wide science fair held in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Alexandre attends École secondaire Sainte Marie in New Liskeard. His project, aptly titled “Ça cliques-tu?” measured the effect of the sound of a metronome on students writing mathematics tests or spelling dictation.

By comparing marks, Alexandre was able to determine that students who wrote tests to the sound of a metronome got 25% better marks.

Alexandre's goal was to find a way to help students get better marks, regardless of their work methods.

Alexandre is obviously a young scientist who bears watching in future, judging by these excellent results.

Congratulations, Alexandre, we are very proud of you.

La révolte des pêcheurs
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Bloc

Raynald Blais Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, QC

Mr. Speaker, on May 1 in Rivière-au-Renard, I had the pleasure of attending a dramatic reading of the Maurice Joncas play La révolte des pêcheurs , directed by Francine Guimond.

This play based on historical facts re-enacts the terrible experiences of a group of fishermen in the Rivière-au-Renard area of Gaspé in 1909. They had had enough of being exploited by the Jersey merchants, and rose up in revolt.

The Liberal MP of the day panicked and sent two Canadian navy frigates as scare tactics. Soldiers came ashore at Pointe-à-la-Renommée in the dark of night and searched homes at gunpoint. They tracked people into the woods and arrested a number of them.

William Savage, Édouard Riffoux, Jos Tapp, Urbain Chrétien, Aurèle Élément and many others have gone down in history as the ones who organized this uprising.

I salute the courage and tenacity of these fishermen who stood up to the injustice and exploitation to which they were being subjected. Yet all they wanted was a modicum of freedom and respect.

Child Soldiers
Statements By Members

June 17th, 2005 / 11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Russ Powers Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour of rising in the House today to discuss the efforts of a number of students in my riding to make the world a safer place for children.

Bryan Vanderkruk, Allison Klimeck-Stark and Brad Fonseca of the Hamilton District Christian High School have formed the Making A Difference Political Involvement Group. Working in collaboration with like-minded students from Hamilton's Westmount Secondary School and the St. Thomas Moore Catholic Secondary School, the students are trying to stop the use of child soldiers in armed conflict.

The students would like to see Canada play a leading role in bringing attention to this horrible tragedy that affects an estimated 300,000 children worldwide. I ask my colleagues to join me in saluting the efforts of these students to see that the practice of using child soldiers will not be tolerated.

Seniors
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Carleton—Lanark, ON

Mr. Speaker, today there are at least four million Canadians over the age of 65 and the number continues to grow. In my riding of Carleton—Mississippi Mills, about 4,000 residents are seniors.

Those over the age of 65 are becoming a dominant segment of our society. Currently one in eight in our population is a senior. As the baby boomers become seniors, those over 65 will become one in four in our population. I support strong and focused policies for seniors in the areas of health care, tax relief and benefits to help improve the quality of life for seniors.

Every year in June, Seniors Month is celebrated across Ontario. Seniors Month is an excellent opportunity to pay tribute to all seniors. They are the ones who built our society and it is only fitting that their contributions to our way of life be acknowledged.

I extend my best wishes for health and happiness to all senior citizens in Carleton—Mississippi Mills.

U.S. Open Golf Tournament
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Lloyd St. Amand Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise to congratulate David Hearn, a 25-year-old resident of Brantford, Ontario. David is an exceptionally skilled golfer and this week he is competing for the first time in arguably the most prestigious golf tournament in the world, the U.S. Open being held at Pinehurst, North Carolina.

After a very successful career as a junior golfer, David attended the University of Wyoming on a scholarship and continued to achieve at a very high level.

Indeed, David has been tremendously successful at all levels, including the time he spent on the Canadian Tour, the Nationwide Tour and now as a member of the PGA Tour. It is not an exaggeration to say that the PGA Tour consists of the world's finest golfers and David Hearn certainly deserves to be ranked in that category.

Most important, David is a true gentleman, both on and off the golf course. He is a credit to his parents, to his community and to our country. He is a rising star in the PGA Tour and his name will be recognized by all golf fans in the very near future.

I congratulate David for all he has accomplished.

Satellite Radio
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Maka Kotto Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the CRTC gave the green light to satellite radio, by granting its first two licences. The decision will perhaps appear in the coming years as one of the most important and reckless ever taken by the CRTC.

The Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage noted a good two years ago that the Canadian government was inadequately protecting Canada and Quebec's cultural sovereignty and now the CRTC is doing the same thing by imposing very few restrictions.

The Minister of Canadian Heritage has to wake up. Since the Broadcasting Act will have to be amended in order to put the decision into effect, why not take the opportunity to implement the recommendations of the standing committee to strengthen cultural sovereignty?

Although we remain certain that sovereignty for Quebec is the best way to protect Quebec culture and to foster its development, we can assure the minister that we will support any initiative in this regard.

Albert and Jeannette Lord
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, June 18, I will be attending celebrations marking the 70th wedding anniversary of Jeannette and Albert Lord. They will be celebrating 70 wonderful years together.

It is not every day that a couple celebrates such an event and such an anniversary. This is why I want to express my own congratulations and those of the people of Madawaska—Restigouche to Mr. and Mrs. Lord.

They are a remarkable couple, who invested time and energy in their family. They had 11 children, who produced 25 grandchildren, 36 great-grandchildren and 4 great-great-grandchildren.

In closing, I reiterate my congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Lord on their 70th wedding anniversary. I wish them many more wonderful years together.

Health Care
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Bev Oda Clarington—Scugog—Uxbridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, in my riding of Durham, Lakeridge Health is a multi-site organization with four hospitals facing critical challenges that began when its funding no longer met its needs as a consequence of the government's $25 billion cut in health care spending.

Programs delivered at the smaller rural hospital in Port Perry to serve Scugog Township are now under threat.

The government has promised a health care fix for a generation. The government seems to think that wait times is the only crisis facing our health care system. In the meantime, the special needs of multi-site and rural hospitals such as Port Perry are being challenged.

It is critical to meet this special need and not forget rural Canada and the health care funding crisis it faces.

I ask the government to address this funding issue with recognition that we may lose the most basic of health care services in our rural small towns and communities.

NATO Military Committee
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, this week General Ray Henault assumed his duties as chairman of the NATO Military Committee, becoming NATO's highest ranking military officer. This is only the second time a Canadian has been selected for this position.

General Henault will bring the same attributes of professionalism, commitment and dedication to the chairman's position that he so clearly demonstrated in his three years as chief of the Canadian Forces. Indeed, his qualities of honour, dignity and courage are representative throughout the members of our armed forces.

His election clearly demonstrates Canada's commitment to and leadership in the world's premier security organization and places a Canadian at the most senior level of the alliance's strategic leadership.

In his role, he will chair the senior military committee, offer his advice to the secretary general and will, with NATO strategic commanders and representatives of other NATO nations, conduct operations and shape the alliance of the future.

General Henault's service will bring a Canadian's perspective to NATO transformation. The whole House wishes him well, and Godspeed.