House of Commons Hansard #2 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was canada's.

Topics

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Foreign Affairs. President Obama has closed the prison in Guantanamo and suspended proceedings against Mr. Khadr.

My question for the minister is simple. Mr. Khadr is a child soldier. Why is Canada not shouldering its responsibilities and bringing Mr. Khadr back to Canada?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question. Our position on Mr. Khadr remains unchanged. In fact, two previous Liberal governments took the same position. Mr. Khadr has been charged with serious crimes, including murder, attempted murder, conspiracy, providing material support for terrorism and spying.

We are continuing to monitor the situation and the work of the American committee set up to consider the fate of the detainees in Guantanamo, including Mr. Khadr.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Khadr was recruited at the age of 13. He was arrested at the age of 15. He has been incarcerated for nearly seven years. I wonder how the minister can, in all conscience, not recognize that while the position of the Government of Canada may be unchanged, regardless of the circumstances, the fact remains that the President of the United States, who we will be welcoming here shortly, has in fact carried out a whole series of changes.

When will somebody turn the lights on over on that side of Parliament and recognize that the world is changing around them and that Canada needs to take its responsibility for one of our own citizens?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, our position regarding Mr. Khadr remains unchanged. It is exactly the same position as two previous Liberal governments. The problem here is that no charges have been dropped against this individual, on the one hand.

Where there is inconsistency is in the Liberal Party's position. As a matter of fact, the leader of the Liberal Party would want to have this individual come back to Canada; whereas the hon. colleague who has just asked me the question, the member for Toronto Centre, would want to set up a special committee to look at this problem. So, what is the issue? In--

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Halifax West.

Nuclear Energy
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government was so busy leaking budget highlights that it forgot to let Canadians know about serious security issues at Chalk River. In December, there was a spill involving radioactive material at the nuclear facility. Why did the accident happen? What human health and environmental impact assessments were carried out, and why was the public not informed?

Nuclear Energy
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the health and safety of Canadians is always our foremost concern. In fact, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and AECL, the operator, were on the ground working together during the stoppage of the NRU and, as well, they were working together during this incident at Chalk River. I have been informed that Chalk River has had no adverse effects on human health or the environment during this period of time. As I mentioned, CNSC was on site, and the communications were in place between AECL and CNSC. Regardless, I have asked for a written report on the incident and CNSC officials continue to work with AECL in these matters.

Nuclear Energy
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, Canadians deserve the truth and transparency when it comes to nuclear safety and oversight, but they have a government that interferes with independent regulators and keeps them in the dark. The leak remains ongoing, with thousands of litres of low-level radioactive water being dumped into the Ottawa River.

What is being done to solve this and why was the public not informed?

Nuclear Energy
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, as indicated already, at no time did any of the events that took place at Chalk River have an adverse effect on human health or the environment. The health and safety of Canadians is always our foremost concern.

The reactor at Chalk River continues to operate consistently and meets all safety regulations and security regulations. We continue to work with CNSC to ensure safety requirements at Chalk River labs continue today.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the fact that the environment was not mentioned even once in the Speech from the Throne shows just how little this government cares about climate change issues. One of the first things the Minister of the Environment did was defend the oil sands, thereby demonstrating his utter submission to the oil companies.

Can the government explain why the Speech from the Throne was silent on the subject of the environment despite the fact that the future of the economy is inextricably linked to the environment?

The Environment
Oral Questions

January 27th, 2009 / 2:35 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we disagree. It is right there in black and white in our platform, and we have now made a commitment in this area. We will implement a North American cap and trade system for greenhouse gas emissions and atmospheric pollution, and we will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020. These major commitments represent more than any other party has done.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the problem is that the minister says one thing one day and another the next. He needs to understand that the economy and the environment go hand in hand. Take, for example, the mayor of Rivière-du-Loup, who said that his city cannot be listed on the European carbon exchange without clear Canadian targets. As a result, the city's disposal site is losing hundreds of thousands of dollars every year.

How can the government fail to realize that, even at that level, the environment can be profitable?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, that is not the case. We are working on that issue with the United States. For example, the government has decided to harmonize its plan with the provinces, to adopt North American automobile fuel standards, and to introduce a regulatory system for greenhouse gas emissions for various industries.

Arts and Culture
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebec's minister of culture is taking up the cause again and has stated that artists must recoup the money cut last year by the federal government in order to continue obtaining international exposure.

During his recent tour of Quebec, the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages demonstrated that he is a good listener. However, can he confirm for us today that he is also very capable of taking action by announcing that he will restore the monies eliminated for international tours?

Arts and Culture
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for her question. She ought to know that our government will invest $21 million in our artists working internationally.

We will also invest $2.3 billion in our artists, the largest amount ever budgeted by the federal government. We are investing in our artists to add to the quality of life of Canadians in every region of our country. We are giving to artists. It is a real problem for the Bloc Québécois, because every time that we increase our investments, the Bloc Québécois votes against it.