House of Commons Hansard #76 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was auto.

Topics

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

You left Ontario with a big deficit and now you are doing the same thing to all of Canada.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Whitby—Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, I can hear the member for Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine. She might want to listen so she will understand what is going on in terms of the deficit. She might want to read the document.

The member for Markham—Unionville's former employer, the Royal Bank of Canada, has predicted economic growth at 2.5% in 2010.

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Natural Resources is trying to play down the isotope crisis by saying that 75% of our needs are being met. But representatives from the medical community are criticizing the lack of vision of the Liberals and Conservatives, who have let this situation deteriorate over the years.

How can the minister justify her reassuring statements when everyone is denouncing the fact that thousands of patients have had their tests delayed indefinitely?

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, one thing that is clear is that this is a global issue. In fact, we are working with the other producing countries in the world with respect to reactor schedules and we have had a very positive response.

It is under Canada's leadership that Petten increased its amount of medical isotopes produced, as was done in South Africa as well. Those isotopes are coming into the country this week. We will be able to have 75% of our total medical isotopes.

However, we continue to work. The Minister of Health continues to work with the medical establishment. We will continue to work with the reactors to get this done right.

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, aside from making a last-minute, cosmetic research announcement, does the government plan on listening to nuclear medicine specialists, who got together and have called on the government to provide adequate funding for the production of isotopes, to build new reactors and to update the existing ones?

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, as mentioned in our five-point plan in December of last year, one of the issues that the department was looking into was exactly what kinds of proposals were out there for alternative means of producing medical isotopes.

Last week we did announce that there will be an expert review panel to take a look at all of these reports and suggestions that are coming in from institutions as well as universities in terms of an alternate way of producing medical isotopes. They will be reviewing them over the summer. We look forward to receiving the results.

Bisphenol A
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Malo Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, according to a study released yesterday, the effects of endocrine disrupting substances are responsible for the shrinking gap in the birth weights of newborn boys and girls between 1981 and 2003. Bisphenol A, which the government has banned in the manufacture of baby bottles, is one of those substances.

Now that the toxic effect of these substances on the fetus has been established, will the government finally ban this product in the manufacture of all food and beverage containers, as called for by the Bloc Québécois for over a year now?

Bisphenol A
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, our government has a strong record of taking action on bisphenol A.

As part of the chemical management plan, this government carefully evaluated the potential health effects of BPA and concluded that the general population does not need to be concerned. However, to protect newborns and infants, this government wanted to be prudent. That is why we are proceeding to ban the baby bottles made with BPA.

Canadians expect actions by their government when it comes to their safety and we are taking action.

Bisphenol A
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Malo Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is not enough. These substances attack the human reproductive system, with the negative end result of fewer and fewer boys being born. The CBC reported the case of a first nations community near Sarnia, Ontario where the proportion of newborn boys was under 35% in 2003.

Does the government plan to better regulate the use of chemicals, such as bisphenol A, which researchers have identified as the source of the problem?

Bisphenol A
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, as part of the government's chemical management plan, we will continue to evaluate these situations. We take them very seriously. I look forward to having a dialogue with my colleague on the very issues he has expressed. We will look into that.

At the same time, I can say that Canadians expect action and we have taken action on this issue.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

June 16th, 2009 / 2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Michael Savage Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, the incompetence of the government is staggering. Each day it fiddles around while the unemployment situation deteriorates, bankruptcies continue to rise and household debt spins out of control. Each day we hear stories of constituents who have fallen through the cracks of our social infrastructure and are getting little help from the government.

How can the government leave this Friday for the barbecue circuit knowing that its inaction on the economy and EI has left tens of thousands of Canadians without a way out of this Conservative recession?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we have done a lot to help Canadians in these troubled economic times.

We have expanded EI. We have expanded the work sharing program. We are offering unprecedented assistance to help laid-off workers get the training they need for future jobs.

My question for the hon. member is, how could those members have us leave here this Friday night after voting against these measures that would help Canadians? If we leave Friday night and they have voted against the supplementary estimates (A), we will not get the funding for the strategic training and transition fund. We will not get the money for the Canada summer jobs. We will not get the money for the targeted initiative for older workers.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Michael Savage Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, the minister is becoming more and more robotic in her answers, showing an astounding lack of understanding of the real pain that Canadians are feeling.

Job losses continue, uncertainty reigns, and the government has no coherent plan to help the unemployed. The Conservatives' only plan is to mislead Canadians when they talk about changes to EI, saying it would create a 45-day work year. What she is saying is that she thinks Canadians are lazy. The Liberals do not think that Canadians are lazy. She should apologize to Canadians.

Why is the minister unwilling to make changes to EI now?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, all three of the opposition parties have put forward a proposal for a 360-hour work requirement to collect employment insurance benefits. That works out to 45 work days. That is nine weeks. Then they said that would give people 39 weeks of benefits. Thirty-nine and nine equals forty-eight, plus the two-week wait period makes fifty weeks. Near as I can reckon, that is close to a year. They are saying if people work 45 days, they will get a year's benefits.

Canadians do not want that. We will not support that because it will not create jobs and it will not help the economy.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Crombie Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, William from my riding had a good job working for a contracting company for almost 20 months. During this period he worked over 630 hours, the minimum requirement in Mississauga. When William applied for his EI, he was denied. He appealed, but he was denied again. He was told he only had 619 hours, because his hours were calculated from the end of his pay period, not from his last day of work, a small but devastating technicality.

Thousands of Canadians are in the same boat. William and others want to know, why will the government not make EI fair for all Canadians?