House of Commons Hansard #11 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was property.

Topics

New Dawn Enterprises
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, I have the pleasure today to rise to speak about an organization in my riding called New Dawn Enterprises. It is a private, volunteer directed, not for profit organization dedicated to building community.

New Dawn has units of affordable housing located on the old radar base in Sydney, Cape Breton, which has been renamed the Pine Tree Park. The Pine Tree Park has about 40 units of affordable housing, but now only 17 are occupied. Other units cannot be occupied because the soil is contaminated.

The community council, made up of various community organizations, have taken the lead in trying to get the Department of National Defence to act.

I am calling on the Department of National Defence and the minister from Nova Scotia to take action and have this site cleaned up without delay. Currently, there are 23 units vacant and this is unacceptable as they can be occupied by families in need.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Merv Tweed Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, it is with great pride and honour that I rise today to speak about the brave men and women of 2nd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

In the new year, approximately 800 personnel from 2nd Battalion based in CFB Shilo will be deployed to Afghanistan. Although PPCLI from our local Canadian Forces Base Shilo has been active in every deployment to defend the Afghanistan people, this is by far the largest contingent. They are preparing to play a lead role in the mission to rid the country of the Taliban terrorists and bring freedom and democracy to the people.

Much has been done, but there is much more to do. I salute these brave men and women of CFB Shilo, as well as all of our Canadian troops as they continue their work defending and rebuilding the war-torn country in their quest to bring peace to the people of Afghanistan.

On behalf of the people of Brandon—Souris, myself and all Canadians, I wish them all the best and a safe return.

Seniors
Statements By Members

October 30th, 2007 / 2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Raymond Gravel Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, October 1 was International Day of Older Persons. To mark the occasion, the federation of seniors' clubs of eastern Quebec organized a seminar and invited all of the political parties. The only one to attend was the Bloc Québécois. It was clear from the seminar that the Bloc Québécois is needed, now more than ever, to relay seniors' demands to Ottawa.

Lack of representation from federalist parties says a lot about how important they think seniors are. The Bloc Québécois, on the other hand, will continue to bring seniors' demands to Ottawa. The Bloc demands full retroactive payment of all moneys owed from the guaranteed income supplement. The Bloc also demands that the government invest necessary funds in social and affordable housing, transfer funds to Quebec to provide adequate support to caregivers, and substantially increase the guaranteed income supplement.

In conclusion, my colleagues and I will continue to stand up for the men and women we now call seniors, the men and women who shaped our society.

Afghanistan
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, last Thursday the chief government whip and his wife Leah, together with Afghan Ambassador Omar Samad and his wife Khorshied, co-hosted a hugely successful shawl sale at the National Arts Centre here in Ottawa.

These beautiful scarves are hand-woven by talented women in Afghanistan, using pure silk from Herat, an ancient city in western Afghanistan.

At last week's event, 296 scarves at $80 each were sold and a total of $23,680 was raised. Every dollar will be returned to these entrepreneurs, providing them with critical financial support while promoting literacy among Afghan women and children.

We wish to thank the NAC, Apotex and all the MPs and staff who supported this effort to help women and their families in Afghanistan.

This very successful event so well demonstrates the enduring Canadian spirit of people helping people, both here, at home and around the world.

Arctic Sovereignty
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Roy Cullen Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, Arctic sovereignty begins at home, as Mary Simon, Canada's former Ambassador for Circumpolar Affairs, wisely points out.

We need to focus on positive references to northern Canada and the emphasis on Arctic sovereignty in the Speech from the Throne in order to ensure that aboriginal peoples share that vision and can take part in the sustainable development of the changing landscape in northern Canada.

This means consulting with Inuit, Métis and first nations people of the north as Canada's strategy for that region is developed.

International Polar Year runs through 2008 and marks the largest ever international program of scientific research focused on the Arctic and Antarctic regions. Thousands of scientists and researchers from more than 60 nations around the globe are participating.

Congratulations to Canadian Inuit leader Sheila Watt-Cloutier, who was a recent runner-up for the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for her work on climate change and human rights.

We have started, but more needs to be done. Let us get on with it.

Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Fabian Manning Avalon, NL

Mr. speaker, I am proud to rise today and acknowledge the hard work and dedication of the Newfoundland and Labrador members of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary.

The Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary was established in 1978 and is made up entirely of dedicated volunteers.

The courageous 924 men and women of Newfoundland and Labrador assist the Coast Guard in marine search and rescue operations and prevention. Through joint efforts they work together to achieve the common objective of preventing the loss of life.

Today in particular, I would like to highlight: Mr. John Roberts of Woody Point, Ford Ward of La Scie, George Durnford and George Fudge of Francois, Nelson Waterman of Fogo, and Raymond Cull of Joe Batts Arm, who have all recently received lifetime dedication and service awards.

As well, Claude Normore of L'anse au Loup, Kenneth Mesher of Happy Valley, Raymond Petten of Bareneed, and Perry and Glenn Burton of Lewisport, who have received their 25 year service awards.

Congratulations. Our many thanks and much applause for their great contributions.

Nuclear Weapons
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Bill Siksay Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, last Thursday the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, ICAN, was launched by Physicians for Global Survival, the Parliamentary Network on Nuclear Disarmament and Canadian Hiroshima survivor Setsuko Thurlow.

