House of Commons Hansard #106 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-50.

Topics

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the reality is that Canada has more doses per capita than any other country in the world. That is the reality.

That is the reality on the ground. That is what Canadians care about. That is what they should care about. That is why we are working with public health officials, the provinces and territories to deal with this situation to the best of our ability. The hon. member is simply playing politics if he wishes to dispute that.

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, the role of pandemic planning is backup, backup, backup.

The U.S. government ordered vaccine from five companies: Sanofi Aventis, CSL Limited, Novartis AG, GlaxoSmithKline and MedImmune.

Why did the Conservative government order two different vaccines and limit Canada to just one supplier? Why did the government make things worse by interfering in the supplier's production plan?

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member and her caucus still refuse to accept the reality on the ground that we have more vaccine per capita than the United States, than the U.K., than Japan, than anywhere else in the world.

Six million doses have been distributed to date. That is the reality on the ground. That is what Canadians care about. That is what we care about and that is what we will continue to care about.

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government claims six million vaccines have been shipped, but Canadians are wondering where they are. The anxiety they face would be greatly alleviated if these six million vaccines meant six million Canadians had been vaccinated, but something has gone wrong, because the federal government failed to live up to its federal responsibility when faced with a pandemic.

When will the Conservatives release the $400 million set aside for pandemic response to get Canadians vaccinated as fast as possible?

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member should know better than most that this is week one of the largest mass immunization campaign in the country's history, week one. The hon. member knows better than most that it takes eight to twelve weeks to distribute, deliver and access that vaccine for all 33 million Canadians. Those are the facts on the ground.

We have allowed to be distributed six million doses. That is more than enough for the priority groups that are the first groups in week one and week two. The member should be applauding the public health officials rather than criticizing this program.

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Malo Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, federal authorities have acknowledged that they were poorly prepared and that some clinics will have to close because of a lack of vaccine. My question is for the Minister of Natural Resources who, speaking about the current Minister of Health, said: “I really hope she never gets anything hot”.

Would the Minister of Natural Resources not agree that the Minister of Health's behaviour is confirming her worst fears?

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, once again, 6 million doses of the vaccine have now been sent to the provinces and territories for public health. That is now the reality in Canada. Canada has more doses of the vaccine per capita than any other country in the world. That is the reality.

We are proud to work with all public health officials and public health agencies across the country and with all provinces and territories to protect the health and safety of Canadians.

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Malo Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, while the government pretends to have a handle on the H1N1 crisis, the Auditor General is criticizing the government for not having an emergency response plan for things like pandemics. Since 2004, the federal government has failed to produce an emergency response plan that allows the departments to communicate with one another.

Will the Conservatives admit that, in the case of the current crisis, they have been caught with their pants down?

Health
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the reality is, once again, that our government announced a new action plan in 2006 to deal with the flu and pandemics. This is our record.

We have done this in consultation with the provinces, the territories and public health officials. We did that back in 2006. We are proud of that record. However, right now we are focused on ensuring that all parts of the country get the vaccine they need.

The Environment
Oral Questions

November 3rd, 2009 / 2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canada is once again under fire from the executive secretary of the Rio climate convention, Yvo de Boer, who has accused developed countries of not being ambitious enough with their greenhouse gas reduction targets. Canada is the worst of the bunch, with a reduction target of only 3% by 2020.

How can Canada be happy with such pathetic reduction targets, when we need reductions of 25% to 40% by 2020 in order to prevent the dramatic and irreversible effects of global warming?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, that is not the case. If there is an isolationist party in this House, it is the Bloc Québécois. It proposes an emission exchange, a carbon exchange with European targets, when we know that the Americans are not interested. Experts agree that a carbon exchange without the United States is doomed to failure. The Bloc Québécois should work with the government to combat climate change.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, we do not need any lectures from a government that received a Fossil of the Day award today in Barcelona. That is quite something.

African nations have issued an ultimatum, demanding that developed countries set specific greenhouse gas reduction targets for 2012-20. Instead of toadying up to the oil companies, which think Canada is already doing too much to reduce greenhouse gases, why is the minister not instead listening to those who think that Canada is not doing enough?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, these are some of the toughest environmental negotiations with which Canada has ever been involved. Canada wants to see a successful international treaty negotiated in Copenhagen. This government will have tough, capable negotiators at the table. We will not be boy scouts. The Liberals tried that. That is how we ended up with a Kyoto protocol with unattainable targets.

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Brian Murphy Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, NB

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' inaction on H1N1 speaks volumes about their priorities. Spending $45 million on 6,000 propaganda posters is more important to them than the influenza. This is backwards. People should come before politics.

Why are the Conservatives putting politics ahead of the health of Canadians?

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, again, from coast to coast to coast in Canada, 6 million doses of H1N1 vaccine have now been sent to the provinces and territories.

That is the reality on the ground. We have been working and constantly conveying our messages to the people of Canada about the importance of preparing for this second part of the outbreak. That has been the responsibility of the Minister of Health and she has been doing that, along with the Chief Public Health Officer. They have been working on behalf of Canadians. The hon. members opposite should do so as well.