House of Commons Hansard #86 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was pumps.

Topics

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Kootenay—Columbia
B.C.

Conservative

Jim Abbott Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, apparently the member has missed what we have actually ended up doing. We were the first G8 country to double our aid to Africa. We doubled our aid to Africa before we were required to and before any other G7 nation. We are now at $2.1 billion. On top of that, at the conference the Prime Minister came up with some new money again for the African nations because we recognize that they do require our support.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Raynald Blais Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, QC

Mr. Speaker, on October 13, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans finally announced new measures to help lobster fishers weather the effects of plummeting market prices. While this announcement is a good first step for the fishers in the Magdalen Islands, it ignores the fishers in the Gaspé who have also made efforts to conserve this resource.

Will the government modify the program's criteria so that it helps all the fishers affected by plummeting lobster prices?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Egmont
P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, the long-term sustainability of the lobster industry has been a focus of our government and we are well on our way to achieving that goal. We have announced $10 million over the last year in marketing moneys, over $8 million in short-term support and, in addition, over $50 million to the long-term program. All areas of the lobster fishery are eligible for funding.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, let us be clear. Omar Khadr's circumstances have little to do with guilt or innocence and everything to do with politics.

Under the terms of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, Omar Khadr was a child combatant. The Conservative government's refusal to repatriate him has been an unqualified international embarrassment and now, at the last minute, Khadr has accepted a plea deal to save himself from a life sentence in Leavenworth Prison.

What steps has the government undertaken with the American government to bring that Canadian home?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Khadr pleaded guilty to murder in violation of the laws of war, attempted murder in violation of the laws of war, as well as providing material support for terrorism and spying, as well as conspiracy. The media are reporting that Mr. Khadr also publicly acknowledged that he was a member of al-Qaeda, that he planted roadside bombs and that he knew he was attacking civilians.

The matter is between the U.S. government and Mr. Khadr's lawyers and we have no further comment.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Reid Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians were profoundly shocked at the revelation that veteran Sean Bruyea had his information shared inappropriately by bureaucrats at Veterans Affairs Canada.

Would the Minister of Veterans Affairs tell the House what steps are being taken to address this profoundly serious issue?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, today I have offered our government's sincere regrets to Mr. Bruyea and anyone who may have gone through the same situation.

I wish to report that the Government of Canada is immediately undertaking an expedited mediation procedure in this case. As I said, we will be co-operating with regard to the in-depth audit being conducted by the Privacy Commissioner and we will take action and follow up on the results and recommendations.

Meanwhile, I have already taken measures and actions to ensure that the privacy of veterans is protected.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative Prime Minister has made a number of diplomatic blunders on the international scene. First came the humiliating loss of the UN Security Council seat, then the government was nowhere to be seen at the Sommet de la Francophonie.

When will the Prime Minister take on a leadership role on the international scene, and when will he start behaving like the representative of such a major player as Canada?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, Canada's leadership on the international scene has been outstanding. Moments ago, my hon. colleague booed Canada's role abroad. She seems to have forgotten what this government did for the people of Haiti. She seems to have forgotten even though these people are close to home for her. This government has been strong and has shown leadership. It has done much more in that area than the previous government, and we are proud of that.

Taxation
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Daniel Paillé Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, while the Minister of Finance is scraping the bottom of the barrel, the government is missing out on billions of dollars in unpaid taxes because of its own turpitude. It is all well and good to try to recover the money hidden in Switzerland by white collar criminals, but charges also need to be brought against them, so their crimes do not go unpunished. If pinching is stealing, then hiding is defrauding.

Can the minister guarantee us that all those who use foreign bank accounts to evade taxes will be criminally prosecuted?

Taxation
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Conservative

Keith Ashfield Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, our government is taking very aggressive action to crack down on any moneys being hidden in offshore bank accounts. Just last year, over $1 billion was uncovered in unpaid taxes, nearly 10 times the amount that was uncovered in the last year the Liberals were in power.

In terms of the penalties, I can say that fines, penalties, interest and jail time are all part of the package.

International Trade
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, after the softwood lumber sell-out, the shipbuilding sellout and other sellouts, the government is now throwing everything on the table in a desperate act to sign the worst possible trade deal with one of the best possible partners, the European Community.

Why will the minister not reveal to Parliament the specific costs and negative impacts of this deal now, on government procurement policy, on Canada's supply management sector, on the lives of Canadian farmers and on concessions to big pharma, to name but a few?

Will the minister come clean now and reveal these costs and impacts, and end the secrecy so Canadians can know what is at stake?

International Trade
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, of course, the hon. member knows the answer before I give it. In this time of economic uncertainty, our government is working to open new doors for Canadian businesses and help create jobs.

The economic agreement with the European Union has the potential to generate a $12 billion boost to our economy and increase bilateral trade by over 20%.

We will continue to work closely with all of our partners, including the provinces and the territories, and we are pleased to have found a way to involve them in this negotiation.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order to clarify the record.

In response to a question from the Bloc member from Quebec, I referred to compensating the people of Quebec. I should have used the word “assist”, as the support actually went to the municipality as opposed to directly to people. This is the matter of a court case, so I wanted to clarify the record.

Public Accounts
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

October 25th, 2010 / 3 p.m.

Liberal

Joe Volpe Eglinton—Lawrence, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 19th report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts on Chapter 5, “Acquiring Military Vehicles for Use in Afghanistan” of the fall 2009 report of the Auditor General of Canada.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to the 19th report.