House of Commons Hansard #128 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was bankruptcy.

Topics

Search and Rescue
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Don Bell North Vancouver, BC

Mr. Speaker, on September 17 it was my honour to attend the 40th anniversary celebration of North Shore Rescue, a volunteer and community based search and rescue team. It has approximately 40 members from all walks of life who share a common interest in providing an important life saving service to the public, year round, 24 hours a day.

The team has served our community during the last 40 years by successfully completing 1,600 search and rescue tasks involving over 2,000 individuals who are frequently found in dangerous conditions. North Shore Rescue volunteer members have contributed well over 100,000 rescue hours during the past 40 years and in doing so have become recognized for their high levels of expertise and dedication throughout B.C. and beyond. To date, in 2005, they have responded to over 82 calls, far greater than in previous years.

I would like to thank these volunteers for their caring and dedication to the community and thank their families who are without them while they are away helping others in need. In the past year we have all been witness to the necessity of emergency preparedness and we are comforted knowing that the men and women of North Shore Rescue give their time and energy to remain prepared.

Adéodat Saint-Pierre
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Louise Thibault Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, Adéodat Saint-Pierre is a man of the land. Protecting it, living on it, and making sure it flourishes have long been his objectives.

First regional and then national president of the Fédération des producteurs de bois du Québec, president of the Coalition urgence rurale du Bas-Saint-Laurent, a driving force behind Maisons familiales rurales au Québec, a former farmer and forester honoured with the Hommage bénévolat-Québec award in 2001, Mr. Saint-Pierre is known for his remarkable commitment and contribution to the environment.

It is truly an honour for me to acknowledge his ardour, determination, audacity even, and his vision for sustainable use of the land.

Next Saturday, l'Université du Québec in Rimouski will award him its prestigious Médaille institutionnelle in recognition of his exceptional contribution to the development of his community. I fully support their choice. I want to thank Adéodat Saint-Pierre and congratulate him on all his accomplishments.

Animal Rights
Statements By Members

September 29th, 2005 / 2 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, over the course of the summer I was truly taken by the number of constituents, and indeed Canadians, who spoke up on the issue of animal cruelty and the lack of strength in the current legislation.

The last time these laws were changed was in 1956 and those were only minor amendments from the changes made in 1892. In fact, animals are still in our property section and are really afforded no protection. As various abuses occur, the reality is that nothing is being done.

The House has been dealing with an animal cruelty bill since 1999. We are now on our seventh incarnation of the bill. It is imperative that we take action. Bill C-50 is hopefully going to be presented to the House soon. It needs to be passed by all members of the House with great expediency. It is essentially the same bill that was passed previously. The bill that is currently before the Senate is woefully inadequate. It does not protect animals. It keeps them in the property section.

It is important to say this because there are a lot of people in the hunting community who have received false information. They have nothing to be worried about—

Animal Rights
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Yorkton—Melville.

Gasoline Prices
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, two and a half years ago I informed Parliament that the most common complaint I was hearing from farmers in my riding was that they were fed up with the high price of fuel. Imagine what they are seeing today.

Liberals are telling Canadians that they will not lower taxes because high taxes are helping municipalities and the provinces. This is false. Funding for infrastructure in our communities will only amount to 5¢ a litre and not until 2010. This is a far cry from the 40¢ a litre every Canadian is paying in gasoline taxes today.

Many grain producers at this time of year are paying at least $400 a day for fuel. That is well over $100 a day in taxes alone. In 1969 gas was about 6¢ a litre and farmers were getting about $1.40 a bushel for their wheat. Today gas prices are 12 times higher, yet wheat prices are barely twice as much. It is obvious that something has to change.

Is it not sad that the finance minister, who lives in Saskatchewan, will not lower gas taxes?

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I am compelled to rise today to speak out on the ongoing labour dispute between CBC and the Canadian Media Guild. I cannot stress enough the importance of restoring regular CBC programming to our airwaves as soon as possible. I applaud the hard work of the Minister of Labour and Housing to facilitate the negotiations.

