House of Commons Hansard #72 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-22.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Ontario had a clean, clear, specific deal: $540 million from the federal government to shut coal-fired electricity production down.

The minister knows that the $540 million had nothing to do with transfers, equalization, health care, education or any other support from the federal government to the Ontario government. This is something that will really deliver clean air for Ontario.

When will the minister deliver the money? Where is Ontario's money?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I know the premier of Ontario is grumpy about some things but the one thing he should not be grumpy about is the funding of the Canada-Ontario agreement which is fully funded in budget 2006. Not only that, but we recently signed an agreement on the collection of corporate taxes that will save businesses in Ontario $100 million a year.

Not only that, but the Canada-Ontario agreement, thanks to the Prime Minister, was extended for an additional year. It is now six years fully funded.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Lemay Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, aboriginal housing is so dilapidated and in such disrepair that in a number of areas you would think you were in the third world.

Given that aboriginal housing is a federal responsibility, the lack of interest of the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development in the inhumane living conditions of aboriginal peoples is scandalous.

With surpluses accumulating, how could the government show up empty-handed at the Mashteuiatsh forum and have nothing better to say than, and I quote the member for Lévis—Bellechasse, “everything is already in the works”.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development was very proud to be a co-sponsor of the socio-economic forum at Mashteuiatsh. He took part in a meaningful way and was very proud to be a part of the deliberations there.

In relation to housing, the minister has moved forward with one of the largest announcements we have seen in many years: $300 million for northern housing and $300 million for off reserve housing.

We are taking action and we are very proud of that.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Lemay Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, one of the major issues discussed at this forum was the dire shortage of housing on reserves, an area of federal jurisdiction.

How is it that the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development , who has responsibility for aboriginal peoples, was not in attendance at the forum on the very day that the housing shortage on reserves was debated in a workshop?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Indian Affairs was very proud to be a co-sponsor of this event. Meaningful things came from this event, including deliberations on housing.

Our government has moved forward with important funding announcements: $300 million for northern housing, $300 million for off reserve housing, as well as a $450 million package, which is one of the largest investments we have seen in the last 10 years.

The Environment
Oral Questions

October 30th, 2006 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Jean Lapierre Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, after tearing up Kyoto, this government is now rejecting the Stern report, which proposes an emergency plan to prevent the anticipated disasters due to global warming.

Despite another red alert, why is the government continuing to stick its head in the sand and refusing to do anything before 2050? That will be much too late.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the report stresses that there has been a lack of progress made worldwide on this issue. In fact, it is something our government has said clearly and repeatedly from the beginning that there has been a lack of progress in Canada under the previous government, particularly in relation to the Kyoto protocol.

The report also says that, “strong deliberate policy decisions need to be made to motivate change”.

What we need are regulations. We need to regulate industry to cut its pollution and its greenhouse gases, which is exactly what the government is doing.

Skilled Trades
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Goldring Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker, as we know all too well, in economically heated market areas across Canada there is a great need for skilled tradespeople.

On this National Skilled Trades Day, could the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development tell the House what initiatives Canada's new government has taken to encourage more Canadians to enter into apprenticeships and the skilled trades?

Skilled Trades
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, we recognized more and more that Canada's growth would be dependent upon people entering the skilled trades, from welders and carpenters to hairstylists and chefs, which is why, within the first 100 days of taking office, Canada's new government introduced three bold new initiatives that will benefit over 800,000 apprentices and tradespeople.

The apprenticeship incentive grant, the apprenticeship job creation tax credit and the tradespeople's tool tax deduction are just three examples of how Canada's new government is taking action.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, we are back to the British government report which says that unchecked global warming will devastate the world economy on the scale of the Great Depression. The report says that the world could lose up to 20% of GDP if greenhouse gases continue to rise.

Now that the first comprehensive economic based report on climate change has been completed, does this do what those countless other scientific studies could not, which is to force the environment minister to take climate change seriously as an environmental and as an economic issue?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, what motivated us to take serious action was the call from Canadians. They were worried about smog days and about the increase in greenhouse gases by up to 35% under the former government, which is why we have already moved to regulate every industry sector across the country for both greenhouse gases and air pollution.

That is the kind of deliberate policy choice that will motivate change and the kinds of policy decisions that this report calls for.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, the minister's climate change plan just does not cut it. It needs a major overhaul and the NDP is willing to help.

The Stern report says that climate change is the greatest market failure the world has ever seen. British Prime Minister Tony Blair says that unless we act now, not some time in the distant future but now, these consequences will be irreversible.

The U.K. Prime Minister gets it. The NDP gets it. It is just the environment minister who does not. Will the Minister of Finance look past the oil patch and toward the future? Will he make a real plan for climate change?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I look forward to working with all members of this House on our new legislation that would regulate both greenhouse gases and pollution. It is what Canadians want and what Canadians deserve. If the NDP members have good ideas, I look forward to hearing from them.

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Michael Savage Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, since January, politics is rampant in ACOA, in the timing of announcements, the minister's arrogant attitude toward criticism and in the appointment to key public service positions. The former chief of staff to former premier Lord in New Brunswick has been appointed the vice-president of ACOA. Now we hear a political operative from Premier Binn's office will be appointed to a similar position in P.E.I.

Are Atlantic Canadians really expected to believe that the only qualified people to lead ACOA reside in the offices of tired Conservative premiers? Will the Prime Minister assure this House that he will not parachute any more partisans into a comfortable landing at ACOA?