House of Commons Hansard #17 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

UNESCO
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that this government respects provincial jurisdictions. This government is creating an open, flexible federalism.

Today, the Prime Minister is in Quebec to sign an agreement with Quebec's federalist government. He wants to cooperate and work with all of the provinces, including Quebec, that have concerns about their voice on the international scene. Today, the Prime Minister has kept his word, and he will continue to keep his promises.

UNESCO
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, in a statement he made last December, the Prime Minister clearly recognized the international extension of Quebec's jurisdiction.

Is the Prime Minister prepared to formally commit to making no decisions on behalf of Quebec when negotiating or signing a treaty concerning a matter that falls within the province's jurisdiction unless Quebec gives him formal authorization to do so?

UNESCO
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the agreement signed in Quebec this morning is clear on all of these issues. This agreement is the result of talks between the federal government and the Government of Quebec. Quebec wanted a voice on the international stage, specifically in UNESCO. That is why we will continue to work with the Quebec delegation to UNESCO to ensure that we can work together. That is open federalism.

Justice
Oral Questions

May 5th, 2006 / 11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, something important was missing from yesterday's announcement concerning crime. For years, the NDP has been asking the government to take action against payday lenders. Such companies exploit the weaknesses of poor people and low-income workers. They charge fees that can add up to 15,000% annually.

The Liberals did nothing. Will the Conservatives make the changes needed to protect citizens from this usurious practice?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we are going to consider the matter raised by the hon. leader of the NDP. This government will always act to protect the best interests of Canadian consumers and taxpayers.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, it appears as though the government has forgotten about those who are being most exploited, those who are going to these payday loan companies and paying up to 1500% in interest. Surely this is something the government could have addressed in its legislation on the Criminal Code.

Manitoba has recently introduced legislation to regulate these profit-takers, but it requires a change to the Criminal Code before its law can come into effect.

Canadians are waiting and progressive provinces are waiting to act. Why will the government not act to stop the cruel vulture behaviour of these payday loan companies?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the minister is very aware of this issue. Federal officials have been working very closely with provincial and territorial officials to examine potential policy responses that we can make. We will be fully assessing this matter and discussing it with our provincial counterparts.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has spent his entire political career fighting against Kyoto. As head of a lobby group, he probably spent more money on anti-Kyoto advertising than his government will spend on the environment in this budget.

If the Minister of the Environment wants to be honest, why does she not admit that the government is trying to destroy the Kyoto protocol and isolate Canada? She should admit it.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, this government is committed to cleaning up the air that Canadians breathe. We made that promise to Canadians, and we will deliver on our promises.

We want Canadians to be part of the solutions on the environment and we want to help Canadians participate in cleaning up Canada. That is why we have invested $1.3 billion to build more public transit. That is why we have committed $370 million to benefit Canadians to making their choice of public transit.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, these are just more meaningless platitudes.

We know now that the government has no plan for the environment and no plan for Canadians' health. We are wondering why the Bloc Québécois is abandoning the environment to support this budget.

Will the minister finally admit that she has no plan, that she does not know where she is going and that the only thing she has managed to accomplish today is to buy the Bloc Québécois off cheap?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, after 13 years of doing nothing, I can see why there is frustration on that side. They are seeing a government that is going to do something. The difference between the Liberal plan and our plan is it is achievable. We are investing, and we will have achievable results.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, as put so eloquently by the late Hank Williams Jr., the Minister of Finance has finally shown us his “cold, cold heart”.

This morning we learn the minister has told his Ontario counterpart that over $500 million in federal funding to fight global warming has been wiped out. That money was a critical component of Ontario's plan to phase out coal-fired energy production in the province. It would have been the equivalent of taking seven million cars off the road.

Why is the government so intent on making the air Ontarians breathe even worse?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Calgary—Nose Hill
Alberta

Conservative

Diane Ablonczy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the member will be happy to know that the article on which he bases his question is inaccurate. In fact, the federal government is committed to delivering the financial commitments in the Ontario-federal agreement in an open and transparent manner, and that money will be flowing to Ontario.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment is clearly unable to defend the environment. She cannot even answer a simple question without resorting to empty platitudes.

Yesterday, she talked about the 53 smog days that Toronto had last year, and she is using this to justify her invisible made-in-Canada plan.

Why does the minister not just admit that cutting $500 million in federal funding and eliminating 12 programs will do absolutely nothing to fight climate change and reduce smog?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I agree that there was a terrible problem with smog days. We ask the member, why he did not take responsibility? That government had 13 years to clean up this mess and it did nothing.

Last year there were 53 smog days. This government is doing something. We are investing in the environment, and we will clean it up.