House of Commons Hansard #80 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was veterans.

Topics

Census
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore Minister of State (Small Business and Tourism)

Mr. Speaker, as we have said all along, we do not believe Canadians should be threatened with jail time, fines, or both should they choose not to answer private and personal and intrusive questions.

That is why we have made the long form census voluntary and why we have committed to introduce legislation to eliminate the threat of jail time for all mandatory surveys.

Census
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, the long form questionnaire was eliminated for purely ideological reasons. The proof: the member for Beauce, the libertarian guru, is gloating. He is even suggesting that all Statistics Canada surveys no longer be mandatory.

Will the Prime Minister put an end to this folly and reinstate the mandatory long form census questionnaire so that we have access to reliable data?

Census
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore Minister of State (Small Business and Tourism)

Mr. Speaker, the inconsistencies and the hypocrisy of the opposition is absolutely alarming. On the one hand, when it comes to locking up offenders who have committed arson, auto theft or assault, the opposition does not want to jail them, but when it comes to people who do not want to tell the government how much time they spend doing yard work, how many rooms they have in their house, how many hours they spend with their children each week, the opposition wants to throw them in jail. It is ridiculous.

We will continue to defend the legitimate rights of all Canadians.

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

October 8th, 2010 / 11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, two days ago, the Minister of Natural Resources said about the famous cocktail fundraiser, “At no time was there any discussion about government business.”

Yet the contractor who organized the cocktail party and from whom Conservative organizer Gilles Varin extracted $140,000 confirms that they did talk about the $10 million contract.

How much longer will this charade go on? When will the Conservatives release the findings of the government inquiry into this contract, as the minister promised 10 months ago?

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, there is so much in that question to which I have to respond. Let me be crystal clear. The minister did not discuss the awarding of the contract with the individual in question. When the individual in question told the minister that he had won a federal government contract, as the minister would on any number of cases, he congratulated him. That does not constitute a discussion on a contract.

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is very hard to believe.

Paul Sauvé was told to organize this cocktail party because it was the thing to do when you won a construction contract from the Conservatives. At the party, the minister himself congratulated Mr. Sauvé on his big $10 million contract. That was not a very subtle nudge-nudge, wink-wink.

The kickback is obvious, and we do not even know who benefited from the $140,000 pocketed by organizer Gilles Varin.

Will the minister tell us who in the Conservative government had their palms greased?

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, let me be very clear. The member calls this Varin fellow a Conservative organizer. She is wrong. That is not true and the member opposite knows it is not true. The individual has never been a member of the Conservative Party. He has never been an organizer in the Conservative Party.

I do know that the member for Bourassa received campaign contributions from the individual when he was sitting in a very powerful position around the cabinet table.

Potash Industry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, given its sheer size, the possible sale of the PotashCorp of Saskatchewan is effectively the sale of the entire Canadian potash industry, especially if the Canpotex marketing system is demolished and other players like Agrium and Mosaic are pushed aside.

Billions of dollars in provincial revenues are hanging in the balance. The implications for more than a million Saskatchewanians are huge.

Again, what does the government consider to be a net benefit from any such transaction? Saskatchewan certainly has a right to know.

Potash Industry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore Minister of State (Small Business and Tourism)

Mr. Speaker, we consistently have said in the House that as a government we will be looking at the net benefit to Canada for any prospective sales. We take that responsibility very seriously.

Potash Industry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, BHP Billiton is the public bidder going after PotashCorp, but there may be others, including some from China.

Will the government confirm that it has before it right now certain inquiries from Chinese representatives? Do they represent the Sinochem Group or some other agency like the China Investment Corporation? Are they proposing an active or a passive investment? Would the government of Saskatchewan receive a golden share in any such transaction to protect the public interest? Saskatchewan people deserve answers.

Potash Industry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore Minister of State (Small Business and Tourism)

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has raised six or seven hypotheticals. Our government will review any case that falls under the purview of the Investment Canada Act. As I said before, I can assure members that in all cases the net benefit to Canada is of paramount importance.

Israel
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Tilly O'Neill-Gordon Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, when the Liberal leader accused Israel of war crimes, Canada's Jewish community knew it had no friend in the Liberal Party.

Yesterday, Liberal candidate Andrew Lang said that Canada needed to stop placating Israel. He says that Canada should criticize Israel for being insufficiently non-violent.

Israel faces relentless attacks by terrorists who want to drive the Jewish people into the sea. Does the government House leader agree with the Liberals that Canada should lecture Israel on the need to be less violent?

Israel
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, no, I do not. We completely reject the Liberal candidate's view. It is the latest attempt by the Liberal Party to try to hector the State of Israel and make political points on it.

Let me very clear. Israel is Canada's friend and ally. Our Conservative government supports Israel in its daily struggle against the anti-Semitic death cults that the Jewish people face each and every day, terrorism wanting to drive them into the sea.

Like all countries facing armed terrorist attacks, Israel has the right of self-defence, and our government will always support Israel in the exercise of that right.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, everybody in Canada knows how tightly controlled the Prime Minister's and the Privy Council offices are of their ministers and deputy ministers. Four years ago, Daniel Shaw, a policy adviser in the Prime Minister's Office, received correspondence regarding the Sean Bruyea case and his information being scattered through the department like confetti.

My question is quite clear. Four years ago, the Prime Minister's Office and the government knew what was happening. Why did they take four years to act on something on which the Privacy Commissioner said the department broke the law?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

West Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Greg Kerr Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as I have indicated, the fact is this matter came to a head yesterday and made clear to all of us that it had to be dealt with, and it is being dealt with. We are working absolutely and completely with the Privacy Commissioner. Whatever suggested changes, audits and actions are necessary will be done to ensure we protect the privacy of our important veterans.