House of Commons Hansard #80 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was veterans.

Topics

Canadian Forces
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I proudly wore the uniform of the Canadian Forces for over 30 years and I can tell members it is an honourable calling and career.

Our men and women fighting in Afghanistan are performing incredible work under difficult circumstances. They are fighting to bring security to the Afghan people. They are fighting so that young girls can go to school. They are fighting so that women can see a doctor for health care.

This video is outrageous fiction by irresponsible individuals who should be ashamed of themselves. I know Canadians are proud of our brave and courageous members of the Canadian Forces.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, in 2005, a crab management plan for crab fishing areas 23 and 24 was put into place that fishers felt would bring long-term sustainability and stability to the area.

A fifty-fifty sharing mechanism was to be triggered when the total allowable catch reached 9,700 tonnes. However, once that number was reached, the minister chose not to honour this agreement and maintained the 60-40 formula which favoured 40 fishers while disadvantaging over 700.

Will the minister commit today to honouring the original agreement?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I welcome my colleague to his new role as the fisheries and oceans critic.

The decision he refers to was made after considerable discussion with a number of stakeholders, all stakeholders in fact. Various sharing options were considered. This one was implemented based on the principle of equity. The process was fair and open. The majority of participants support this decision, and this is the decision that we are staying with. Changing this decision would destabilize the industry, and we do not plan to do that.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

October 8th, 2010 / 11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois's Bill C-395 was adopted at second reading by a majority in this House. It aims to correct an aberration in the Employment Insurance Act in order to ensure that the weeks of a labour dispute are not used to calculate benefits. The workers at Lebel-sur-Quévillon would have benefited from this bill.

Does the government intend to grant a royal recommendation to this bill so that it continues on to the Senate?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Souris—Moose Mountain
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, of course we would take an impartial position with respect to the bill. The government does not interfere in specifics like strike action and capping those days. Both employers and employees contribute to the program. It would be improper for us to involve ourselves in that area.

Member for Nepean--Carleton
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, like most members of Parliament, I am very proud of the hard-working police on Parliament Hill. They maintain a respectful balance between national security while maintaining an open public space for Canadians. Yet yesterday, the Prime Minister's parliamentary secretary thumbed his nose at the police and committed a major flagrant breach.

The government seems to think rules are for other people: zero tolerance for citizens; queue jumping for ministers.

We know the member was caught and publicly spanked, but will the government take responsibility and send a clear message that it does not tolerate that abusive attitude from its ministers?

Member for Nepean--Carleton
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the RCMP officers on Parliament Hill work hard. They have a difficult responsibility and they do an outstanding job. They deserve our full support.

The member in question has spoken to this. I should point out that the member is a hard-working member. He delivers for his constituency. He makes an excellent contribution to this place and is a big asset to the government.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Nina Grewal Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal public safety critic continues to side with criminals. First he talked about dramatically cutting sentences, and now he wants to delay our legislation to eliminate accelerated parole with a cost analysis.

Victims already know the true cost of crime. When will the Liberals do what is right and commit to keeping criminals behind bars?

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety please update this House on our efforts to keep criminals behind bars?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for her hard work on this very important file.

The Liberal public safety critic continues to ask the wrong questions. It is becoming ever more clear that he is more concerned with a cost analysis than a justice analysis.

This is about right and wrong. We believe it is right for victims' rights to come first. We know it is wrong for criminals to be released after only serving one-sixth of their sentence.

We call on the Liberals to finally put justice first and support Bill C-39.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

Noon

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, the crab plan was developed by an independent expert panel and signed off by a former minister of fisheries, Loyola Hearn.

It has been learned through access to information that DFO staff recommended reconvening this panel for a day in order to offer its interpretation of the rule and settle this issue once and for all.

I ask today, in order to bring peace and stability to this area and to this issue, will the minister act on the advice of DFO and agree to reconvene the expert panel for its final interpretation?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

Noon

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned earlier, this decision was made very carefully by the previous minister.

All stakeholders were involved in this. The process was fair and open. The majority of participants supported this decision where an equal share of the quota would go to all licences.

This was a decision made in equity, and in our opinion and as the minister has reviewed this decision, it is our conclusion that reconvening a panel would accomplish nothing and would destabilize the industry.

The Environment
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Bruce Hyer Thunder Bay—Superior North, ON

Mr. Speaker, fall is here and heating costs are becoming a big concern for seniors and families across our country.

The eco-energy home energy retrofit program helped a lot. It created jobs. It cut greenhouse gas emissions. It reduced home heating costs. The government admitted that it worked and then it killed the program.

Will the government come to its senses and bring back a national home energy retrofit program to help Canadians this winter?

The Environment
Oral Questions

Noon

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, we were clear in our last Speech from the Throne that we would review the entire suite of programs, and this is what we are doing.

I would add that $300 million is still flowing until the end of the calendar year for the home retrofit program.

We will get things done. We will do what we said in our last Speech from the Throne.

Justice
Oral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, the crime rate is going down, but the government insists on imposing its repressive version of justice that will cost Quebec and the provinces billions of dollars just to expand the prison system.

Instead of being blinded by his ideology, should the minister not invest in the targeted, rational, prevention-based measures that have been much more effective in fighting crime than the minister's elementary, partisan approach?

Justice
Oral Questions

Noon

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, we are committed to keeping law-abiding Canadian families safe in their homes, on their streets and in their communities. That means keeping dangerous criminals behind bars where they belong.

Our Conservative government is proud to be on the right side of the issue, the side of law-abiding Canadians and the side of victims who want justice.