House of Commons Hansard #115 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was amendments.

Topics

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Jean Dorion Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher, QC

Mr. Speaker, when the Minister of International Cooperation was asked about the cancellation of funding for the NGO KAIROS, the minister suggested that she had nothing to do with the decision and that CIDA officials were responsible. Yesterday in committee, the minister finally acknowledged that she was the one who made the decision against CIDA's recommendation.

Why did the minister deliberately mislead the House? Why is she trying to blame public servants for her own ideological decisions?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, quite the contrary. I will take full responsibility. It is my responsibility to ensure that Canadian public funds are utilized in an accountable and effective way to help people living in poverty. As I have always done, I take advice from the department as well as other parties.

This is something that is important to Canadians. They want to see more food, more children going to school and more medicine getting to those in need.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Jean Dorion Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher, QC

Mr. Speaker, KAIROS has been working with the federal government since 1976. The report prepared by government officials was very positive and recommended that the organization continue to be funded.

Will the minister admit that her decision to cut funding to KAIROS was based solely on political and ideological factors that have nothing to do with the quality of service provided by that organization? Will the minister restore funding to KAIROS?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

The answer to the question, Mr. Speaker, is no. It was made on the most effective use of public funds for people living in poverty, and, no, the decision will stand.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Globe and Mail has obtained the Conservative government's communications plan designed to make Canadians and Quebeckers swallow its plan to harmonize Canadian and U.S. border controls. The Conservative government believes that the general public underestimates the terrorist threat.

Does the government not think that this security perimeter should be established in a more transparent manner, and that a more balanced approach to security and freedom should be adopted?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, it is quite obvious that the main objective is to ensure not only that the Canada-U.S. border is secure and meets all standards, but also that Canada's interests are protected through increased trade.

We know that this government has defended Canadians' interests and, by means of its economic action plan, increased Canada's economic activity, which has created jobs. Furthermore, we take our responsibility to protect the border very seriously. We defend the interests—

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Order. The hon. member for Vaudreuil-Soulanges.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebeckers are quite right to be wary of the Conservative plan to create a Canada-U.S. security perimeter. All we know about the plan is that it was negotiated in great secrecy. The federal government is preparing to share personal information about individuals with the American authorities.

Can the government tell us if its plan, which is to be made public in January, has been approved by the Privacy Commissioner?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois is getting worked up about hearsay and speculation.

Let us be clear: of the political parties in the House—not even counting the Bloc Québécois, of course—ours is the one that defends the interests of Canadians. We do so by promoting our trade agreements, opening up our borders and creating jobs in Canada. That is what Quebeckers and Canadians want to see.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, according to the 2009-10 public accounts, Canada spent roughly $18 million on its embassies in Europe. For the Caribbean and Latin America, it spent about $17.5 million and for Africa, barely $1 million.

Is this imbalance a precursor to decisions to come with regard to our ability to have a diplomatic presence on the African continent?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am glad for the hon. member's question because it gives me an opportunity to reiterate that this government has been able to double its aid to Africa. This government has been able to provide additional funding for food aid. When this government has a chance to review all its operations—as well it should—it does so in the best interests of all Canadians. This is just another rumour started by the Liberals.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, since I am not getting a straight answer I will change the subject.

In March, the House passed a bill on Supreme Court justices. A majority of the representatives elected by the people passed a bill and sent it to the Senate. The bill has been languishing there ever since. The Conservative senators refuse even to refer the bill to committee to allow people to discuss it. As the old adage goes, things come in threes.

Two or three weeks ago, they killed Bill C-311. This week Bill S-216 got the axe.

Will Bill C-332 be the next victim of the Conservatives in the Senate?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Minister of State (Democratic Reform)

Mr. Speaker, the member referred to the Senate. What would be very helpful for the Liberal Party to do would be to support our legislation that would limit the terms of senators to eight years and, also, to support our initiative to have senators elected. I think that would go a long way to ensuring democracy remains strong in Canada.

Why does the Liberal Party not support democracy?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government's deceit, inaction and hypocrisy have left Canada shunned at climate conferences like Copenhagen and Cancun. Canadians are furious.

Canada's obstruction at Cancun is so undermining that it has been criticized as ecocide.

Shamefully, our part-time environment minister is publicly blaming Canada's own intransigence on China, a developing country that has already made massive investments to reduce emissions and has committed to a major reduction target.

Is poking China in the eye the government's new climate policy?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, to truly address the issue of climate change, we need to have all the major emitters as part of the solution and that is this government's position. Unfortunately, the Liberals do not take the environment very seriously and they laugh about it.

A couple of months ago, taxpayers paid for those members to go to the Nagoya biodiversity conference. They did not even show up. Now in Cancun, the Liberal critic on the environment left two days early. Is his suntan done and now he is leaving and going back? Shame on the Liberals.