House of Commons Hansard #99 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was fraud.

Topics

Health
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, that member has gone too far.

She has accused this Conservative government of resembling the previous Liberal government. That is beyond the pale. The previous Liberal government cut health care in this country, increased wait times, and put our health care system in crisis.

This government, however, is fixing the problem. We have resolved the fiscal imbalance, increased funds to the provinces, and respected the Canada Health Act. We are getting the job down.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

October 23rd, 2009 / 11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Thierry St-Cyr Jeanne-Le Ber, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism claims not to have known that Phares Pierre was an influential member of the Aristide government before he appointed him to the immigration board. No one believes the minister, seeing as this compromising piece of information was struck out of the initial draft of the press release announcing the appointment.

Assuming the minister did not know, now that he does know, will he act and remove Phares Pierre?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

St. Catharines
Ontario

Conservative

Rick Dykstra Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, it was this government that actually brought a merit-based appointment system to the IRB. Candidates for appointments are now screened by the IRB before they are recommended to the minister. The Auditor General, Sheila Fraser, recognized these changes when she said in the spring that there were changes to the system and the process would appear to be fairly rigorous.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Thierry St-Cyr Jeanne-Le Ber, QC

Mr. Speaker, I fail to see any merit in being a part of the Aristide government.

This file is riddled with improprieties. An unsavoury character was appointed. Attempts were made to hide part of his past. Then, once it was revealed, the minister refused to revoke this shameful appointment.

When will the minister assume his responsibilities and remove this Conservative militant from the immigration board?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

St. Catharines
Ontario

Conservative

Rick Dykstra Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite has previously brought this to the attention of the minister. He has received his response to the question. He may not like the response to the question, but he received it.

I would ask the member and his party, instead of working against the changes we are trying to make to our refugee system, the changes that will make it better, the changes that need to be made because of the condition it was left in by the previous government, to work with us on those changes to make sure that we have a system that continues to be one that is the best in the world.

Health
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, this week I visited Grassy Narrows to attend the Grand Council Treaty No. 3 annual general assembly. Those present expressed grave concerns regarding the lack of preparedness for H1N1. I have heard similar fears from aboriginal communities across Canada.

The minister asserts that 90% of aboriginal communities have pandemic plans in place. The people on the ground say otherwise. Starting with the truth, what assurances could the minister provide today that the most vulnerable will be protected and that unnecessary deaths will be avoided?

Health
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the first thing the member needs to know is that the health and safety of all Canadians is the first priority of this Conservative government. We have invested over $1 billion for our preparedness and response to public health threats, such as the flu pandemic situation. This includes planning in first nations communities.

The minister has spoken to Chief Atleo regarding the issue, as well as with several other chiefs affected in communities, particularly in Saskatchewan, B.C. and Manitoba.

Health
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives are spending over $100 million promoting themselves in their partisan ad campaign and just $6 million promoting and protecting Canadians against H1N1.

Communications has been a fiasco, from body bags to confusing messages, so that now only one-third of Canadians say they will get the vaccine.

The H1N1 pandemic is here. If the government finally has a communications plan for aboriginal Canadians and 90% of those communications plans have been in place for aboriginal communities, will the minister table those plans in the House today?

Health
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for addressing the important question of communicating with Canadians about this crisis. That is exactly what our government has done.

This government has been acting on the H1N1 situation since day one. We have launched ad campaigns for television, radio and print. We have provided weekly updates to the health committee. We announced the flu preparedness kit last week. Since then we have received 60 million hits on the information website—

Health
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

An hon. member

Sixty thousand.

Health
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Nepean—Carleton, ON

It is 60,000. I thank the member for his correction.

This booklet will also be sent out across the country to ensure that people have the information.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Bill Siksay Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, Mohammad Mahjoub is still being detained without charge, trial or conviction on a security certificate. It has been nine years. He is still the only prisoner at the double maximum Kingston Immigration Holding Centre and he is still on his hunger strike, now at 144 days, over the lack of an independent complaints process.

His hunger strike is extremely serious. Permanent serious health consequences or death could happen at any moment.

What has the Minister of Public Safety done to resolve this situation? Is he pursuing mediation and will he allow the correctional investigator jurisdiction?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, as you know, the safety and security of Canadians is of utmost concern to this government. These matters have been dealt with a number of times in the House.

This matter is one that we are aware of and the matter is being looked into with the individual involved.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of National Defence and PMO officials have stated that Canada will continue training the army and the police forces in Afghanistan post-2011 but end combat operations.

Now, General Hillier tells us:

If you stay in the south and try to do something like training, you will still be in combat. I don't care what...staffers say in the media about how they can find a way to do it. You simply will not. You will be in combat.

The question, obviously, is: Who do we believe? Do we believe the government and its spin doctors or do we believe the general?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, what the hon. member should believe is the truth. The government has been clear, the Prime Minister has been clear and the minister has been clear: the military mission comes to an end in 2011.

We will maintain an ongoing presence in our governance and development work. In the meantime, we will be continuing the training and mentoring of the Afghan national security forces to protect the local population.

A well-led, well-trained, well-equipped Afghan force will enable the government of Afghanistan to assume increasing responsibility for its own security.