House of Commons Hansard #125 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was oil.

Topics

Question No. 162
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

NDP

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

With regards to Canada's annual reporting on and contribution to the Bretton Woods institutions: ( a ) how has Canada's participation in the institutions met Canada's established foreign policy goals and objectives, with reference to specific targets and measurable results; ( b ) what are the results-based indicators used by the government to measure the efficacy of the Bretton Woods institutions and why is their use not reflected in the annual report to Parliament; ( c ) how did Canada position itself on contentious issues under debate during the last year at the Bretton Woods institutions, particularly the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) independent Evaluation Office's Argentinian crisis evaluation, the IMF and the World Bank's evaluation departments separate evaluations on Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers, the Extractive Industries Review and Bretton Woods governance issues as related to the “voice and vote” debate; ( d ) how would the government characterize and compare the year-to-year changes in policies and priorities taken by Canada at these institutions; ( e ) what is the government's analysis of the financial performance of these institutions; ( f ) what role do Canada's contributions and participation in these institutions play within Canada's Official Development Assistance strategy; ( g ) what are the amounts contributed to IMF special funds or World Bank-administered trust funds particularly the African Regional Technical Assistance Center (AFRITAC) and the Caribbean Regional Technical Assistance Centre (CARTAC), the IMF's Technical Subaccount for Iraq, the World Bank's Global Environment Facility, the Global Funds for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the African Capacity Building Initiative, the Consultant Trust Fund, Education in Africa and the World Bank Institute and Integrated Framework for Trade Related Technical Assistance; ( h ) what is the strategic economic benefit of Canada's participation in the Bretton Woods institutions, beyond private sector procurement opportunities; ( i ) what are the details of the 2004 US $71 million in procurement opportunities to Canadian companies and individuals and how was this information acquired; ( j ) is this total significantly down from 2003 and if so, why; ( k ) what is the comparative financial information with variances explained for each of the last five years with regard to Canadian procurement, environmentally sustainable development, health, water and education; ( l ) what do these trends indicate about the priorities of the Bretton Woods institutions and their consistency with Canadian foreign and development policy; and ( m ) could the government clarify how the objectives of finance and development are reconciled between federal departments and between donor and recipient members of Canada's constituency at the World Bank and International Monetary Fund?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 165
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Conservative

Randy White Abbotsford, BC

With regard to Correctional Services Canada during the fiscal years 2002-2003, 2003-2004 and 2004-2005: ( a ) what was the total amount of salary bonuses paid to prison wardens in all regions; ( b ) what was the total cost in providing legal aid to inmates in each region; and ( c ) in how many instances was said legal aid utilized?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 166
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Conservative

Bill Casey North Nova, NS

With regard to the December 22, 2000 announcement by the Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada that a new federal multi-tenant government building, to replace the Dominion Building, would be constructed in Charlottetown and ready for occupancy by fall 2005: ( a ) how much did Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) pay for the lands and building where this proposed building will be constructed; ( b ) what was the name of the company or individual who sold the lands and building to the government; ( c ) what was the original cost for the construction of this new government building, including those estimates which were based on plans that included a parking garage, and the subsequent plan with no parking garage; ( d ) what was the market value of said lands at the time of purchase; ( e ) when the government prepared the land for construction of this new building, what procedures were undertaken to clean and/or remediate the soils found on-site; ( f ) in regards to question (e) were any of the soils found to be contaminated in any way; ( g ) in regards to question (f) if the soils were found to be contaminated in any way, were any of the soils removed or taken off-site for burial, storage or remediation; ( h ) what are the final locations for any contaminated soils taken from this construction site; ( i ) if no removal occurred, were the soils left on-site; ( j ) what reasons or explanations have officials from PWGSC given to the municipal council of Charlottetown in regards to the revision of construction plans not to include a parking garage; ( k ) in regards to question (j), once the new building is complete and ready to accept tenants what is the plan to accommodate those employees who will be driving to work and will need parking; ( l ) what is the new timetable for construction for the new building, based on the difficulties experienced by PWGSC in the tendering and re-tendering process; ( m ) what is the estimate of PWGSC on how many construction workers are to be employed at this construction site and for how long; ( n ) in regards to the tendering and re-tendering processes, what are the names of the companies that submitted a bid for this project; ( o ) in regards to question (n), what were the bid amounts submitted, by company, for this project; ( p ) has the Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada ever held meetings with the Members of Parliament from Prince Edward Island in regards to the construction of this new government building; and ( q ) in regards to question (p) if meetings were held, what concerns were raised by the Liberal Members of Parliament in regards to this construction project?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 168
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

With regards to the Agent Orange, which Canadian military sites were used for Agent Orange experimentation after 1945, including the exact locations by individual base where testing occurred

