House of Commons Hansard #162 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was adoption.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, we are very proud of our military. We are very proud of our Minister of National Defence. We are proud of him because he served this country in uniform for over three decades. He understands the military inside out because he has served on the front lines. As our troops are doing today, he has put himself at risk, and he made the decision to sacrifice the best years of his life in the service of his country. That is something we should all be proud of.

That is why we ask members of the opposition to treat our military with respect, from the Minister of National Defence on down, instead of with the kind of casual smear they love to throw around all the time.

National Unity
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Ken Dryden York Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, again and again the Prime Minister has tried to decide for all of us who is a real Canadian.

In 1995 the current Leader of the Opposition was in Quebec fighting for the future of this country.

As the deputy leader wrote his books and did his important work, thousands of Canadians reacted with pride.

What were the rest of us, including the Prime Minister, doing at that time?

Millions of Canadians have not spent all their lives in Canada. They grew up in Sri Lanka and Lebanon and brought all their learning here.

They are Canadians, real Canadians. When will the Prime Minister understand that?

National Unity
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, on this side of the House we are very proud real Canadians who stand up for what Canadian values are and for what Canadians believe in, everyday, ordinary middle class families, not jet-setters.

We are proud to be engaged in the world and that is important, but we also put our country first. We put Canadian sovereignty first. We put our commitment to the country first.

As for the member for Etobicoke—Lakeshore, the only reason one raises his commitment is because of his own words when he speaks of himself almost as American, when he uses phrases like the one in the New York Times of March 14: “As usual we were talking about ourselves, what America is--”

National Unity
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for York Centre.

National Unity
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Ken Dryden York Centre, ON

Once again, Mr. Speaker, it is divide, divide, divide. For 16 months for this Prime Minister, no question matters unless it is a political question. It is all about creating wedges and divides, province against province, group against group, Canadian against Canadian.

It is all about scoring political points, just like he tried to do yesterday: divide, divide, divide. When will the Prime Minister truly understand that he is the prime minister of all Canadians?

National Unity
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, every day we sit in this House and we listen to members like that launch this kind of attack against proud Canadians who are standing up for Canadian values, the Canadian values that we believe in, freedom, opportunity and hope, the values that my family came to this country for after they suffered persecution under Soviet rule and after they suffered the kind of fate that people are suffering elsewhere in the world right now under authoritarian regimes.

We are standing up for that kind of freedom because it is the most important Canadian value. We will never stop standing up for freedom.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, we are not impressed.

Despite the Prime Minister's disgraceful comments about our Leader of the Opposition during yesterday's question period, the fact remains that we still have an incompetent Minister of National Defence who should not be in charge of one of the most important departments. It is all well and good for this little Conservative government to attempt to distract us, but in the matter of funeral expenses—the latest chapter in the saga of mistakes by the Minister of Defence—the minister's behaviour and lack of compassion for the bereaved families is disgraceful and unspeakable.

Will the minister have the decency to present to this House the instructions he claims to have given in this matter, or are they also part of his imaginary world?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

South Surrey—White Rock—Cloverdale
B.C.

Conservative

Russ Hiebert Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, this government cares deeply about our soldiers. Not only has our government adopted a policy that it will compensate them above and beyond the normal funeral costs, but we have set the limit higher than the Liberals did. They set a limit of $4,600. We have repeatedly gone above and beyond that limit to compensate families.

More than that, we have repeatedly demonstrated our support for the military by providing helicopters to increase troop safety and, after years of neglect, we are building up the military and providing our troops with the safety they need to do their job in Afghanistan.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, I understand that he must back up his incompetent minister. But either there are instructions or there are none. It is not complicated. That is what we want to know.

Will the parliamentary secretary show some decency and produce the directives to prove to us, once again, that the minister misled this House? If not he should pass on the message to him and he should tender his resignation on Monday.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

South Surrey—White Rock—Cloverdale
B.C.

Conservative

Russ Hiebert Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, this government has been far more generous with the families than the previous government was. We are going to continue to compensate them and address their concerns.

I want to emphasize that unlike the previous Liberal government, we have invested heavily in our soldiers. We have provided substantial new benefits and we have invested in the care of our returning soldiers. Unlike the previous government, we care about our soldiers.

Option Canada
Oral Questions

June 1st, 2007 / 11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, in reference to the love-in, the Prime Minister said, “It was attended by Conservatives, Liberals, New Democrats, Canadians who believe in their country and have the right to believe in their country”. Of course Canadians have the right to believe in their country, but they do not have the right to violate Quebec laws. These are not minor issues.

Will the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities apologize for what he said yesterday in this house and acknowledge that it is not a minor issue to violate the Referendum Act to the tune of at least half a million dollars, not counting the cost of the love-in?

Option Canada
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, again, the leader of the Bloc Québécois is talking about something that happened 12 years ago. In the meantime, Quebec and Canada have made positive progress. In our case, this assembly here, including the leader of the Bloc Québécois, has recognized Quebeckers as a nation within Canada. I think that Quebeckers and Canadians, together, are resolutely committed to the future, and that is what is important.

Option Canada
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, when the violation of Quebec law was described as a minor issue, that was not 12 years ago; that happened yesterday. In my opinion, the minister should have the decency to apologize and acknowledge that he cannot say such things.

They tell us this happened 12 years ago and yet they are currently investigating polls that were conducted in 1990. An investigation was ordered: we are told that what happened 12 years ago has been investigated.

I want to believe them, but let them table the results of the investigation and let them apologize today, not for what happened 12 years ago, but for what was said yesterday. If they knew the Quebec nation, they would not say that breaking its laws is a “minor issue”.

Option Canada
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, that did indeed happen 12 years ago. I would like to remind the leader of the Bloc Québécois that one of the first things this government did was to finally cut off funding to the Canadian Unity Council, which, as you know, was the impetus to creating Option Canada.

Option Canada no longer exists. If the leader of the Bloc Québécois or his colleagues try to reach Option Canada, the phone will ring for a long time and the message will be that the number they have dialled is no longer in service.

Option Canada
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister confirmed yesterday that Justice Grenier had the full cooperation of the federal government during his investigation. That is entirely untrue. The federal government sent a lawyer who added numerous interventions specifically to prevent careful examination of federal spending.

Why did the government go to so much trouble to protect the Liberals, Conservatives and the NDP from the investigation? What are they all trying to hide?