House of Commons Hansard #119 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Child Care
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Ken Dryden Minister of Social Development

Mr. Speaker, those of us on this side of the House very much welcome the comments that are being made from that side of the House.

The difference, however, is that we have not heard anything more than a suggestion that something will be forthcoming. However, nothing has been forthcoming and therefore it is not possible to comment on what is being suggested.

What we know is that this government has committed $5 billion over five years, a 48% commitment, which is an increase on what is currently being spent.

Child Care
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Edmonton—Spruce Grove, AB

Mr. Speaker, last week the Montreal Gazette said that a Liberal one size fits all day care plan was unfair and discriminated against shift workers, people who live in rural areas and stay at home parents.

A Margaret Wente article in Reader's Digest said that the Liberal day care program would not help poor children. We have been arguing this for months. Instead of putting the money into a program that only benefits some, we would give money to every Canadian child.

When will the Prime Minister stop supporting a program that discriminates against so many families?

Child Care
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Ken Dryden Minister of Social Development

Mr. Speaker, I might remind the hon. member, in terms of the comments she made about rural and remote child care, that the province of Saskatchewan by the third year will have an increase of 95% on what it is that is currently available for child care within the province from governments; the province of Manitoba, 48%; Ontario a 69% increase; the province of New Brunswick, 132%; Nova Scotia, 90%, the province of Newfoundland, 130%

Broadcasting
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, radio in the 21st century is satellite radio. On June 16, the CRTC granted three subscription radio licences without requiring sufficient French content. The Quebec culture minister as well as the record industry have denounced this decision, describing it as a threat to Quebec culture.

Does this government intend to respond to the minister and ADISQ, who are calling for it to consult with stakeholders in order to get their opinion on how much French content would be appropriate on subscription radio?

Broadcasting
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber
Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla Minister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, these decisions will have a significant impact on the broadcasting system. These decisions can also be appealed. We know that some groups intend to do so. Accordingly, I reserve comment until later on.

Broadcasting
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, while the Broadcasting Act requires Canadian and French content proportionate to demographics, the CRTC has made a decision that disregards the very intent of the law. Not only is 10% Canadian content far from enough, but 2.5% French content is totally unacceptable.

My question is for the minister. Since she is an advocate for cultural diversity, could she not take leadership and express her opinion in order to help the groups feel more confident about their appeal?

Broadcasting
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber
Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla Minister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, we cannot be both judge and jury. We know that some groups are going to appeal the decision. Accordingly, we are reserving judgment. In the meantime, we will consider the consequences of the ruling and hear the appeal if there is one.

Broadcasting
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Maka Kotto Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, enough sophistry. The decisions made today will define the way subscription radio is regulated for decades to come. So it is fundamental and vital that the government take the time needed to make the right decision.

Will the Minister of Canadian Heritage, in all transparency, grant the request of Quebec's culture minister, Lyne Beauchamp? She wants the federal government to do whatever it takes to better protect French content on subscription radio.

Broadcasting
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber
Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla Minister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, here is how it works. Various groups have said they intend to appeal the decision. They have 45 days in which to do so, and we have 45 days in which to respond. As usual, we will act in accordance with our responsibilities in this matter.

Broadcasting
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Maka Kotto Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, this is a golden opportunity in broadcasting, an outstanding opportunity to protect cultural diversity.

Will the minister admit that the 2.5% share for French language satellite radio is clearly insufficient? Will she do everything in her power to correct this situation?

Broadcasting
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber
Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla Minister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, since I have been given an opportunity to say something about cultural diversity, I am pleased to point out that 128 countries have approved the preliminary text on cultural diversity and that, last week, 60 countries maintained their support for this convention, which should be signed in October 2005.

With regard to the CRTC decision, I will accept my responsibilities. The parties have 45 days to appeal, and we have 45 days in which to respond.

Civil Marriage Act
Oral Question Period

June 20th, 2005 / 2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Prime Minister.

We now have a majority of MPs, a majority of citizens and most courts in Canada that support equality and yet it is still not here. In fact, there does not even appear to be an end in sight to this debate.

This morning the Prime Minister indicated that he felt that ensuring that the charter of human rights was put in place, enforced and strengthened was his responsibility.

After so many years of waiting for equality, how can we know that the Prime Minister takes it seriously? What are his specific steps to bring this new law into place?

Civil Marriage Act
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we are strong and unwavering in our commitment to see Bill C-38 pass but we want to ensure that all members have the opportunity to debate it. I must say that if the opposition would stop its filibustering and obstructionism, the fact is that we could see it passed.

Civil Marriage Act
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, what does it take for the Prime Minister to finally lead on the issue? He waited for the courts. He has the courts. We have two opposition parties willing to help bring this bill through. A majority of his own caucus supports the bill. What we need is the Prime Minister to show some leadership.

Will he propose the steps necessary in this House so that this law can become law this spring and we will wait no longer?

Civil Marriage Act
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, it was the Prime Minister and this government that brought this law to the House. It is this government that continues to fight to ensure equality of rights and protection of religious freedoms. It was this government and the justice minister that provided amendments in committee to provide greater certainty with respect to religious freedoms.

Finally, I would say to the hon. member that every necessary step to ensure passage of this legislation is taking place.