House of Commons Hansard #103 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was workers.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, I can hear the oil executives quaking in their boots after a spin like that.

The Dene and the Cree in Fort Chipewyan are living with the consequences of irresponsible development of what happens when the impacts are considered only after the oil starts flowing rather than before, as it should be.

In Alberta, it means disappearing drinking water for first nations and local communities, while greenhouse gas emissions spin out of control, all this while the Conservatives continue to grant obscene billion dollar subsidies to the most profitable sector in Canada's economy.

Will the government use all its powers at hand and stop this crime? Will it stop the dangerous plans of Imperial Oil that would put 800,000 more cars on the road?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we will ensure rigorous environmental assessments are done before any sensitive ecosystems take place.

I want to thank the NDP for being brave enough to stand with those of us in the government against the Liberals' carbon tax plan. Why are the NDP against the carbon tax plan? They know it would hurt seniors living on fixed incomes. They know it would hurt people in Atlantic Canada who have to use home heating fuel for their homes. It would be the death nail of rural Canada. It would be a new tax on heating hot water.

Thank goodness the NDP is finally standing up against a new tax.

Health
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, the health minister falsely claims that the science on Insite is mixed and, therefore, we should get rid of it. This gives me a bad feeling of déjà vu.

Was this not the tactic of big tobacco and Conservative climate change deniers to block needed action for so long: claim there is a scientific debate when, in fact, the scientists agree there is none?

Will the minister stop imposing his right wing ideology on Canadians, respect the court ruling and let Insite continue to save lives?

Health
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Health and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

Mr. Speaker, the expert advisory committee was very clear. It found that only 3% of those who attend Insite actually get referred to treatment and that only 10% of those who use Insite use it for all their injections.

The expert advisory committee insisted that Insite only saved one life, and that life is important but I want to save more than one life. I want to save hundreds of lives around the downtown eastside, which is why we are focused on treatment and on professionals. Not one life should be lost.

Cluster Bombs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Brian Storseth Westlock—St. Paul, AB

Mr. Speaker, last Friday, the international community formally recognized the grave consequences that inhumane cluster munitions cause to innocent civilians around the world. This was an historic day for countries such as Canada that have never used these weapons and also for the victims who have had to live through the adverse effects of the irresponsible use of cluster bombs.

It should be recognized that once again Canada has demonstrated leadership by being one of the original signatory states in leading the fight for victim assistance within this treaty.

Would the Minister of Foreign Affairs tell us what Canada's position is regarding the outcome of this new treaty?

Cluster Bombs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway
B.C.

Conservative

David Emerson Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Westlock—St. Paul for his many years of diligent work on this very issue.

Canada is proud to join over 100 countries in welcoming the text of this very important treaty that addresses the humanitarian and developmental costs of cluster munitions. This text, endorsed unanimously by the participating countries, includes language to prohibit the use, production, stockpiling and transfer of cluster munitions. It requires existing stocks to be destroyed--

Cluster Bombs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Sydney--Victoria.

Tourism
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, The Economist states that the tourism industry worldwide has increased 6% and yet Statistics Canada states that the number of travellers to Canada has fallen to a record low, a 12.5% drop over last year.

Many tourist operators are facing a crisis and feel they are on their own with no help from the government. Many recommendations were brought forward to the House but no action has been taken.

Why is the government not showing any leadership in helping this vital industry?

Tourism
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the member is not correct in his facts. Tourism continues to be a thriving industry in this country. The secretary of state continues to work on this file. We will continue to make progress.

Throughout the country, we will continue to welcome people from overseas and from the United States, and that will be the success of the industry.

Presence in the Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

It is with great pleasure that I draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of 12 members of the Canadian Forces who are taking part in Canadian Forces Day today.

Canadian Forces Day is an opportunity for Canadians across the country to recognize the sacrifices that our men and women in uniform make on our behalf.

Presence in the Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to three petitions.

Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

June 2nd, 2008 / 3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the third report of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.

National Defence
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Rick Casson Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the third report of the Standing Committee on National Defence in relation to its study on health services provided to Canadian Forces personnel, with an emphasis post-traumatic stress disorder.

Telecommunications Clarity and Fairness Act
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-555, An Act to provide clarity and fairness in the provision of telecommunication services in Canada.

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate having 30 seconds or so to speak to this bill, which would direct the Minister of Industry to amend the conditions for PCS and cellular spectrum licences to include a prohibition against the levying of any additional fee or charge that would not part of a subscriber's monthly fee or monthly plan rate.

It also would require the government to direct the CRTC to gather information and seek input and make a major report on competition, consumer protection and consumer choice issues relating to telecommunication services in Canada.

I hope this goes some distance in addressing what many Canadians believe to be unfairness and a lack of transparency in the charging for services that are occurring on a monthly basis, including system access fees, which the federal government ceased requiring to be collected by the telephone companies some 21 years ago. Still today 18.5 million Canadian cellphone users are paying monthly charges. We intend to address this through the bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)