House of Commons Hansard #92 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was copyright.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, like so much of the hyperbole coming from the member opposite, this story is speculative. It is quoting an unnamed official in another country, and we currently estimate the cost per aircraft to be in the low to mid $70 million U.S.

In fact, we are purchasing the most cost-effective variant of the aircraft at the peak of production, and I am sure that the price quoted to Canada will not be expected to change, if in fact cost overruns occur, because in the development phase, the United States has covered those costs.

Let us listen to what the former defence minister, a Liberal, had to say. “JSF's a great program for Canada and for all the partner nations in terms of military capabilities as well as the industrial participation”.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada must keep faith with our veterans and their families and the ideals of service and sacrifice.

Leaked documents suggest bureaucrats knew in 2006 that new veterans benefits would mean less cash for thousands of injured and disabled soldiers and projected savings of up to $40 million per year.

Why did it take the government four years to fix its mistake?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, our government helps veterans. Over the past few months we have invested an additional $2 billion in helping our veterans. We have implemented a number of new measures particularly to help those returning from Afghanistan with serious injuries. We want to make sure their future is financially secure.

I want to remind the hon. member that it was her government that adopted the new veterans charter in 2005. I do not know what the Liberals' intentions were at the time, but ours are different. We do not intend to save money at the expense of the veterans.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, for many veterans this upcoming week is about memories and trying to live as best they can. For our forces overseas it is another week in harm's way. For our wounded warriors it is another week of slow recovery.

Will the minister promise to review the new veterans charter and Veterans Affairs processes and make meaningful changes to compensation which has sparked a national day of protest?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I can certainly make that promise because that is what we are in the process of doing. We have already taken a number of measures to correct the mistakes in the new charter and to ensure that our modern-day veterans are protected when they return from Afghanistan with serious injuries. The minimum a veteran returning from Afghanistan with serious injuries will receive will be $58,000 a year in addition to a lump sum payment, a disability allowance, of up to $276,000. It is $58,000 a year plus $276,000.

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

November 2nd, 2010 / 2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, Conservative lobbyist Gilles Varin has stated, “I know a lot of people who are in Ottawa, in offices...”. That helped him open many doors.

Will the government acknowledge that Gilles Varin was successful, since his client, Paul Sauvé, was awarded a $9 million contract?

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, that is not the case at all, but I have news for my Bloc colleagues. The member for Brome—Missisquoi openly promotes the Réseau de résistance du Québécois in his blog. Members of this House know very well that the RRQ manifesto says that the RRQ will also rehabilitate the combatants of the Front de libération du Québec. I have a simple question for my Bloc colleagues: do they plan on rehabilitating FLQ murderers?

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, Gilles Varin acknowledged that he knew a lot of people in Ottawa. He named Paul Terrien, chief of staff of the former Quebec lieutenant, and Bernard Côté, assistant to the former Minister of Public Works, Michael Fortier. It was under Michael Fortier that the contract was awarded.

Will the government admit that Gilles Varin was successful, since his client obtained a $9 million contract, and that the Minister of Natural Resources eagerly passed the hat at a cocktail party organized by Paul Sauvé?

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I will do no such thing.

Let us look at the facts. The Bloc Québécois member of Parliament for Brome—Missisquoi is openly promoting Réseau de Résistance du Québecois on his blog. Members of the House will know what the manifesto of the RRQ says. The RRQ aims to support the combatants of the Front de libération du Québec.

I really want to know how the Liberal Party of Canada could possibly join in a coalition government with people who want to promote the record of the FLQ.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Guy André Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, internal documents show that officials in the Department of Veterans Affairs told the government from the outset that the new benefit system would mean less money for wounded soldiers.

Why did the Minister of Veterans Affairs try to save $40 million at the expense of veterans?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I want to remind the House again that the new charter was adopted under the previous Liberal government, not under our government. I do not know what the Liberals’ intentions were at the time and whether they wanted to save money at the expense of our veterans, but that decision was not made by this government. To the contrary, we have just added another $2 billion to assist our veterans by giving them additional money to ensure that, if they come back wounded, they will not have any financial worries. That is a whole new chapter this government is adding to the new veterans charter.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Guy André Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, Liberals or Conservatives, it is the same thing.

Veterans’ Week will begin this weekend with a parade where veterans demonstrate against the despicable way they are being treated by the Conservative government. In particular, they will protest its cavalier disregard for privacy and the lump sum payment.

Will the government finally restore the monthly pension for life for all our wounded veterans, as they are asking?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, it is important to state very clearly that if our veterans return wounded, they receive an allocation for lost income as well as a permanent monthly allocation for life. Taken together, these two sums amount to a minimum of $58,000 that they get if they are severely wounded. To this is added a new amount called the lump sum payment or disability award, which can be as much as $276,000. And yes, we are going to make some changes to it as well to give our veterans some options.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Dan McTeague Pickering—Scarborough East, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative cabinet is reported to have been fighting each other over the Omar Khadr plea deal while at the same time denying Canadian government involvement in it. It seems the Prime Minister was not even aware of what was going on and was not in the country to act as cabinet referee.

A senior official called the government's denials of plea bargaining “bewildering”. Others would call it what it is: truth stretching.

Could the Prime Minister inform Canadians if he supports the Khadr deal, and when exactly did he become aware of it?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, let me reiterate that the Government of Canada was not part of the plea negotiation. It was our position throughout Mr. Khadr's trial that we allow the U.S. process to conclude. I point out that was the same position of the former Liberal government.