The role that CBC fulfills is quite singular and the work stoppage is being felt across the country. The lockout has left a void in Canadian radio and television. Canadians, both in my constituency of Winnipeg South Centre and elsewhere, have made it quite clear that they want to see an end to this lockout immediately. Workers in my community ask for fairness and respect as employees.

I ask the management of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to allow the workers to do their work while the negotiations continue. End this lockout now, for the truth is that all Canadians are being locked out.

Noël Lacas
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, it was with sadness that we learned of the passing of Noël Lacas last week.

I want to acknowledge his exceptional contributions to the union movement and to the development of the Lanaudière region for over 50 years.

In 1952, the Conseil central des syndicats nationaux de Joliette hired him as a union advisor. It was in this role that he became instrumental in forming new unions and in negotiating for the public sector and for prison guards in Quebec.

Since his retirement in 1984, Noël Lacas had been heavily involved in sovereignist activities.

With his passing, the Lanaudière region and Quebec as a whole have lost a great unionist and staunch defender of Quebec.

A historian as well, he brought us a well-researched history of the Conseil central de Joliette, now the Conseil central de Lanaudière

His funeral was held on September 22 at the Joliette Cathedral. The Bloc Québécois offers its condolences to his family and loved ones.

Federal Gas Tax
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

David Smith Pontiac, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to share with my colleagues my enthusiasm in light of the historic agreement signed between the Government of Quebec and the federal government to transfer a portion of the federal gas tax.

I am especially pleased because the 43 municipalities in my riding will benefit from new funding. This will allow small municipalities to plan and get work done, instead of waiting for funding.

During the last election campaign, we talked about the need for a new deal for cities and communities: promise made, promise kept. So, thanks to our government, Canadian municipalities will receive $5 billion over the next five years.

This is a government that keeps its promises, a responsible government, our government.

Bruce--Grey--Owen Sound
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Larry Miller Grey—Bruce—Owen Sound, ON

Mr. Speaker, this month across Ontario there are dozens of agricultural fairs and community festivals, and my riding of Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound is no exception. I have attended many of these events, some of which have celebrated their 150th anniversary.

This weekend I will participate in the Meaford scarecrow invasion and family festival. This annual event is celebrating its ninth year, and from mid-September to mid-October attracts thousands of people eager to see the creations which pop up throughout the municipality thanks to hundreds of volunteers, businesses, schools and individuals. I would like to congratulate everyone for making these community events so successful.

I would also like to congratulate the city of Owen Sound for being selected the winner of the 2005 national edition of the communities in bloom. The city was competing with such places as Brandon, Brockville, Grand Prairie and Charlottetown, and was recognized for excelling in all criteria, including landscaping, environmental awareness and community involvement. Congratulations to Owen Sound.

Child Care
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Gary Carr Halton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to applaud the government for its commitment to Canadian families, and especially the families of Halton.

As a result of the early learning and child care agreement signed with Ontario, Halton will receive 500 new spaces over the next three years. The child care spaces will primarily be located in or near schools so that junior and senior kindergarten students can benefit from a seamless full day of learning and child care.

Regional chair, Joyce Salvoline, said, “The investment made by the provincial and federal governments recognizes the importance of providing the tools for early learning to support the development of our children”.

I am proud that my riding of Halton is able to benefit from this initiative. We are providing families with the resources they need to ensure that their children, our future, get the best possible start in life. I am very proud that Halton families have a government that they can rely on and trust.

Gasoline Prices
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, a study just released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives makes it clear that oil companies have raised gasoline prices away above what can be justified by the current price of crude oil. The study shows that Canadians should be paying several cents a litre less in the current circumstances, instead of being gouged at the pumps as is now the case.

The willingness of oil companies to profiteer from any and all situations would probably also apply to any tax relief on gas. They would just take up the slack and put it into their own pockets. That is why we would be better to have, as the NDP recommends, an energy pricing commission that would regulate the decisions of those who actually raise the prices in the first place.

