House of Commons Hansard #5 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was parents.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

April 7th, 2006 / 11:10 a.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, protesters are entering the second month of a land reclamation near the town of Caledonia just outside the Six Nations reserve.

Protesters say the Haldimand Tract land was unlawfully sold in the past and that the federal government is negligent in its responsibilities to the reserve and its members.

This blockade is only one example of unanswered land claims frustrating first nations. The Six Nations alone have 28 land claims it is waiting for the government to settle.

The previous government and now this one have the attitude that it is cheaper to negotiate than to settle land claims or treaties. Aboriginal peoples of Canada feel differently. The cost to them in uncertainty and lost opportunity is almost immeasurable.

Yesterday the minister's office told the press that the blockade was provincial jurisdiction, not federal. We do not need finger pointing. We need somebody to take some leadership.

When will this government look at the big picture and see that coming to the table to negotiate land claims and treaties is its duty? It must act now in good faith to bring these issues to a conclusion.

World Health Day
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, today is World Health Day. Every day, 40,000 children perish and 1,500 women die in childbirth. In Africa, one child in six dies before turning five years old.

The number of people who will die of AIDS will be in excess of 200 million. Two million people die every year from malaria and an equivalent number die from tuberculosis. This is shocking, considering that most of these deaths are preventable, manageable or treatable.

Here at home the number of people with dementia and other chronic diseases is escalating, and childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions.

None of these challenges were mentioned in the Speech from the Throne.

Simple measures and simple interventions properly implemented and coordinated with a long term view to capacity building would save millions of lives.

The new government should recognize that the world has more than five priorities. The massive challenges to global health must be one of the government's top priorities.

Cancer
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Nicole Demers Laval, QC

Mr. Speaker, Daffodil Days, a fundraiser for the Canadian Cancer Society, was held this past March 30 to April 2. This year, I had the privilege of being the honorary chair for the City of Laval. Over $100,000 was collected, surpassing the fundraising goal of $80,000.

As a survivor of breast cancer, now in remission, I know the importance of funding research. I have experienced the anxiety, pain and suffering that this disease inflicts on individuals and their loved ones. These daffodils are a symbol of hope.

In 2005 alone, there were 149,500 new cases of cancer and 69,500 deaths attributed to this illness. Great strides have been made in research, but we must continue to support it in order to eradicate this disease. I would like to thank everyone who contributed to the success of this fundraising campaign.

Violence Against Women and Children
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, violence against women and children is a major recurring social and economic problem in our country.

On April 2, 2006 this fact was highlighted by the murder-suicide of the Mailly family of Cumberland. It appears that François Mailly killed his wife, Francine, and their three children, Jessica, Brandon and Kevin, set the house on fire and then took his own life.

Unfortunately, this type of tragedy is all too common in Canada. Studies have repeatedly shown that women are more at risk from violence in their own homes than they are in the street. It is time that we as a society recognized that the violence experienced by women and children is part of a wider social problem that requires specific attention.

All levels of government must commit to finding solutions and looking for ways to integrate violence prevention strategies in all our social programs.

Our heartfelt condolences to the Mailly family.

Liberal Leadership Campaign
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, the hare and tortoise race for the Liberal leadership has hit a hurdle. Suddenly more politicians are taking the plunge than jumping ship. The hon. academic from Massachusetts is on board, but it is one thing to be a captain of the Titanic when it hit the iceberg, it is quite another to go rushing to the bridge as the ship is headed for the bottom. We are looking forward to his support in eliminating the gun registry. I understand he is partial to the AK-47, although he is clearly not careful about whom he associates with.

Speaking of which, just about every party in the House has had the distinction of associating with the member for Kings—Hants. His razor wit has sliced and hooked so wildly through the House, I recommend his fellow candidates not join him on the golf course. Of course, they can join him for dinner. Like all good Liberals past, present and future, he will gladly pick up the tab and pass it off to the nearest taxpayer.

The former environment minister has great Liberal qualifications. His multi-million dollar announcements have expelled more greenhouse gases than have ever been pumped from an oil well. Like all Liberals, he is more sincere than coherent, but Canadians expect that from the former government.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister refused to promise to respect Canada's international commitments to the Kyoto protocol. However, a representative of the Minister of the Environment said that the government did not intend to withdraw from the protocol. There is utter confusion about the government's intentions.

I am asking once again today whether the government will respect Canada's signature with regard to the Kyoto protocol.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Multiculturalism)

Mr. Speaker, the government's intention is quite clear on this matter. It will continue to draw up a plan for Canada in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and pollutants.

This is something the former Liberal government failed to do. In fact, greenhouse gas emissions increased by 30% under that government. Even the United States had a better record than the Liberal government.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, we learned that the finance department presently concluded that the Conservatives' so-called environmental plan was ineffective and costly.

Will the minister admit that a tax credit is not an environmental plan and will the minister commit to an actual climate change plan like the one the Minister of International Trade was so proud to release last April?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Multiculturalism)

Mr. Speaker, every morning millions of Canadians are stuck in traffic jams around our big cities. Those traffic jams create pollution which creates health problems for Canadians.

For 13 years the Liberal government did nothing to address traffic congestion or to create incentives for people to use mass transit.

This government has committed and it will deliver with a tax credit for mass transit users that will help reduce traffic, reduce traffic jams and reduce pollutants in our air.

They talk, we act.

Canada-U.S. Border
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, even the Canadian Urban Transit Association disagrees with that.

American politicians have announced their intention to fight legislation requiring people to show a passport when crossing the border with Canada. Unlike American senators, our Prime Minister simply threw in the towel in Cancun.

He simply cut and ran.

Why should Canadians have to rely on American senators rather than their own Prime Minister to protect their interests?

Canada-U.S. Border
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Multiculturalism)

Mr. Speaker, obviously the Government of Canada will continue to defend the interests of Canadians and will make our American friends aware of the importance of trade between people and businesses on both sides of the border. The government will continue to work on solving these problems.

I believe the Prime Minister has asked the Minister of Public Safety to work with his American counterpart to resolve these issues as quickly as possible.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, not only did the Prime Minister cut and run from the Americans on passports, apparently his meeting with President Bush did absolutely nothing on softwood.

The U.S. ambassador is now saying that we are a year from having a deal. The Minister of International Trade has been described as a mere cheerleader on the file. Apparently President Bush is fond of the Prime Minister's position on softwood but Canadians are asking themselves, when will Canadians actually see some firm results?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Multiculturalism)

Mr. Speaker, I can tell the House this much. Canadians saw no results after five years of prejudicial American tariffs that damaged our softwood industry under that member's government. They talked but they did not act. They talked but they did not deliver.

This government is going to continue to be very forceful in asserting the Canadian position that these are illegal tariffs, and we will vigorously defend the interests of the Canadian forestry industry.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, the hon. members across the way are fond of talking about the last 12 years. Well let us talk about 12 straight years of unprecedented economic growth, eight balanced budgets, world leading debt reduction, a triple A credit rating, low interest rates, low inflation, lower taxes, 3.5 million new jobs, the lowest unemployment rate in 30 years, the best fiscal record in the G-7 and the best fiscal performance since 1867.

When can Canadians expect the $1.5 billion that we booked to help the softwood industry in this country?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

James Moore

The campaign is over, Ralph. You lost.