ICAN's goal is a nuclear weapons convention banning the development, possession and use of nuclear weapons.

Nuclear weapons have no military or security utility and their use can never be justified. Accidental use poses serious risk.

Nuclear weapon states continue to upgrade and build new nuclear weapons and other states seek to acquire them. De-alerting nuclear weapons must happen immediately. A no first use policy, a pledge never to initiate a nuclear exchange, must become universal.

Canada must become a nuclear weapons-free zone, call for the dismantling of nuclear weapons assigned to NATO, deny entrance to nuclear weapons in our ports, and stop exporting uranium to any nation that has nuclear weapons or has not signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

Automobile Industry
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Andrew Telegdi Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, last year the Canadian auto sector had a trade deficit for the first time since 1987 and is on track for a much larger one this year.

Massive restructuring at GM and Ford, and the huge rise of the Canadian dollar have eroded our auto trade surplus for exports to the United States. At the same time, our automotive trade deficit with the rest of the world has grown.

The result has been the loss of tens of thousands of Canadian jobs in this sector. The region of Waterloo alone has lost 2,850 auto parts jobs in the past three years due to closures and downsizing.

Canada has a $3.5 billion trade deficit with Korea, $1.7 billion of which is in the auto sector. An unfair trade deal with Korea will mean over 4,000 more jobs lost in the auto sector and over 30,000 manufacturing job losses for Canadians. We must say no to a free trade agreement with Korea.

Loco Locass
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to pay tribute to the francophone rap group Loco Locass, which was named patriot of the year by the Société Saint-Jean-Baptiste. This title is given each year to people who have distinguished themselves with their enthusiasm for defending Quebec's rights as a nation. This year's choice confirms that the younger generation in Quebec is committed and ready to continue the fight for the French language.

This francophone rap group is made up of Quebeckers of diverse and mixed origins who describe themselves as being like a quilt. French and independence are their causes and their themes, which they explore in their exquisite rhythms and wonderful lyrics.

My Bloc Québécois colleagues join me in congratulating Loco Locass on being named patriot of the year. We are proud of its commitment to defending sovereignty and the French fact.

Remembrance Day
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Bernard Patry Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to take advantage of the occasion of Remembrance Day to pay tribute to all the men and women who have fought on behalf of Canada to ensure a free and prosperous future for Canadians.

In remembering the millions of Canadians who have served their country during various conflicts, as well as the tens of thousands who have given their lives defending our ideals, we recognize the importance of their sacrifices.

These men and women believed that their actions would have a positive impact on the future and they were right.

What is all too often forgotten, however, is that when Canadians went off to war, they did so, first and foremost, to defend our values, institutions and democracy.

Thus, it is our duty to ensure that their dream of peace is realized and lasts forever. Let us never forget.

Economic Statement
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Dave Batters Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, today the statement on Canada's economic and fiscal health will be delivered outside the House of Commons because of obstructionist tactics by the NDP.

The NDP's latest move is an outrageous and hypocritical reversal of its previous position that major announcements should be made in the House.

The NDP House leader sat on a parliamentary committee which recommended that “more ministerial statements and announcements be made in the House of Commons”.

Perhaps the NDP has changed its position because it does not want Canadians to be reminded that it is under this Conservative government that the economy is growing. We have the lowest unemployment rate in 33 years and taxes are being cut, leaving more money for Canadians to spend, save and invest.

Canadians know that it is thanks to this Conservative government that they have more money in their pockets. They deserve better than petty NDP partisan games. It is time that the NDP started working with this Parliament instead of holding it back.

Elections Canada
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, on Monday, when I learned about the allegations of improper campaign spending by a Liberal MP, I took immediate action.

However, months after Elections Canada ruled against 17 Conservative MPs, the Prime Minister has done nothing and even refuses to answer questions about the Conservative electoral scam.

Why, what did he know and when did he know it?

Elections Canada
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I continue to be amazed that the Liberals rise on this issue.

I think John Ivison put it best in the National Post today when he wrote:

What can be said with confidence is that the Liberals are wasting their daily parliamentary showcase.... Unfortunately for the Liberals, it's their brand that has cornered the market on illegal party funding in recent years.

All this suggests that [the Liberal leader's] problems cannot be explained by bad luck, his poor English or his lack of charisma. Rather, it is a question of judgment. Some really questionable strategic decisions have been made by the leader.

I think that is pretty clear.

Elections Canada
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative Party would be better off reading Elections Canada rather than the National Post. It would learn that of the $1.2 million in over-the-limit election expenses for the last campaign, the Conservatives are attempting to get $800,000 back from Canadian taxpayers. The Prime Minister says nothing and does nothing but he must answer for this.

What did he know about these election shenanigans? When did he find out?

Elections Canada
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the member for Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine stood in the House and said that the member for West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country did the right thing and today it sounds like the Liberal leader agrees.

Let us review what he did according to his campaign workers: illegal cash payments, non-disclosure of campaign expenses, deliberate efforts to hide spending from Elections Canada and swept it all under the rug until it was on the front page of the Vancouver Province.

That may be what the Liberals call doing the right thing but that is what Canadians call Liberals doing business as usual.