(Return tabled)

Question No. 171
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Were there Agent Purple experimentations conducted during the 1960's at CFB Gagetown and, if so, where are the field exercise areas that were used for these experimentations located at CFB Gagetown?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 172
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

NDP

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

With regard to corporate taxation: ( a ) what is the estimate by Revenue Canada of the amount of international transactions that were not reported by Canadian corporations for each year since 1991; ( b ) has the government given any loans or tax exempt status to any of the following companies over the last 25 years: General Motors, Bombardier, Noranda, Canadian Pacific, Domtar, Chrysler Canada, Baie-Comeau Co., Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting, Bank of Montreal and Coopers and Lybrand Consulting Group; ( c ) if any loans or tax exempt status has been given to these companies how much money is outstanding; ( d ) what is the cap on the amount of family trust assets that can be transferred out of the country by Canadians; ( e ) what is the level of family trust assets that can be transferred out of the country by an individual without taxation; ( f ) what is the proportion of taxes collected by the government that comes from individuals, compared to the amount raised by corporate taxes; ( g ) how has this proportion changed over the past two decades; ( h ) if there has been a shift in the proportion collected from corporate tax vs. personal tax, has this been a result of any government policy; and ( i ) how does the government expect the proportion of taxation coming from corporate tax vs. personal tax to change over the next 10 years?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 172
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all remaining questions be allowed to stand.

Question No. 172
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?

Question No. 172
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Question No. 172
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

The Speaker

The Chair has some notifications of applications for emergency debate. I will hear those now. First is the hon. member for Abbotsford.

Request for Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

September 26th, 2005 / 3:30 p.m.

Conservative

Randy White Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, a matter of significant national interest has arisen that requires immediate debate in the House and, according to Standing Order 52, I so ask. The issue is that of extreme fluctuations and increases in and the unpredictability of gas prices.

The recent gas increases have seen significant profit at the pumps and in federal government coffers through taxation. Canadians are rightly alarmed that this affects the cost of goods purchased and transportation costs of all types and there is substantial worry about rising costs of home heating this winter.

The debate is necessary not just to discuss rising costs but to provide the House and Canadians with basic information on the following issues: who is profiting from such increases and by how much; forecasts and consumer protection related to increases; the proper role and action from the House of Commons; the ramifications of cutting federal tax on fuels; and the impact on various businesses and industries.

This matter is on the agenda of all Canadians, who are for the most part bewildered about the fluctuating gas prices.

I sincerely ask you, Mr. Speaker, to put this on the agenda of the House of Commons so that Canadians will believe that we too have an interest in dealing with this matter, and now.

Request for Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Rivière-Du-Loup—Montmagny, QC

Mr. Speaker, we agree that it is indeed important to hold an emergency debate on this issue as soon as possible this evening.

During the parliamentary recess, we experienced a sudden spike in fuel prices and noticed that astronomical profits were made, which were not and could not be explained.

Last Thursday, the Standing Committee on Industry, Natural Resources, Science and Technology dedicated a meeting to this issue, and agreed to summon the five responsible ministers to attend. We are facing a reality today in which prices are consistently 25% higher than they were at the beginning of the year. It is imperative that the federal government put an action plan in place.

That is why we are hoping that the members of this House will be making short-, medium- and long-term proposals to prompt the government to act and finally adopt a policy to counter these disproportionate hikes in fuel prices.

The fact is that these hikes are jeopardizing economic growth. Many people have made comments to that effect, including some of our fellow citizens, consumers, economic stakeholders and both small and large business owners. The transportation industry as a whole was in agreement.

It is important that the House of Commons debate this issue as soon as possible, to contribute to the government's consideration of the issue so that it can come up with a real action plan. This is why I feel my request is justified.

Request for Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

3:35 p.m.

The Speaker

The Chair has considered this matter, and while I am sure the matter is of some interest, whether it is a matter that meets the exigencies of the Standing Order at this time the Chair has some doubts. Accordingly, I am inclined to disallow the application at this time.

Request for Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

3:35 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Rivière-Du-Loup—Montmagny, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order.

My colleague, the leader of the Bloc Québécois, has informed his counterparts that should you find that the request for emergency debate that I submitted to you does not meet the criteria of the Standing Order, he would seek unanimous consent to hold a debate on the important issue of the price of gasoline.

Thus, I am seeking unanimous consent to pass the following motion:

That an emergency debate on gas prices be held this evening in accordance with the provisions of Standing Order 52 and that during this debate no quorum calls, dilatory motions or requests for unanimous consent shall be received by the Speaker.

Request for Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

3:35 p.m.

The Speaker

Does the hon. member for Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?