House of Commons Hansard #95 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was information.

Topics

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Questions

Noon

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, this incident truly was tragic and we do sympathize with the family.

My colleague across the floor should be aware that the public safety committee has taken this study. We have been involved. The report is not complete yet. I think it will be broad ranging.

As I previously mentioned, this government did put additional funding in the area of mental health in Correctional Service Canada. We have moved a long way.

Health
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, today 10 Canadians will die by suicide and tomorrow 10 more Canadians will die by suicide.

Suicide is the leading cause of death for first nations youth and the second leading cause of death for youth ages 10 to 24. That is 10 years old. Countries that have a national suicide prevention strategy, like the U.K. and the U.S., have much lower suicide rates in Canada.

It is a national crisis and we need to act now. When will the government establish a national suicide prevention strategy for Canada?

Health
Oral Questions

Noon

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, suicide is a tragic event and it affects far too many Canadian families. The minister is from the north and she understands how real and very tragic this issue is. Sixty-five million dollars has been spent to date to implement the national aboriginal youth suicide prevention strategy, and there is more. We committed $285 million in budget 2010 to federal aboriginal health programs in the area of suicide prevention, maternal child health, health human resources and the aboriginal health transition fund.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Gérard Asselin Manicouagan, QC

Mr. Speaker, the president and CEO of the Quebec Forestry Industry Council, Guy Chevrette, says that the industry's main challenge is modernizing its products. He says the problem is “The lack of money. The banks are overly cautious”.

The federal government must help the forestry industry to make the transition by providing loan guarantees.

Will the government decide, once and for all, to help the forestry industry?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, as of October 31, 2010, Export Development Canada had helped Quebec's forestry industry by providing credit support, accounts receivable insurance and loan guarantees totalling $7.6 billion.

We are developing new products and new markets. We are very proud of what our government has done. However, the Bloc Québécois has voted against all the measures that have been put forward in recent years.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

November 5th, 2010 / 12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of the Honourable Steve Peters, Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Kootenay—Columbia
B.C.

Conservative

Jim Abbott Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, during the course of today's question period, the member for Outremont's comments were completely reprehensible when he was asking about the member for North Vancouver. If he actually believes the comments are factual, he must make the comments outside of this House. We cannot use this chamber to say things that are factually inaccurate or slanderous.

The comments that the member for Outremont made were absolutely slanderous toward the actual actions of the member for North Vancouver. He must make those statements outside this House.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the revelations of the CBC and the Globe and Mail make it clear that the Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board simply cannot continue in his role while this is under investigation. He has to step aside.

As you know, Mr. Speaker, it is a federal affidavit that indicates that the Credit Suisse for whom he made these transfers is believed to have facilitated the movement of funds offshore, the clients wanting to hide their investments and other income from the Canada Revenue Agency.

The parliamentary secretary authorized these transfers and as an experienced banker he knew exactly what he was doing and why. He is so far refusing to say how many of these transfers he approved to Switzerland or other tax havens.

Every time a government attacks the opposition instead of answering the questions, it is because it has no defence. I will be outside this House as requested. I want to know, is the member's colleague who is in question here going to be outside to say how many of these things he has approved and how many of these transfers to tax--

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

It is apparent that we are into a debate on facts which is not a matter of procedure and therefore, in my view, not a point of order.

Is the hon. member for Scarborough—Rouge River rising on a point of order?

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Derek Lee Scarborough—Rouge River, ON

On another point of order, Mr. Speaker, during question period, if my ears were not tricking me, the member for Cypress Hills—Grasslands, the parliamentary secretary answering for the government, appeared to use the name of a member of the House in the answer. Sometimes this will happen inadvertently, but in this case on behalf of the government he was reading a scripted answer and the name was mentioned.

I think at the very least the member, on behalf of the government, because the answer was scripted should provide an apology, and Mr. Speaker, you should ask the member for that apology on behalf of the government, unless there is another explanation.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the government, on behalf of the member for Cypress Hills—Grasslands, I want to offer our sincere apology to the member for using his last name in this chamber.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I did not raise the matter because I thought the member realized his error when I looked at him, but hon. members know that using another member's name in the House is out of order. They must refer to members by either their title as minister, parliamentary secretary or whatever, or by their constituency name. I would urge hon. members to show proper restraint in that regard so that our rules are complied with in every respect.

Veterans Ombudsman
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

West Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Greg Kerr Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table, in both official languages, the 2009-10 annual report of the Office of the Veterans Ombudsman, entitled “For Veterans and Good Governance”.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the 2009 annual report on the RCMP use of the law enforcement justification provisions. This report addresses the RCMP's use of specific provisions within the law enforcement justification regime, which is also set out in sections 25.(1) to 25.(4) of the Criminal Code. This report also documents the nature of the investigations in which these provisions were used.