House of Commons Hansard #17 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

Address of the Australian Prime Minister
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I think you would find unanimous consent that Motion No. 1, concerning the Address of the Australian Prime Minister, be adopted.

Address of the Australian Prime Minister
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Is it agreed that Motion No. 1 on the order paper be adopted?

Address of the Australian Prime Minister
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Address of the Australian Prime Minister
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

(Motion agreed to)

Rights of the Unborn
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Conservative

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, it gives me pleasure to table quite a number of petitions from constituents across Canada, mostly from western Canada.

The petitioners point out that under the current federal criminal law an unborn child is not recognized as a victim with respect to violent crimes. When Olivia Talbot of Edmonton was shot and killed in November 2005, her 27 week old unborn son, Lane Jr. also died. Because we offer no legal protection for unborn children today, no charge could be laid in the death of baby Lane.

The vast majority of the public supports laws that protect unborn children from acts of violence against their mothers, which also injure or kill the baby in their womb. Forcing upon a pregnant woman the death or injury of her unborn child, is a violation of a woman's right to give life to her child and protect her child.

The petitioners call upon Parliament to enact legislation which would recognize unborn children as separate victims when they are injured or killed during the commission of an offence against their mothers, allowing two charges to be laid against the offender instead of just one.

Human Rights
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present a petition on behalf of Egyptian Christians from my constituency who are deeply concerned about the ongoing persecution of Christians who live in Egypt and across the Arab world. It has become regular practice for terrorists, extremists and even the government in Egypt to mistreat the Christian minority in that country.

It is time that we stand up against these forms of terrorism and abuse. It is time we stand up in favour of legitimate human freedoms.

Child Care
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour of presenting petitions from residents in Ontario. The petitioners call upon the Prime Minister to honour the early learning and child care agreements.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Is that agreed?

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Apparently, when I called introduction of private member's bills, the hon. member for Winnipeg Centre meant to introduce some bills. Is it agreed that we revert to introduction of private member's bills at this moment?

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Louis Riel Act
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-258, An Act respecting Louis Riel.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to introduce a private member's bill which would reverse the conviction of one of our colleagues, a fellow member of Parliament, Louis Riel, who was elected to the House of Commons three times. He was a father of Manitoba and a father of Confederation.

On behalf of the Métis people, I ask not just to have Louis Riel pardoned, but this bill calls for the conviction to be reversed. The conviction for high treason would then be found to have never taken place. He would be declared innocent of high treason and his name would be restored that way in the history books.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Canada Water Export Prohibition Act
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-259, An Act to prohibit the export of water by interbasin transfers.

Mr. Speaker, most MPs will recognize that water is the oil of the 21st century. This bill seeks to ban the bulk sale and interbasin transfer of water, recognizing, as it says in the bill, that the interbasin transfer of water is a crime against nature, offends the natural order and threatens aquatic ecosystems with invasive species and biota.

The bill would ban this practice. It would prohibit the practice for anyone who contemplates selling water in bulk through the interbasin transfer of water.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

May 5th, 2006 / 12:05 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-260, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (deductibility of expense of tools provided as a requirement of employment).

Mr. Speaker, as a tradesman, although not currently practising, I rise to stand on behalf of my fellow carpenters and other building trades workers or anyone who uses tools in a job.

Recognizing that the recent Conservative budget does acknowledge a tax deduction for the purchase of tools, this bill improves on that, if I may say so, by having no ceiling and no limit. It broadens the parameters of who would be eligible to deduct the expense of these tools for the use and the purpose of earning income.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)