Focusing on gas taxes is the approach of those who do not want to challenge the power of the multinational oil companies or those who do not want Canadians to be reminded of the fact that NAFTA curtails our ability to sell Canadians their own energy at a lower domestic price.

At the moment Canadians are paying the price of having a Liberal government and a Tory opposition that are both unwilling to tackle the real culprits.

Age of Consent
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Nina Grewal Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

Mr. Speaker, over 80% of Canadians want Parliament to raise the age of consent so children are protected from sexual predators. In most democracies around the world, the age of consent stands at 16 years but in Canada it is 14.

Liberal social policy is making Canada a hot spot for Internet predators. Sexual predators are flocking to Canada to take advantage of our vulnerable youth. Kids in grade 8 or 9 are not mature enough to drink, drive, smoke or watch certain movies, but the government believes 14 year olds can make adult decisions when it comes to sex.

This is not about puppy love, but about perverts preying on our children. We need to act now before more innocent lives are ruined.

Shame on the Liberals and shame on the minister for not taking the protection of our children seriously. A Conservative government would do the right thing. We stand up for Canadian children.

Canada Post
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, in August, Canada Post announced that it would be transferring mail sorting services from Quebec City to Montreal, eliminating 500 full-time and part-time jobs in the region, with all the economic repercussions that this entails.

At a press conference this morning, a number of political and socio-economic stakeholders reiterated their support for a broad coalition that opposes this decision by Canada Post. Given the support of this broad coalition and the public, the Bloc Québécois will continue to demand a moratorium on this closure until the crown corporation tables a comprehensive restructuring plan.

The Minister of Transport, who is responsible for the regions of Quebec, downplayed this issue during his stopover in Quebec City, and the minister responsible for Canada Post has washed his hands of this matter by making his officials deal with it, despite the fact that the government is bound to act to save the sorting plant and the jobs at that plant.

Premier of Nova Scotia
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise to pay tribute to the great Nova Scotia Premier, John Hamm, who announced his retirement today.

A man of sterling reputation, Premier Hamm has led his province with distinction for six years and the people of Nova Scotia will enjoy the fruits of his labour for generations to come. Through his leadership the finances of the province of Nova Scotia are in the best shape they have been in decades. Under his watch reinvestments were made in health, education and infrastructure.

Among his many accomplishments, his greatest may be his securing of an offshore royalty deal that will ensure a prosperous and bright economic future for the people of Nova Scotia.

The Leader of the Opposition, the Conservative caucus and myself took great pride in working with Premier Hamm and his government.

Perhaps Gentleman John Hamm's greatest legacy will be the integrity and decency he brought to public life and the esteem he brought to the office of the Premier. He accomplished much with humble perseverance, humour and grace. At a time when cynicism about public life is high, John Hamm is leaving office with an ever increasing respect and affection of the people he served.

To John and his wife Genesta and their entire family, we extend our heartfelt thanks and best wishes.

Carmen Provenzano
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Brent St. Denis Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing, ON

Mr. Speaker, this past July my friend and our former colleague, Carmen Provenzano, suddenly passed away. He was Sault Ste. Marie's federal member of Parliament from 1997 until 2004. He was a loving husband to Ada, a caring father to their children, a devoted member of the community, a hard-working MP and a great friend. His funeral mass was a wonderful testimony to his life.

Carmen will be missed but in many ways he will be remembered, including through the recent establishment of the Carmen Provenzano Memorial Cup to be given to the Sault Ste. Marie or Blind River team that does best in each of the Northern Ontario Junior Hockey League seasons.

Whether it was fighting to save the Sault's Algoma Steel Plant, working to ensure FedNor funding northern Ontario as our caucus chair, fighting effectively behind the scenes to advance community projects or doing the countless smaller but important things he did for his constituents, he will be fondly remembered as a man who loved his family, his friends, his community and Canada.

May my friend rest well and enjoy his place in paradise.