House of Commons Hansard #16 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was problem.

Topics

Airbus
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member should not confuse the House. What is at stake here is the question of the integrity of the inquiry and of due process before the inquiry.

If the court upholds the minister's surrender order, will the Minister of Justice, pursuant to his authority, postpone the implementation of the order of surrender so that the inquiry may proceed, truth will be pursued and the oath of justice will be served?

Airbus
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is asking us to presuppose or he is posing a hypothetical question. He knows, of course, that would be highly improper and, again, anything before the courts would be improper to comment on.

Airbus
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, through access to information, we know that the Department of Justice produced files on the Airbus affair. Furthermore, we learned that the minister refused to look at those files. Yet, the minister wrote to Mr. Schreiber twice, informing him that there was no new evidence to delay his extradition.

If he never agreed to receive information about the file, how can the minister affirm that there was no new evidence? How can he make such an important decision without even examining the file?

Airbus
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, with respect to sworn allegations in an affidavit, the Prime Minister and the government have set in place a process that will be conducted, at this particular time, by Dr. Johnston who will make recommendations to the government.

However, with respect to the extradition proceedings, again, it would be highly inappropriate to comment.

Airbus
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, in less than 24 hours, a decision will be reached that could mean the removal of the key witness in this matter. The Minister of Justice has the authority and the power to ensure that Mr. Schreiber remains available to testify during a judicial inquiry.

Can the government assure us that Mr. Schreiber, the most important witness, will remain available, in person and in Canada, to testify during any inquiry or any judicial proceedings?

Airbus
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I am not in a position to ensure the outcome of any matter before the court and, precisely because the matter is before the court and to be decided within the next 24 hours, all the more reason why it would be inappropriate to comment.

Manufacturing Sector
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Finance suggested that he was considering increasing the accelerated capital cost allowance period for machinery purchases from two to five years, in accordance with one of the 22 recommendations in the unanimous report issued in February by the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. Two years is not enough time for rigorous, long-term planning.

Will the minister send a clear message to companies that have been waiting a long time for this news by announcing immediately that he is increasing the accelerated capital cost allowance period from two to five years? Will he finally give manufacturing companies in Quebec and Canada a chance?

Manufacturing Sector
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we are in the process now of lowering taxes for corporations to historically low levels in Canada, down to 15% federally by 2012. That move has been welcomed by the Quebec Manufacturers & Exporters in Quebec, as well as by the Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters association. The member is correct. There are lots of people in those associations who would like to extend the period of the accelerated capital cost allowance and that is something I assure the member that we will consider during the course of the ongoing pre-budget consultations.

Forestry Sector
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, manufacturing is not the only sector in crisis. The forestry sector is hurting as well. The accelerated capital cost allowance is only one of the 22 recommendations made by the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. The forestry sector, which is short on ready cash, needs something else. Tax cuts are completely useless when you do not turn a profit. The forestry sector needs refundable tax credits for research and development.

Will the Minister of Industry talk to his colleague, the Minister of Finance, and ask him to put these measures in place as soon as possible?

Forestry Sector
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite is, of course, right. The rising Canadian dollar vis-à-vis the U.S. dollar has a significant effect on a couple of industries, including the forestry industry and the auto industry.

However, I remind the member of the comments by the manufacturers and exporters in Quebec following the announcement of our substantial reduction in corporate taxes and how welcome it is. Yes, the accelerated capital cost allowance is also welcome, and, yes, we will consider doing more because these are sectors in the Canadian economy that are suffering disproportionately.

Electoral Representation
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, in a householder, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services boasted that the electoral representation bill, which is to be introduced this afternoon, will result in Quebec having less representation and Alberta and British Columbia having more. In light of such a statement, Quebeckers are entitled to ask whether recognizing our nation was nothing but an electoral ploy.

Is that not the real goal of this bill: to further dilute Quebec's presence in this House?

Electoral Representation
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, the document my Bloc Québécois colleague mentioned, the bill that our Conservative government will introduce today, will protect every one of Quebec's 75 seats in this House.

I hope that my Bloc Québécois colleague will not oppose our plan to protect Quebec's seats and its interests in this House.

Electoral Representation
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, that has nothing to do with the Conservatives. It is in the Canadian Constitution. He is not giving us anything at all.

If recognizing the Quebec nation truly means something to the government, it should not introduce this bill. The National Assembly unanimously agreed to a motion introduced by Premier Jean Charest—a federalist—to demand that this bill be withdrawn.

Does the Prime Minister realize that his bill conflicts with genuine recognition of the Quebec nation? Will he withdraw this bill and not introduce it?

Electoral Representation
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, my colleague does not understand. The bill protects Quebec's interests. The bill will protect Quebec's 75 seats in this House. The Bloc Québécois is making a lot of noise, but it is our Conservative government—the Minister of Labour, the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, and our new colleague from Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean—that is protecting the interests of all Canadians and all Quebeckers.

Airbus
Oral Questions

November 14th, 2007 / 2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Scott Brison Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, the justice minister was a parliamentary secretary in the Mulroney government.