House of Commons Hansard #5 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was parents.

Topics

Health
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Health
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

We are now hearing the return of the catcall approach from both parties this morning. I have to say it is quite disappointing. I cannot hear myself ask a question. Canadians want to know whether or not the government is going to put a stop to the two tier system which is unfolding in Alberta.

Health
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Health and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

Mr. Speaker, I am in agreement with the hon. member that in fact we have to have innovation in our health care system, but it has to be openly accessible and universally accessible within a publicly funded system. There is a lot of innovation that can occur within that mandate.

The letter that the Prime Minister sent to the Premier of Alberta makes it clear that our recommendation is that Alberta join other provinces in establishing wait time guarantees. That was our commitment to the people of Canada and there are many innovations that can occur within the Canada Health Act.

That is our commitment to the people of Canada. That is our commitment to Albertans who are also people of Canada and voted in the election for change. We represent that change and we will follow through on that change.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Stephen Owen Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, daily reports question how the defence minister, a long time defence industry lobbyist, could possibly be free from conflict of interest.

Would the Prime Minister please explain how a minister turned lobbyist, which we would all restrict, could possibly be in a greater conflict of interest than a long time defence industry lobbyist, now turned Minister of National Defence?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, to have a conflict one has to have an interest. I own no shares in defence companies. I get no remuneration from any defence company. I have no connections with any defence companies. Therefore, there is no conflict.

Lobbyists
Oral Questions

April 7th, 2006 / 11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Stephen Owen Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of National Defence has a very narrow concept of the issue of conflict of interest, which of course also includes former colleagues and clients, all of which are lining up for defence industry contracts.

Given this ethical lapse, would the Prime Minister please at least commit to not appointing any further lobbyists as ministers with portfolios that are related to their lobbying colleagues and clients?

Lobbyists
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Multiculturalism)

Mr. Speaker, we reject the premise of the question. There are no lobbyists in the government. There are members of Parliament elected by the people and appointed to this cabinet to deliver change. That is exactly what we are going to do beginning with the federal accountability act which will be the most sweeping reform of the system of lobbyists and party financing that this country has ever seen, something that the Liberal Party never dared do.

Quebec Zoo
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative members from Quebec City, led by the Minister responsible for the Francophonie, have betrayed their constituents.

The Conservatives had promised the people of Quebec City that they would resolve the issue of the zoo, but instead they put their heads in the sand. The mayor of Quebec City and more than 65,000 people have since asked Ottawa to do something. Still nothing.

How will the Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec make up for the betrayal by his colleagues from Quebec, who, as Easter approaches, call to mind Pontius Pilate washing his hands? Will the minister also wash his hands of this issue?

Quebec Zoo
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the voters in Jonquière—Alma for again allowing me to represent them in this House.

In response to my hon. colleague from Bourassa, I will say that as a government, we intervene when the proponent of a project, in this case the Government of Quebec, asks for our assistance. This has not happened. Since we were elected, the Government of Quebec has not asked for our government's help on the issue of the zoo in Quebec City.

Quebec Zoo
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, seeing how people work on the other side of this House, I think that the Prime Minister will have to appoint another senator as minister responsible for the Quebec City region.

Could the Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec—who does not place his trust in his officials and who has decided to personally look after all his files—be proactive, as he wishes to be in his region, and provide the $35 million that the entire population of Quebec is asking for in order to save this Quebec City institution?

Quebec Zoo
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, the member went to Quebec City and rushed before the media to save the zoo. However, it is his government and the preceding minister who refused to provide Quebec City with this financial assistance.

This letter, dated June 10, 2005, and signed by the minister himself, states, “Regrettably, I must advise you that, in the present circumstances, Economic Development Canada cannot provide the funding requested”.

The honourable member should have intervened and done his work at the appropriate time.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, recent statements by the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration about implementing a refugee appeal division have us deeply worried. Before deciding whether he will go ahead in this matter, the minister told us he wants to review the immigration system as a whole. At this rate, the appeal division is nowhere near becoming a reality.

Is this review not a just a ruse to mask the intentions of the minister, who does not want an appeal division?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Medicine Hat
Alberta

Conservative

Monte Solberg Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, obviously in Canada today, we have probably the most generous system in the world when it comes to accepting refugees. They have tremendous opportunity to appeal to the courts at every level and I argue that today they do have due process. Having said that, I appreciate the hon. member's intervention and we are continuing to investigate the issue of the refugee appeal division.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, not only did several United Nations bodies vote in favour of creating a refugee appeal division, but the House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration voted unanimously in favour of creating an appeal division on December 14, 2004.

What more does the minister want before acting?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Medicine Hat
Alberta

Conservative

Monte Solberg Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the truth is that in Canada today people who are applying for refugee status sometimes spend 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 or 12 years working their way through a system. They have many avenues of appeal when it comes to determining whether or not they are refugees.

As I just said a moment ago, we will continue to investigate this, but we would never put something into legislation as the Liberals did four years ago with no intention of ever implementing it.